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Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
Getting out of the building
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Getting out of the building

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These are the slides for a workshop for the Behavioural Design day at Digital Shoreditch 2013. The workshop starts from the proposition that creating great designs requires a deep understanding of …

These are the slides for a workshop for the Behavioural Design day at Digital Shoreditch 2013. The workshop starts from the proposition that creating great designs requires a deep understanding of users' behaviour, abilities, preferences, goals and motivations. It covers a set of practical techniques that designers can use to find and interview users, and gain new insights.

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  • These aren’t new ideas. A very smart man called Mark Weiser coined the term Ubiquitous computing back in the late 1980s.
  • Transcript

    1. Getting out of the buildingDigital ShoreditchMay 2013John Waterworth@jwaterworth
    2. There Are NoFacts InsideYour Building,So Get OutsideSteve BlankGetting out of the buildingCustomer Development Manifesto at http://steveblank.com/category/customer-development-manifesto/Photograph of Steve Blank from steveblank.fi2
    3. Behavioural design3PeopleHow they behave todayHow you want them to behave tomorrowHow you can bridge that gapUnderstandingWhat they’re doingHow and why they are doing itBarriers and challenges they experienceWorldview, outcomes and value for them
    4. Getting out of the building4IdeasProductInsightTestassumptionsEvaluateproductsGenerateinsights
    5. Research and evaluation5DetailInteractionsVisionExperienceTestingProductDiscoveryPeople
    6. Minimum viable research6Little and often5 to 10 people, 20 to 60 minutesOne day, once a monthBuild up to once a weekPower of small batchesEasier to get startedLearn from your mistakesDifferent people, different questions
    7. Research cycle71. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence6. Debrief, share, draw conclusionsDrawn from Lean UX Workshop by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden of Proof Innovation Labs.
    8. Planning81. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence6. Debrief, share, draw conclusionsDrawn from Lean UX Workshop by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden of Proof Innovation Labs.
    9. Execution91. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence6. Debrief, share, draw conclusionsDrawn from Lean UX Workshop by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden of Proof Innovation Labs.
    10. Insight101. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence6. Debrief, share, draw conclusionsDrawn from Lean UX Workshop by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden of Proof Innovation Labs.
    11. Practice11ObjectiveForm teams and start talkingSteps1. Get into groups of three2. Decide who is A, B and C3. Find out a bit about each other5 Minutes
    12. Planning121. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence6. Debrief, share, draw conclusions
    13. Decide what you want to learn13QuestionsWhat strategies do people use toremember their user names andpasswords?HypothesesUsers prefer to use Facebook or Twitterlogin than to create a separate user nameand password for each service
    14. Decide who to talk to14Representative usersCustomers and prospectsStaff – client, colleagues and partnersVariety and challengeDifferent kinds of peopleDifferent types of customers or usersDifficult to satisfyCan get very political
    15. Prepare your experiment15Break into topicsEach has its own objectiveRelated to a question or hypothesisDecide best approachSemi-structuredHelp with timing and priorityProvide a sense of flowHelp you to be flexible
    16. Talking16Learning about themBehaviour, aspirations, preferencesNot asking what they wantGuided conversationHave objectives and overall structureSteering and focusingNot following a scriptListening, really listening!
    17. Show me17Observing useAlways better than asking about useOwn product or comparatorPaper or interactive prototypeLearn why features are importantPhysical material can be importantChoosing tasksDecide the tasks in planningSet tasks based on what they’ve told youAlways give clear scenarios
    18. Activities18Using your handsArrange words into groups or listsPlace concepts on conceptual targetsComplete a diary of recent eventsDraw or annotate diagramsGreat toolsHelp people to remember and articulateGive you lots to dig intoAvoid complex questionsHave a bit of fun
    19. Homework19Extra informationKeep a simple diaryTake photosBring examplesGreat conversation startersGive you lots to ask questions aboutHelp people to rememberGet people engage quickly
    20. Discussion guide20Research aidAgenda for the session, not a scriptHelps your mental rehearsalStakeholders can contributeProvides some consistencyProvides a recordContentsSection per topic, with objective and timeFixed text you need to read outStarter questions for each topic
    21. Practice21ObjectiveCreate a discussion guide for a10 minute interviewSteps1. Agree who each of you will interview2. Think of a subject3. Prepare a discussion guide5 Minutes
    22. Execution221. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence6. Debrief, share, draw conclusions
    23. Get out of the building23Go to them (if you can)In their home or officeCoffee shop, client’s premises, venueKeep it real (if you can’t)Sit on a sofa in front of a TVCreate a shop counterSet expectationsIt’s an interview, not a meeting, appraisal
    24. Collect evidence24Starter kitCamera, notebook, digital voice recorderNote takingAim for a telegram styleFrustrated by X because no YRecording times for verbatim quotesIt’s hardListening, writing, thinking!Get better with practice
    25. Research in pairs25InterviewerFocus on the participantAsk main questions and do any activitiesAssistantManage any setup and recordingsTake notes during the sessionAsk supplementary questionsSwitch roles
    26. Giving good interview26Be clearAsk concise questionsAsk questions they can understandIf you need to, give backgroundinformation then ask the questionListen … really listenReceive, Appreciate, Summarise, AskShows that you understand what they sayShows that you value what they sayHelps you to dig deeper
    27. Giving good interview27Be flexibleDon’t plough on regardless if the interviewisn’t workingFollow the participant’s lead in order,timing and approachBe humanChat about the weather, traffic, etc.Offer drinks and biscuitsNod, smile, frown, laugh, commiserateBe surprised, be concerned, be interested
    28. Getting them talking28Open, neutral questionsHow do you use … to …?What do you think about …?How do these compare …?Stories and examplesHave you ever …?Can you tell me about the last time that …?What did you do when …?How did you … when …?
    29. Keeping them talking29Focus inIn what way …?Can you tell me more about …?You said … why/how/when/what/who …?EchoingConfusing?Helpful?Bananas?
    30. Digging deeper30NeedsExpressed, implied and latent needsMeans end chainProduct attributes, consequences of useand personal valuesFive whysRoot cause analysis
    31. Bad questions31ClosedDo you buy groceries online?How do you buy your groceries?LeadingDo you buy your groceries from Tesco?Where do you buy your groceries?SpeculationWhat would you do if Ocado …?Has … ever happened? What did you do?
    32. Bad questions32Too many whys?Can sound accusativeParticularly after a sensitive admissionCan be repetitiveRephrase or softenWhat makes X important?Can you say why X is important to you?Apologise for laddering
    33. Emotion33Don’t ask directlyHow did you feel when …?Do you enjoy …?Pick up on emotional wordsYou said X was frustrating. In what way?You said Y was amazing. What made itamazing?Shows that you appreciate the emotionalcontent of what they say, but withoutleading them
    34. Take your time34Go at their paceUse your early questions to gauge theirthinking and answering timesDon’t make them feel pressuredA little silence is OKDon’t rush to the next questionThe more you talk the less they talkThey may be just about to say somethingabsolutely amazing
    35. Practice35ObjectiveTake each role in a 10 minute interviewSteps1. A interviews B, while C takes notes2. C, B then A critique the interview3. Rotate until you’ve all tried all roles40 minutes
    36. Insight361. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence6. Debrief, share, draw conclusions
    37. Analysis and synthesis37AnalysisExtracting the data from your notesGrouping and refining the dataIdentifying patterns and connectionsSynthesisCreating insight and meaningCreating initial design ideasTell their story
    38. Research and evaluation38DetailInteractionsVisionExperienceTestingProductDiscoveryPeople
    39. Evaluation39Emerging productStoryboard or journeyPaper or interactive prototypeProduct incrementThink aloud user testingSimple, cheap and easy to learnRobust and reliable techniqueCombine with design research
    40. Bit at the end40WarningsGuidelinesPaperworkRecruitingAdvanced approaches
    41. Be careful41Stranger dangerKeep yourself safeKeep your colleagues safeGet consentDon’t stalk the general publicDon’t do research in public placesGet permission before any research inprivate places
    42. Bias42Beware of your own assumptionsand prejudices, and those ofthe stakeholdersThe wrong approach will narrow thepossible findings and bias the results
    43. Honesty43They don’t always tell the truthDont want to appear stupid or negativeDon’t want to cause troubleMay be a subtext you dont know aboutCreate a safe environmentYou’re there to learn from themIts not a test or appraisalTheir honest input is what you need toimprove the product
    44. You’re only human44Diminishing returnsYou will get tired and bored eventuallyYou will form a theory and stop listeningSteady paceLeave gaps between sessionsEat and drink normallyMix it upLittle and oftenTypes of participants
    45. Guidelines45Market Research Societywww.mrs.org.uk/standards/guidelinesBritish Healthcare BusinessIntelligence Associationwww.bhbia.org.uk
    46. Paperwork46SourceSteve KrugRocket Surgery Made Easywww.sensible.comPaperworkConsent formIntroduction scriptReceipt of incentive
    47. Recruiting47Do your own recruitingRecruit from lists you already haveLook where they congregateTrade bodies, LinkedIn groups, FacebookThrough your clientUse a recruiterMoney versus effortGood for general publicGood for large numbers
    48. Encourage participation48Ask for their helpBetter understand your needsHelp us to produce a better productA chance for you to have your sayNot market researchIncentives£3 coffee, £20 voucher, £40 to £100Beware of professionalsBeware of biasMust be voluntary
    49. Remote49May be your only choiceParticipants are spread around the worldPart of corporate cultureRefine the discussion guide in face-to-faceinterviews, then adapt and go remoteHarder to manageTakes longer to build up a rapportConstrains your research approachLess control over interview environmentTechnology problems can ruin sessions
    50. Shadowing50Watch them in contextEncourage them to work as normalAsk them to explain what they are doingPrompt for clarificationTake photographs and make notesLess controlHarder to direct them to areas of interestHigh priority work may take them of topic,but carry on observingLack of privacy may inhibit response
    51. Groups51Useful optionCollaborative tasks and multiplayer gamesYounger childrenCompare and contrast experiencesMuch harder to leadManage dominant individualsHard for them to ‘show me’Use activities to get response fromindividuals, then compare and discussdifferences and commonalities
    52. Further reading52
    53. Recap53DontTalk only to experts and stakeholdersOne big bang effortInterrogate peopleAsk for requirements and featuresWork through a fixed scriptConstrain them to specific answersMake people feel more nervousTry to wing itTry to remember what people saidTry to remember what you sawDoTalk to a range of usersLittle and oftenListen and learnUnderstand their point of viewSteer the conversationEncourage people to talk openlyHelp people to relax and enjoy itCreate a flexible discussion guideTake good notesCollect photos, screenshots andphysical materials

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