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Presentation about the soft values of harbours in the world given at the Hogeschool of Amsterdam for the Engineeringweek.

Presentation about the soft values of harbours in the world given at the Hogeschool of Amsterdam for the Engineeringweek.

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  • 1. SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS Hafensafari Hogeschool van Amsterdam Amsterdam, 25 Jan 2010 © Prof Dr Eric Van Hooydonk Hoogleraar Universiteit Antwerpen Voorzitter Watererfgoed Vlaanderen
  • 2. PORT LITERATURE THROUGH THE AGES (1)
      • Athenian Stranger. And are there harbours on the seaboard?
      • Cleinias . Excellent harbours, Stranger; there could not be better.
      • Athenian Stranger. Alas! what a prospect!
      • (Plato, Laws , Book IV)
  • 3. PORT LITERATURE THROUGH THE AGES (2)
    • The giant bustle, the coal-heavers, the
    • bargemen, the black buildings, the ten
    • thousand times ten thousand sounds
    • and movements of that monstrous
    • harbour formed the grandest object I
    • had ever witnessed. One man seems as
    • a drop in the ocean; you feel annihilated
    • in the immensity of that heart of all the
    • Earth.
    • (Thomas Carlyle on the port of London
    • in a letter to his wife of 23 June 1824)
  • 4. PORT LITERATURE THROUGH THE AGES (3)
    • O quays, O ports, O trains, O cranes, O tugs !
    • (Fernando Pessoa, Triumphal Ode , 1914)
  • 5. PORT LITERATURE THROUGH THE AGES (4)
        • In a wintery haze, behind us, lies the port area w ith its neon lights and chimney flares, constantly flickering like an obscene pinball machine. […] Gigantic container vessels were on their way ! And mega consortia of shipping companies ! Everything mega and giga ! […] Big, obscure powers stand against us
        • (C. de Stoop on the construction of Deurganck Dock, 2000)
  • 6. THE NEGATIVE IMAGE OF SEAPORTS (1)
    • Havens of sin, poverty, crime, disease, etc.
      • Dockwork = “the dustbin of society”
      • Red light districts in Sailortowns
      • Drunkenness, sex, venereal diseases, crime etc.
      • Fishing port subcultures
      • Emigrants, immigrants and stowaways
  • 7. THE NEGATIVE IMAGE OF SEAPORTS (2)
    • Centres of moral and political corruption
      • Plato: “Ports make men unfaithful
      • and democratic”
      • Plato recommended a ban on the
      • importation of innovations by
      • foreigners arriving at seaports
      • Cf Knut Hamsun on hollowness
      • of modern culture in Norwegian
      • fishing ports
  • 8. THE NEGATIVE IMAGE OF SEAPORTS (3)
    • Cultural wastelands governed by Mammon
      • Famous 1842 caricature of the inhabitants of Hamburg by the Frenchman Jacob Gallois:
      • “ [...] their behaviour has all the appeal of a price list, the perfect charm of an invoice, yes even the adorability of a bill of lading. Speak to them of literature, and they will start about sugar and coffee; talk to them about emotion and they will quickly move on to cocoa and spices. And if you should bump into a merchant in the street and greet him, then he will doubtless make a face as if to say he expects a two-percent commission for returning the favour”
  • 9. THE NEGATIVE IMAGE OF SEAPORTS (4)
    • Hotbeds of maritime Mafia business
      • Shady affairs that hit the headlines
        • Drugs, genetically manipulated food, illegal household waste, hazardous industrial waste, toxic scrap ships, contraband cigarettes, counterfeit consumer goods
        • Marine pollution and substandard shipping
        • Instruments of globalisation
  • 10. THE NEGATIVE IMAGE OF SEAPORTS (5)
    • Battlefields of irrational
    • competition
      • Obscure powers
      • determining port policies
      • Mediaeval inter-city wars
  • 11. THE NEGATIVE IMAGE OF SEAPORTS (6)
    • Ugly industrial areas
      • Ports are made of drab concrete and prefab elements
      • No trace of any artistry whatsoever
  • 12. THE NEGATIVE IMAGE OF SEAPORTS (7)
    • Destroyers of the natural environment
      • Dibden Bay, Deurganck Dock, Second Maasvlakte, Western Scheldt Container Terminal, Vuosaari, Monfalcone, Granadilla, Küdema, Bristol, Sheerness, etc.
  • 13. THE NEGATIVE IMAGE OF SEAPORTS (8)
    • Cesspools of pollution and disaster areas
      • Light, water and air pollution
      • Explosions and collisions
      • Generation of an orgy of inland transportation
  • 14. THE NEGATIVE IMAGE OF SEAPORTS (9)
    • Dehumanised islands drifting away from society
      • Ports moved away from the city
      • Automated terminals
      • Inaccessibility of port areas
  • 15. THE EROSION OF PUBLIC SUPPORT
    • Until 1970: absolute priority of seaports policy in centres of decision-making
    • Since 1970: ever fiercer opposition against new projects
    • Ignorance and lack of interest with the general public
    • Ports only hit the headlines in a negative context
    • A vicious circle
  • 16.  
  • 17.  
  • 18. From Any port…
    • Bird’s Anyport Model:
    • a gradual relocation
    • due to the changing
    • needs in port
    • development and
    • operations
  • 19. … to Banished Port
    • An abrupt, drastic, all-embracing and revolutionary relocation due to external, societal objections
  • 20. Helsinki
  • 21. SOME EFFECTS OF THE NEGATIVE IMAGE
    • Lack of public and political support lead to
      • Lack of confidence in the port sector
      • Lower priority in national and local decision-making processes
      • Lack of public funding
      • Ever tougher environmental and other requirements
      • Slow and uncertain decision-making processes
      • Unattractiveness for private investors
      • Port congestion and additional pollution
      • Unemployment
      • Unattractiveness of port cities to tourists
      • Etc
    • The negative image is an existential problem
  • 22. HOW TO RESTORE THE PUBLIC IMAGE OF PORTS ? (1)
    • Four classic approaches
      • PR, communications and events
      • A more businesslike profile
      • Greening of port policy and management
      • Stakeholder relation management
  • 23. HOW TO RESTORE THE PUBLIC IMAGE OF PORTS ? (2)
    • A new, comprehensive approach:
      • SOFT VALUES MANAGEMENT
      • FOR SEAPORTS (SVMS)
  • 24. Soft Values Management for Seaports (SVMS)
    • Ports are more than money-making machines
    • Ports should manage and exploit their non-socio-economic values and functions on the basis of a comprehensive, co-ordinated approach
  • 25.  
  • 26. Soft values: the concept
    • Soft values of seaports = port history, port heritage, port art, waterfront redevelopment, cruise tourism, port tourism, port ecology…
    • SVMS can yield a threefold return
      • restoration of public support
      • contribution to commercial port promotion
      • instrument for city marketing and tourist promotion
    • A positive seaport and seaport city identity
    • ‘ Corporate Social Responsibility’ of port authorities
  • 27. SPIRITUAL SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (1)
    • The seaport as an object of worship and legend
      • Atlantis
      • Portunus
  • 28. SPIRITUAL SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (2)
    • The seaport as a place of refuge
      • for vessels
      • for seamen
      • for stowaways
      • hospitality is raison d’être of a seaport
  • 29. SPIRITUAL SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (3)
    • The seaport as a gateway between historical eras (1)
      • World history is port history
      • Babylon, Tyre, Sidon, Byblos, Beruta, Cadiz, Marseilles, Piraeus, Naucratis, Carthage, Alexandria, Rome, Dover, Bononia, Birka, Dorestad, Haithabu, Hamwic, Quentovic, Tiel, Visby, Byzance/Constantinople/Istanbul, Cinque Ports, Hansa Ports (Lübeck, Hamburg, Bremen), Venice, Genoa, Bruges, Antwerp, Lissabon, Seville, Amsterdam, Rotterdam, London, Liverpool, Trieste, Saint Petersburg, Gdansk, ...
  • 30. SPIRITUAL SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (4)
    • The seaport as a gate between historical eras (2)
      • Ports and local history
      • Ports have a fascinating story to tell
  • 31. SPIRITUAL SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (5)
    • The seaport as an international conduit for free trade and merchandise
      • IAPH motto: “World Peace Through World Trade – World Trade Through World Ports”
      • Ports and daily life - fruit, coffee, tea, tobacco, rice, cars…
  • 32. SPIRITUAL SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (6)
    • The seaport as a breeding ground for human intelligence
      • Shipbuilding, maritime trade, port engineering, port economics, maritime law
      • Banking, accounting, insurance, zoology, botany, ethnology, astronomy
  • 33. SPIRITUAL SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (7)
    • The seaport as a specific cosmopolitan community
      • A sense of solidarity
      • A collective open-mindedness
      • A cosmopolitan attitude
      • A swiftness of thought
      • A love for the port
  • 34. SPIRITUAL SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (8)
    • The seaport as an artistic theme
      • “ Names such as Evergreen, Uniglory, K. Line and Genstar can suddenly sound like poetry” (Christina Weiss)
  • 35. SPIRITUAL SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (9)
    • The seaport as a source of civic pride
      • Every seaport tells an epic story of human endeavour
        • Struggle for maritime connections
      • Port cities often enjoy an independent status
  • 36. TANGIBLE SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (1)
    • The seaport as a sensory stimulant
      • Typical sounds, sights, smells, tastes and touches of seaports
  • 37. TANGIBLE SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (2)
    • The seaport as a collection of immoveable heritage
      • Musée des Docks romains at Marseilles
      • Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s docks and locks
      • Hamburg Speicherstadt
      • Port of London Authority Building
      • Caland and Lambermont monuments
  • 38. TANGIBLE SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (3)
    • The seaport as a unique man-made landscape
      • Port cities rank among the most beautiful cities in the world
      • Port lay-out and design inventions
      • Dynamism of the port landscape: constant movement and constant change
  • 39. TANGIBLE SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (4)
    • The seaport as an experimental field for urban planners and architects
      • Waterfront development and bold architectural and urban planning projects
  • 40. TANGIBLE SOFT VALUES OF SEAPORTS (5)
    • The seaport as a tourist attraction and a recreation resort
  • 41. SVMS (1)
    • Soft Values Management for Seaports (SVMS)
      • Soft values are the dormant assets of seaports
      • Underrated and ignored
      • A fifth means in order to restore public support for seaports
      • A means to strike a new balance with environmental policy
  • 42. SVMS (2)
      • Port managers should shake off their philistine image and bring a coherent, more-encompassing and attractive story that appeals to society as a whole
      • Soft values should not be the monopoly of environmentalists
      • Ports have excellent soft arguments to defend their case and to enter into a real dialogue with environmentalists
  • 43. SVMS (3)
    • SVMS is not irrational and can become hard
      • SVMS is a legal obligation under Birds, Habitats, EIA and SEA Directives and related international conventions
      • SVMS should ensure that positive soft impacts of plans and projects are taken into account as well
      • SVMS should prevent distorted environmental assessments
  • 44. SVMS (4)
    • The need for SVMS Plans
      • Combine, coordinate, cluster efforts: a comprehensive approach instead of ad hoc initiatives
      • Integrate into formal planning processes and assessments
      • Port authorities should take the lead
      • SVMS is a strategy to restore public support for seaports
  • 45. SVMS (5)
    • Elements for SVMS Plans
      • Taking stock of soft values
      • Developing public relations and organising events and festivities
      • Telling the story of seaports
        • The Ports Portable
        • Port museums
  • 46. SVMS (6)
      • Managing the landscape and immoveable port heritage in city centres
        • Identify port heritage
        • Listed status
        • Refurbishing
        • Reconstruction
      • Attracting port operations and seagoing ships in city centres
      • Reviving the maritime feel of port cities
  • 47. SVMS (7)
      • Reinforcing the original port character of dockland redevelopment
        • Some projects ignore the port-related past and setting
        • Redeveloped docklands
        • increasingly resemble each
        • other
        • Projects should reflect local history and be mixed with port activities
          • V & A Waterfront
          • Euroméditerranée
  • 48. SVMS (8)
      • Reintegrating port activities and urban life and planning
        • Port of Vlaardingen
        • Water taxi’s of Rotterdam
  • 49. SVMS (9)
      • Managing immoveable port heritage in active port areas
        • “ Scope of application of heritage conservation law ends where port areas begin”
        • Heritage conservation in port areas should be realistic
        • Heritage conservation and port interests can be allies
  • 50. SVMS (10)
      • Managing the landscape, planning and architectural values of active port areas
        • Living port areas should be protected as landscapes
        • Not a static, but a dynamic protection regime
        • Such protection implies ensuring further developments
  • 51. SVMS (11)
      • Opening up port areas for tourism and recreation
        • Small efforts can have big effects
        • Signposts, picnic points, vantage points, watchtowers, cycle tracks, benches, parking places, snackbars, signs for shipspotters
        • Restaurants and bars in ports and in terminals
  • 52. SVMS (12)
      • Involving port authorities in port-related cultural initiatives
        • More actively and systematically
      • Integrating environmental port management into soft values management
        • Environmental aspects are only one facet of soft values of seaports – and they are overstressed
        • A holistic approach and policy integration
        • Opening up nature conservation areas for the public
  • 53. SVMS (13)
      • Integrating soft values management into daily port management
        • Selection of terminal operators: high-quality architecture instead of a purely utilitarian lay-out
        • Integrate tourism and recreation opportunities
        • Seek positive landscape effects
  • 54. SVMS (14)
      • Cooperating with maritime heritage organisations
      • Integrating SVMS into the action of maritime clusters
      • Appointing a SVMS officer in port authorities
      • Exchanging good SVMS practice
  • 55. CONTACT
    • Eric Van Hooydonk
    • Emiel Banningstraat 21-23
    • B-2000 Antwerp
    • Belgium
    • T + 32 3 238 67 14
    • F + 32 3 248 88 63
    • [email_address]
    • www.ericvanhooydonk.be