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Workforce Investment Conference.Oct2006
 

Workforce Investment Conference.Oct2006

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South Carolina Economic Overview/Analysis - Oct/Nov 2006

South Carolina Economic Overview/Analysis - Oct/Nov 2006

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    Workforce Investment Conference.Oct2006 Workforce Investment Conference.Oct2006 Presentation Transcript

    • SOUTH CAROLINA ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Using LMI for Planning and Evaluation 2006 Workforce Development Conference October 29 – November 1, 2006 Mike Daniels Research and Planning Administrator S.C. Employment Security Commission
    • Essential LMI Data for the Business Professional
      • Labor Force
      • Industry Employment
      • Employment by County, MSA & WIA
      • Occupational Wages
      • Population Trends
      • Special studies:
        • Regional Economic Profiles
        • Worker Commuting Patterns
    • Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics US Unemployment Rate by Educational Attainment September 2006 Employment status of the civilian population 25 years and older by educational attainment Education is the key to labor market success – The unemployment rate for persons with a bachelor’s degree and higher was 2.0% in September.
    • Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Full-time workers age 25 years and older Education is the key to labor market success – Persons with a bachelor’s degree and higher earn $1,047 per week compared to $420 per week for persons with less than a high school diploma. US Median Weekly Earnings By Educational Attainment 3 rd Quarter 2006
    • Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Median weekly earnings of the nation’s 108.2 million full-time wage and salary workers were $675 in the third quarter of 2006. Women had median earnings of $599 per week, or 80% of the $749 median for men. US Median Weekly Earnings By Gender 3 rd Quarter 2006
    • Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics US Median Weekly Earnings By Race and Gender 3 rd Quarter 2006 Median earnings for Asians were $798 per week, followed by Whites ($692), Blacks ($555), and Hispanics ($485). By gender, Asian men had the highest median weekly earnings at $857, while Hispanic women had the lowest at $440.
    • Average weekly earnings increased 0.2% over the month to $569.19 in September. The highest industry average was Information at $867.89, followed by Construction ($798.11), and Manufacturing ($698.83). US Average Weekly Earnings By Industry September 2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
    • Understanding Your Local Economy…
      • As population increases, more workers are needed to provide services that individuals and businesses depend upon.
      • The services industry is expected to provide half of all new jobs in South Carolina through the remainder of this decade. By that time, nearly 40% of the state’s total employment will be in services.
      • Health services and educational services, in particular will be critically impacted by population growth and changes.
      South Carolina Economy Facts
    • SC Labor Force… (based on Household Survey)
    • In September, the number of persons in the labor force rose by 6,138 (0.3%) to a record 2.125 million. Since September 2005, the number of persons in the labor force has increased by 32,485 (1.6%). SC Labor Force September 2004 – September 2006 Source: SCESC/LMI
    • SC Employment September 2004 – September 2006 In September, the number of persons employed increased by 8,682 (0.4%) to a record 1.99 million. Since September 2005, the number of persons employed grew by 44,253 (2.3%). Source: SCESC/LMI
    • SC Unemployment September 2004 – September 2006 In September, the number of persons unemployed fell by 2,544 to 135,691. Since September 2005, the number of persons unemployed fell by 11,768 (8.0%). Source: SCESC/LMI
    • Source: SCESC/LMI SC unemployment rate fell 0.1 percentage point to 6.4% in September. This month’s rate is 0.6 percentage point lower than September 2005. SC Unemployment Rate
    • South Carolina Unemployment Rates by County September 2006 State Unemployment Rate = 6.4% Greenwood 8.2 Oconee 7.9 Anderson 7.1 Pickens 6.5 Greenville 5.3 Spartanburg 7.1 York 5.5 Laurens 7.1 McCormick 10.4 Edgefield 8.1 Aiken 6.6 Lexington 4.8 Saluda 6.6 Barnwell 10.2 Orangeburg 9.7 Calhoun 7.2 Allendale 11.5 Hampton 8.0 Jasper 5.0 Beaufort 4.3 Colleton 6.7 Bamberg 9.5 Charleston 5.4 Dorchester 5.2 Berkeley 5.5 Georgetown 6.3 Williamsburg 8.7 Clarendon 8.6 Sumter 8.0 Florence 7.6 Dillon 8.7 Lee 8.7 Darlington 7.8 Marlboro 10.1 Chesterfield 9.1 Richland 6.1 Kershaw 6.3 Fairfield 8.6 Lancaster 9.3 Union 9.9 Chester 10.3 Horry 4.5 Cherokee 7.3 Marion 10.9 Newberry 6.4 Abbeville 8.3 Source: SCESC/LMI Less Than 5.0% Compared to August 2006, the unemployment rate fell in 40 of the 46 counties. Greater Than 10.0% 5.0% to 10.0%
    • Unemployment Rates Multi-County Metropolitan Areas September 2006 Source: SCESC/LMI The unemployment rate fell in all four Metropolitan Areas.
    • Unemployment Rates by Workforce Investment Area September 2006 Midlands 5.6 Upper Savannah 7.6 Lower Savannah 8.0 Lowcountry 5.1 Pendleton District 7.1 Greenville 5.3 Trident 5.4 Santee/Lynches 7.6 Waccamaw 5.2 Pee Dee 8.4 Catawba 6.9 Upstate 7.4 Source: SCESC/LMI
    • Unemployment Rates by Workforce Investment Area September 2006 Lowcountry 5.1 Waccamaw 5.2 Source: SCESC/LMI The lowest WIA unemployment rate were recorded in…
    • SC Nonfarm Employment…
    • Employment by Industry
      • By major industry sectors
      • Monthly, by state and metropolitan areas
      • Annually, detailed by county as well
      • Trends important - help to determine declining and growing areas, both by industry and by geography
    • SC Nonfarm Employment Source: SCESC/LMI Nonfarm employment rose by 6,900 jobs to 1,914,800 in September boosted by Local Government Education (+11,700).
    • Greenwood Oconee Anderson Pickens Greenville Spartanburg York Laurens McCormick Edgefield Aiken Lexington Saluda Barnwell Orangeburg Calhoun Allendale Hampton Jasper Beaufort Colleton Bamberg Charleston Dorchester Berkeley Georgetown Williamsburg Clarendon Sumter Florence Dillon Lee Darlington Marlboro Chesterfield Richland Kershaw Fairfield Lancaster Union Chester Horry Cherokee Marion Newberry Abbeville Charleston -1,100 Jobs (0.4%) Columbia +2,300 Jobs (0.6%) Anderson +700 Jobs (1.2%) Florence +1,300 Jobs (1.5%) Greenville +900 Jobs (0.3%) Myrtle Beach -6,300 Jobs (4.9%) Spartanburg +1,200 Jobs (1.0%) Sumter +200 Jobs (0.5%) Source: SCESC/LMI Employment Change by Metropolitan Areas August 2006 – September 2006 Over the month , the Columbia MSA added 2,300 jobs, boosted by Government (+3,100).
    • SC Employment Change for Key Sectors September 2005 – September 2006 Nearly all sectors experienced gains over the year , led by Trade, Transportation and Utilities (+11,600), and Government (+11,200). Source: SCESC/LMI
    • Nonfarm Employment For SC and SE Selected States September 2006 Nonfarm employment in SC surged 2.8% over the past 12 months, which is significantly higher than most states in our region. Additionally, the state experience strong growth in Construction (8.0%), Financial Activities (5.8%), and Leisure and Hospitality (3.8%). 2.8% 1.8% 0.2% 5.9% 1.5% Virginia -1.1% -2.4% -1.5% -1.5% -0.2% -0.4% 0.3% Manufacturing 12-month % change 3.3% 2.0% 3.2% 1.8% Georgia 3.9% 3.6% (not seasonally adj.) 4.1% 1.8% North Carolina 3.2% 3.8% 3.0% 3.7% 2.8% Leisure and Hospitality 12-month % change 5.8% 8.0% 2.8% South Carolina 1.2% 1.0% 2.9% 1.4% Nonfarm Employment 12-month % change 2.7% 2.6% NA 2.9% Construction 12-month % change 0.6% Tennessee 0.5% 2.6% 0.0% Financial Activities 12-month % change Kentucky Florida Alabama State
    • Over the year , 30,600 jobs were created in six of the eight metropolitan areas. A total of 23,400 were created in the non-metropolitan counties of the state. Employment Change by Metropolitan Areas September 2005 – September 2006 Greenwood Oconee Anderson Pickens Greenville Spartanburg York Laurens McCormick Edgefield Aiken Lexington Saluda Barnwell Orangeburg Calhoun Allendale Hampton Jasper Beaufort Colleton Bamberg Charleston Dorchester Berkeley Georgetown Williamsburg Clarendon Sumter Florence Dillon Lee Darlington Marlboro Chesterfield Richland Kershaw Fairfield Lancaster Union Chester Horry Cherokee Marion Newberry Abbeville Charleston +7,500 Jobs (2.7%) Columbia +11,800 Jobs (3.3%) Anderson -1,500 Jobs (2.4%) Florence +3,500 Jobs (4.1%) Greenville +3,300 Jobs (1.1%) Myrtle Beach +2,800 Jobs (2.3%) Spartanburg -1,700 Jobs (1.4%) Sumter +1,700 Jobs (4.1%) Source: SCESC/LMI
    • Other Indicators…
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    • South Carolina Total Employment 13 counties account for 70% of total employment Greenwood Oconee Anderson Pickens Greenville Spartanburg York Laurens McCormick Edgefield Aiken Lexington Saluda Barnwell Orangeburg Calhoun Allendale Hampton Jasper Beaufort Colleton Bamberg Charleston Dorchester Berkeley Georgetown Williamsburg Clarendon Sumter Florence Dillon Lee Darlington Marlboro Chesterfield Richland Kershaw Fairfield Lancaster Union Chester Horry Cherokee Marion Newberry Abbeville
    • SC Population 2000 - 2005 Based on U.S. Census Bureau population estimates as of July 1, 2005, the state’s population stood at 4.26 million, up 1.4% from July 1, 2004. The growth rate was the 12 th fastest in the U.S. Source: U.S. Census Bureau
    • Annual Estimates of the Population in S.C. by Race Alone: As of July 1, 2005 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division August 4, 2006 Blacks continue to be the largest minority group in the state at 1.3 million (29.7%).
    • Foreign-born Population For SC and Selected SE States The US foreign-born population grew by 16% from 2000 – 2005. South Carolina led the nation over this time period, up 48%. Sources: Census Bureau; USA Today +32% Kentucky +22% Florida +30% Alabama +32% North Carolina +39% Georgia +43% Tennessee +48% South Carolina Foreign-born Population Growth 2000 – 2005 State
    • Occupational Wages, Per Capita Income & Poverty Rates
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    • Greenwood Oconee Anderson Pickens Greenville Spartanburg York Laurens McCormick Edgefield Aiken Lexington Saluda Barnwell Orangeburg Calhoun Allendale Hampton Jasper Beaufort Colleton Bamberg Charleston Dorchester Berkeley Georgetown Williamsburg Clarendon Sumter Florence Dillon Lee Darlington Marlboro Chesterfield Richland Kershaw Fairfield Lancaster Union Chester Horry Cherokee Marion Newberry Abbeville Charleston $30,514 Columbia $30,927 Anderson $26,922 Florence $27,217 Greenville $29,636 Myrtle Beach $26,686 Spartanburg $26,710 Sumter $24,482 Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, September 2006 Per Capita Income by Metropolitan Areas 2005 Augusta-Richmond County, GA-SC $28,105 Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC-SC $36,151
    • 2005 Poverty Rates For SC and Selected SE States In 2005, the nation’s poverty rate was 13.3%. Source: Census Bureau 14 14.4% Georgia 13 15.1% North Carolina 15.5% 15.6% 16.8% 17.0% 19.8% 21.3% Percent 12 11 9 8 2 1 Rank Alabama Tennessee South Carolina Kentucky Louisiana Mississippi State
    • SC Poverty Rates By Race and Hispanic Origin 2005 Source: Census Bureau 29.0% Hispanic origin (any race) 14.0% Asian 26.9% African American 9.8% White, not Hispanic Poverty Rate Race and Hispanic Origin
    • SC Poverty Rates By Educational Attainment 2005 Source: Census Bureau 3.4% Bachelor’s degree or higher 7.7% Some college, associate’s degree 12.9% High school graduate 25.9% Less than high school graduate Poverty Rate Educational Attainment (Population 25 years and older)
    • Contact LMI South Carolina Employment Security Commission Labor Market Information Department (803) 737-2660 or 1-800-205-9290 www.sces.org/lmi Mike Daniels: [email_address]