Week 2 Organisational Behaviour Presentation

4,926 views
4,718 views

Published on

Week 2 Organisational Behaviour Presentation

Published in: Education
1 Comment
7 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • VERY good power point presentation
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,926
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
239
Comments
1
Likes
7
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Week 2 Organisational Behaviour Presentation

  1. 1. Organisational Behaviour<br />Week 2 Business IT/Systems<br />
  2. 2. Presentation Reading <br />This presentation is based on Chapter 2 of Laurie J. Mullins book on Management and Organisational Behaviour<br />This can be accessed in the University Library on shelf number:<br />658.4 MUL<br />
  3. 3. What is Organisational Behaviour<br />Organisations can’t exist without the people who work within them<br />Understanding the behaviour of people within organisations is essential in the modern business world<br />Organisational Behaviour is the study of individual and group behaviour, and patterns of structure in order to help improve organisational performance and effectiveness <br />Does NOT replace Management Theory, but has a close relationship with it <br />
  4. 4. Why Study OB, I thought this was a course on Business IT ?<br />Chris Argyris (1964) Integrating the Individual and the Organisation, John Wiley and Sons <br />‘Organisations are extremely complex systems. As one observes them they seem to be composed of human activities on many different levels of analysis. Personalities, small groups, intergroups, norms, values, attitudes all seem to exist in an extremely complex multidimensional pattern. The complexity seems at times almost beyond comprehension.’<br />
  5. 5. To Understand OB you need...<br />To Understand:<br />The Behaviour of People<br />The Process of Management<br />The Organisational Context<br />The Organisational Processes and Execution of Work<br />Interactions with External Environment<br />
  6. 6. A Framework for OB<br />
  7. 7. Wilson, argues...<br />F. M. Wilson, (1999) Organisational Behaviour: A Critical Introduction, Oxford University Press<br />We need a wider view of organisational behaviour<br />We need to take into consideration:<br />Rest and Play<br />Emotion and Feeling<br />Definitions of men’s or women’s work<br />The meaning of work for the Unemployed<br />Moonlighting<br />
  8. 8. Influences on OB<br />The Individual:<br />Work in Isolation or as part of a Group<br />Respond to Organisation expectations or influences of the external environment<br />Incompatibility between individual needs and the demands of the organisation, can lead to frustration and conflict<br />Management needs to balance satisfaction of individual needs and the attainment of organisational goals<br />
  9. 9. Influences on OB<br />The Group:<br />Formal groups constructed by the organisation<br />Informal groups arising from social needs<br />Groups can develop own hierarchies and leaders<br />Group pressure on individual behaviour<br />Complements our understanding of Individual behaviour<br />
  10. 10. Influences on OB<br />The Group:<br />Formal groups constructed by the organisation<br />Informal groups arising from social needs<br />Groups can develop own hierarchies and leaders<br />Group pressure on individual behaviour<br />Complements our understanding of Individual behaviour<br />
  11. 11. Influences on OB<br />The Organisation:<br />Creates structure through which management can establish relationships between individuals and groups<br />A formal structure to achieve aims and objectives<br />Behaviour is affected by the formal structuring of an organisation through their:<br />Technology usage<br />Styles of leadership<br />Systems of management<br />Process planning, direction and controls <br />
  12. 12. Influences on OB<br />The Environment:<br />The affects can be:<br />Technological and scientific developments<br />Economic activity<br />Social and cultural influences<br />Governmental actions<br />Relates to the management of opportunity and risk<br />Globalisation means that organisations need to respond to multiple markets and local requirements<br />
  13. 13. The 3 Disciplines of OB<br />
  14. 14. The Psychology of OB<br />The study of human behaviour within the individual and small groups<br />Focus on the individual as a whole person, in what can be termed the ‘personality system’<br />Interested in individual perceptions, attitudes and motivations<br />
  15. 15. The Sociology of OB<br />The study of social behaviour, relationships among social groups and societies, and the maintenance of order<br />Focus of attention on social structures and positions in those structures<br />Interested in the relationship between leaders and followers<br />
  16. 16. The Anthropology of OB<br />The study of humankind and human behaviour as a whole<br />Focus on the cultural system, the beliefs, customs, ideas and values within a group or society, and their comparisons between different cultures<br />People depend on their culture for security and stability, so changes in environment can lead to adverse effects<br />
  17. 17. The Organisational Iceberg<br />
  18. 18.
  19. 19. Morgan’s Metaphors<br />G. Morgan, (1997) Images of Organization, Second Edition, Sage Publications<br />Organisations are complex so useful to have metaphors to help identify different types<br />Morgan uses 8 different metaphors<br />
  20. 20. Morgan’s Metaphors: 1<br />Machines<br />Efficient operation in a routine, reliable and predictable way<br />Bureaucratic structure provides form, continuity and security<br />Function best in stable and protected environments <br />
  21. 21. Morgan’s Metaphors: 2<br />Organisms<br />Organisation as a ‘living system’<br />An open system, able to adapt quickly to a changing environment <br />Best when working in a turbulent and dynamic environment<br />
  22. 22. Morgan’s Metaphors: 3<br />Brains<br />Seen as inventive and rational, for flexible and creative actions<br />Capable of intelligent change<br />
  23. 23. Morgan’s Metaphors: 4<br />Cultures<br />Complex systems<br />Contain their own ideology, values, rituals and systems of belief and practice<br /> Evolve variations through social development<br />
  24. 24. Morgan’s Metaphors: 5<br />Political Systems<br />Focused on keeping order and directing people<br />Defined by authority, power, superior-subordinate relationships<br />
  25. 25. Morgan’s Metaphors: 6<br />Psychic Prisons<br />Organisations can become trapped by constructions of reality<br />Their inherited or mythical past affects their representation to the outside world<br />Can be used as a tool to explore the reality and illusions of organisational behaviour<br />
  26. 26. Morgan’s Metaphors: 7<br />Flux and Transformation<br />Their is always flux and transformation <br />Organisations will always be dealing with these processes<br />We need to understand the sources and logic of transformation and change<br />
  27. 27. Morgan’s Metaphors: 8<br />Instruments of Domination<br />Associated with processes of social domination, groups and individuals imposing their will on others<br />The pursuit of goals determined by the few, but implemented by the many<br /> Defined by the relationship between the modes of social domination and the control of their members<br />
  28. 28. The Work Ethic<br />Goldthorpe, J. H. Et al (1968) The Affluent Worker, Cambridge University Press <br />Instrumental: A means to an end, a calculative and economic involvement, clear distinction between work and non-work related activities<br />Bureaucratic: Sense of obligation to work, a positive involvement in career progression, close link between work and non-work related activities<br />Soldieristic: Ego involvement with work groups rather than organisation, non-work activities linked to work relationships <br />
  29. 29.
  30. 30. The People-Organisation <br />The majority of people want to do a ‘good job’<br />People respond to how they are treated<br />Performance is affected by how staff perceive their treatment by management<br />Not always what is done by management, but by the way it is done that affects performance<br />Managers have to consider; work environment, systems of motivation, job satisfaction and rewards<br />People and organisations need each other<br />
  31. 31. The Psychological Contract<br />Not a written document<br />Mutual expectations and satisfaction of needs from the people-organisation relationship<br />Covers a range of expectations of rights and privileges, duties and obligations<br />Involves a process of giving and receiving by the individual and the organisation <br />
  32. 32. Finding a Balance<br />Stalker, K, ‘The Individual, the organisation and the Psychological Contract’, The Institute of Administrative Management, July/August 2000, pp. 28-34 <br />Caring: genuine concern for staff well-being<br />Communicating: talk about what the company is hoping to achieve<br />Listening: need to hear what is really being said<br />Knowing: the individuals, their families, personal wishes, desires and ambitions<br />Rewarding: not always money, a genuine thank you or public recognition<br />

×