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Customer service training general

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  • 1. Customer Service Training To enhance customer service skills to be integrated into daily work activities Presented by Joyce Lewis-Andrews
  • 2. Creating a Customer-Centric Training Environment● Listen. Ensure good 2-way communication.● Give your undivided attention.● Appreciate every ones individuality.● Honor our time together.● Be honest. It’s okay to say “I don’t know”.● Know how to apologize.
  • 3. Creating a Customer-Centric Training Environment● Make the day rewarding for your fellow participants. Be flexible.● Make the effort to do things right the first time. Ask for clarification or help when you need it.● Dont assign blame or feel the need to offer excuses.● Be an advocate for improving customer service at your company.
  • 4. Definition of Customer Service
  • 5. Definition of Customer Service … the art of building relationships with new orexisting customers, solidifying the loyalty of wavering customers and recovering defecting customers.
  • 6. Customer Rights● Right to negotiate● Right to have an opinion● Right to question● Right to make an informed decision● Right to expect high standards and quality● Right to feel personally rewarded● Right to enjoy customized experiences● Right to be delighted
  • 7. Types of CustomersNew & Existing Customers Wavering Customers Defecting Customers
  • 8. Types of Customers NEW & EXISTING CUSTOMERSThose who expect to be satisfied. They’regiving our company a chance to do businesswith them. They may also come to us withproblems, but are really hoping that we canhelp them find some solutions.
  • 9. Five Keys to Becoming a SolutionCreator with New/Existing Customers 1. Explain who you and your company are and your dedication to helping them find a solution to their situation.
  • 10. Five Keys to Becoming a SolutionCreator with New/Existing Customers 1. Explain who you and your company are and your dedication to helping them find a solution to their situation. 2. Be sure you’re clear on the situation.
  • 11. Five Keys to Becoming a SolutionCreator with New/Existing Customers 1. Explain who you and your company are and your dedication to helping them find a solution to their situation. 2. Be sure you’re clear on the situation. 3. Learn what solution the customer is seeking.
  • 12. Five Keys to Becoming a SolutionCreator with New/Existing Customers 1. Explain who you and your company are and your dedication to helping them find a solution to their situation. 2. Be sure you’re clear on the situation. 3. Learn what solution the customer is seeking. 4. Describe an available or customized solution and explain how it meets with your customer’s expectations.
  • 13. Five Keys to Becoming a SolutionCreator with New/Existing Customers 1. Explain who you and your company are and your dedication to helping them find a solution to their situation. 2. Be sure you’re clear on the situation. 3. Learn what solution the customer is seeking. 4. Describe an available or customized solution and explain how it meets with your customer’s expectations. 5. Solicit feedback on the solution and your Solution Creator abilities.
  • 14. #1 TRUE OR FALSE New and Existing Customersare more easily satisfied if their expectations are effectively managed.
  • 15. TRUEIf customers know exactly what to expect, they are more likely to be satisfied. Dont make empty promises or set unrealistic expectations justbecause you think its what the customer wants to hear.
  • 16. #2 TRUE OR FALSENew and Existing Customerswho are frustrated need to begiven an immediate solution.
  • 17. FALSE If a customer is frustrated, itsimportant to ask questions and listen effectively so that thecorrect solution can be found to avoid additional frustration.
  • 18. Types of Customers WAVERING CUSTOMERSThose that, for what ever reason, aren’t 100%satisfied with us. They have their doubts, butare willing to bring the problem to our attentionand/or give us another chance.
  • 19. #1 TRUE OR FALSEMost Wavering Customers whoare upset will calm down if you offer them a sincere apology.
  • 20. TRUE Most customers who are complaining want you toacknowledge that theyve been disappointed and want you to express regret.
  • 21. #2 TRUE OR FALSEWhen dealing with a WaveringCustomer face-to-face, its bestto avoid eye contact in order to appear less aggressive and confrontational.
  • 22. FALSE While this may feel more comfortable for you, the customer will interpret itnegatively—either as a lack of interest, confidence or as defensiveness.
  • 23. #3 TRUE OR FALSE The only time when it is appropriate to hang up on acustomer is when theyre being abusive or threatening.
  • 24. FALSEIf a customer becomes abusive or threatening, tell them that youd like to help, but can only do so effectively when the conversational tone is calm.
  • 25. #4 TRUE OR FALSE Companies earn more trustfrom Wavering Customers who receive resolution for problems... than from new orexisting customers who havent had any problems at all.
  • 26. TRUEIts not the absence of problems that develops trust, but your reaction (not excuses) when things go wrong. Customers want to know that, no matter what, you care about them and their business.
  • 27. Types of Customers DEFECTING CUSTOMERSThose who really do not want to do businesswith us at all. Something has gone wrong. Oursystems have let them down, and so we mustbe willing to work extra hard to prove ourselvesand repair the relationship (whenever possible).
  • 28. #1 TRUE OR FALSE When you answer a call, and the customer really needs to resolve an issue with another department, its yourresponsibility to make sure the customer reaches someone who can help.
  • 29. TRUECustomers are relying upon you to be their “guide” within your organization. By notabandoning them, you can limit your number of Defecting Customers.
  • 30. #1 TRUE OR FALSE 96% of dissatisfied customers never complain. They just stopdoing business with a company.
  • 31. TRUE Its more important for businesses to know aboutdissatisfaction so that customer complaints can be effectively addressed.
  • 32. #2 TRUE OR FALSE On average, a satisfiedcustomer tells 3 people about a good experience, while theaverage dissatisfied one gripes to 11 people.
  • 33. TRUEThe most positive, credible and affordable advertising comes from word-of-mouth of our satisfied customers.
  • 34. What Customers Desire From Us● Relability – We say what well do, when well do it--and we mean it!● Respect – We believe customers are our greatest asset.● Reassurance – We are willing to learn from our mistakes and continually make improvements to be their company of choice.
  • 35. What Customers Desire From Us● Relability – We say what well do, when well do it--and we mean it!● Respect – We believe customers are our greatest asset.● Reassurance – We are willing to learn from our mistakes and continually make improvements to be their company of choice.
  • 36. CONFLICTIf you understood everything I said, you’d beme. – Miles DavisHonest disagreement is often a good sign ofprogress - Mohandas K. GandhiThe quality of our lives depends not on whetheror not we have conflicts, but on how werespond to them. – Tom Crum
  • 37. Customers and Conflict● Conflict can occur when the customer’s timeline doesn’t match with ours or when information is miscommunicated.● Conflict can occur when there are strong, opposing opinions about how a service should be delivered or of a desired outcome.● Conflict can occur when a customer feels disrespected, ignored, threatened, intimidated, humiliated or unappreciated.
  • 38. Customers and Conflict● Conflicts can occur in any situation that is stressful, confusing, unmanageable or uncontrollable.● Conflicts can occur when it is perceived that barriers have been created that interfere with personal pursuits of success, rewards or resources.● Conflicts can occur when there are grievances, accusations, or judgements directed against another person’s personality, actions, behaviors or values.
  • 39. Tools to Assist When Managing Conflict with Customers● Customer Rights● 3 Rs – Respect, Reliability and Reassurance● Five Keys to Being a Solution Creator● Other “Commandments” of Customer Service● Healthy Responses to Conflict
  • 40. 10 Commandments of Customer Service1. Provide every customer with the rights theydeserve.2. Know who is the boss. Offer customers respect,reliability and reassurance at all times.3. Give each customer your undivided attention.Use your Five Keys to Becoming a Solution Creator.4. Customers are individuals. Learn her name anduse it.5. Be honest. Don’t make empty promises.
  • 41. 10 Commandments of Customer Service6. Honor a customer’s time. Be prompt andresponsive.7. Know how to apologize.8. Say and do things right the first time.9. Manage conflict in positive, healthy ways.10. Don’t assign blame or shame or flimsy excuses.
  • 42. Healthy & Unhealthy Responses to Conflict● A belief that facing ● A fear and avoidance of conflict is in everyones situations that may spark best interests. conflict.
  • 43. Healthy & Unhealthy Responses to Conflict● A belief that facing ● A fear and avoidance of conflict is in everyones situations that may spark best interests. conflict.● Calm, non-defensive and ● Explosive, angry and respectful reactions. resentful feelings.
  • 44. Healthy & Unhealthy Responses to Conflict● A belief that facing ● A fear and avoidance of conflict is in everyones situations that may spark best interests. conflict.● Calm, non-defensive and ● Explosive, angry and respectful reactions. resentful feelings.● The ability to seek ● Rigid, steadfast understanding and behaviors or opinions identify opportunities for and desire to “win”. compromise.
  • 45. Healthy & Unhealthy Responses to Conflict● A belief that facing ● A fear and avoidance of conflict is in everyones situations that may spark best interests. conflict.● Calm, non-defensive and ● Explosive, angry and respectful reactions. resentful feelings.● The ability to seek ● Rigid, steadfast understanding and behaviors or opinions identify opportunities for and desire to “win”. compromise. ● An inability to recognize● Taking a step back to or respond to the things see the situation from that matter to other another point of view. people.
  • 46. Phone Tips for Good Customer Service1. Start with enthusiasm. Be sure to smile.2. Offer a warm greeting or opening.3. Introduce yourself.4. Dont let customers wait. Control the holdbutton.5. Transfer only once.6. Use active listening skills to understand whatthe customer wants.
  • 47. Phone Tips for Good Customer Service7. Avoid company jargon, acronyms or technicalterminology to be sure the customer understandsyou.8. Always act professionally.9. Thank customers and make them feelimportant.10. Say goodbye and have a strong closing bysoliciting feedback on the summary of the call.
  • 48. 6 Opportunities to Foster Good Customer Service1. Initial Contact – the customer is contacting usfor a service or asking for an answer2. Prodding – the customer is letting us know thatthey’re waiting for a response to their initialcontact3. Resolution – the customer receives the serviceor information they require
  • 49. 6 Opportunities to Foster Good Customer Service4. Feedback – the customer is reporting on theservice they received5. Complaint – the customer is expressingdissatisfaction6. Follow-up – Companies learn more about thecustomer’s experience and/or tracks theirsatisfaction level
  • 50. Types of CustomersNew & Existing Customers Wavering Customers Defecting Customers Potential Customers
  • 51. POTENTIAL CUSTOMERSOur contacts, vendors, suppliers, friends, familymembers, donors, or community members--anyone in our personal or professionalnetworks who might, in the near or distantfuture, have the opportunity to take advantageof the programs and services of our company tosatisfy their needs and wants; and who has thepotential to sustain the future of our businessthrough their customer involvement.
  • 52. Your Customer Service Tookit● Customer Rights● 3 Rs – Respect, Reliability and Reassurance● Five Keys to Being a Solution Creator● 10 “Commandments” of Customer Service● Healthy Responses to Conflict● Phone Tips for Good Customer Service● Your Company Customer Service Philosophy
  • 53. Your Customer Service Philosophy● If your company has a Customer Service Philosophy, what actions are needed to make it resonate more soundly throughout the organization?● What elements from todays workshop would you like to include in your Customer Service Philosphy?● How will you share your Customer Service Philosophy with internal and external customers?
  • 54. The best way to serve your customersis to enjoy and take pride in your work. Thank You!