Using new technologies in the he classroom

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  • From: http://www.toowaydirect.com/2012/01/new-ofcom-stats-show-huge-growth-in-online-shopping/Smartphone ownership almost doubled in the UK between February 2010 and August 2011 (up from 24% to 46%)The number of people using their mobiles to access the internet was also higher in the UK with nearly half (46%) of UK internet users using their phones to go online in October 2011.A quarter (25%) of UK mobile users accessed news content on their mobiles, significantly higher than in other European countries. This could be partly due to higher smartphone take-up and UK media and newspaper websites having dedicated mobile websites.
  • The rate of technological development is phenomenal. The majority of learners now come to the classroom with a small computer within their pocket.How should these be managed in the classroom?
  • Lower order thinking skills, Higher order thinking skills
  • http://www.itslifejimbutnotasweknowit.org.uk/files/Coffield_IfOnly.pdfJerome Bruner reminds us that ‘we are the only species that teaches in anysignificant way’ (1996: xi, original emphasis) and that, in treating teachersas a necessary evil, ‘we have probably alienated our most important ally inrenewal’ (ibid: 84).Forme, T & L is collaborative, reflective, purposeful, open-ended, lifelongand, above all, based on trusting relationships. Education, however, is abroader and more significant concept than T & L. Again, Bruner, for me,sums up the argument well:...education is not simply a technical business of well-managedinformation processing, nor even simply a matter of applying ‘learningtheories’ to the classroom or using the results of subject-centred‘achievement testing’. It is a complex pursuit of fitting a culture to theneeds of its members and of fitting its members and their ways ofknowing to the needs of the culture.
  • Using new technologies in the he classroom

    1. 1. Using new technologies in the HE classroom Steve Saffhill, AdvisorGo to View > Header & Footer to editwww.jiscrsc.ac.uk/eastmidlands November 22, 2012 | slide 1 RSCs – Stimulating and supporting innovation in learning
    2. 2. Summary• The future workforce• The learners’ potential• Knowing what your learners know• Working together• Critical thinking November 22, 2012 | slide 2
    3. 3. Stages of manufacturing Raw Final Processingmaterials product November 22, 2012 | slide 3
    4. 4. The learners’ journeyRaw materials Processing Final product Learners Learning Skilled with Skills Experience Workforceand Abilities November 22, 2012 | slide 4
    5. 5. Skilled workforce: the future of British industry Government objectives – Creative – Social mobility – “Wants industry to work together and with learning organisations to improve productivity and efficiency” – “Many of our students’ future jobs will involve some level of crowdsourcing or collaboration” November 22, 2012 | slide 5
    6. 6. Learners with great skills and abilities November 22, 2012 | slide 6
    7. 7. Changes in commerce 99% of 15-24 YO have a mobile phone Rural broadband penetration is 84% (OFCOM, Jan 2012) Smartphone ownership doubles from 2011-2012 Half of internet access was via mobile (Oct 2011) Quarter of mobile users access news content November 22, 2012 | slide 7
    8. 8. What’s in your learners’ pocket? Mobile device usage Benefit or distraction? Follow them and lead them
    9. 9. Common issues with learning Diagnostic assessment Gathering evidence Working together Critical thinking November 22, 2012 | slide 9
    10. 10. It is hard to continually assess what learners know and understand Diagnostics – http://moodle.rsc-em.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=272
    11. 11. Quiz ShowQuestion and AnswerSamples and Techniques
    12. 12. Declan Donnelly’s family is Irish
    13. 13. What part of Newcastle was Byker Grove based in?JarrowWallsendBykerGroveSunderland
    14. 14. Diagnostics November 22, 2012 | slide 14
    15. 15. SocrativeSocrative November 22, 2012 | slide 15
    16. 16. Other diagnostic ideaswww.classtools.net http://www.stixy.com/guest/157028 http://www.ibrainstormapp.com/
    17. 17. Keeping your powerpoint slides fresh Using twitter to get the most up to date news
    18. 18. Twitter
    19. 19. Gathering evidenceApps November 22, 2012 | slide 19
    20. 20. EvernoteNovember 22, 2012 | slide 20
    21. 21. Images and video Skitch Coach’s EyeImages and video November 22, 2012 | slide 21
    22. 22. Moodle (2.1)Moodle 2.1 November 22, 2012 | slide 22
    23. 23. Bloom’s Taxonomy CreatingHOTS Evaluating Analysingto ApplyingLOTS Understanding Remembering
    24. 24. A digital taxonomy
    25. 25. Bloom’s iPad taxonomy
    26. 26. Going from LOTS to HOTS SMART Boards Mindmaps/argument maps Coaching instead of teaching Text chat
    27. 27. Manufacturing of reflective evidence November 22, 2012 | slide 28
    28. 28. Video150 Video tools November 22, 2012 | slide 29
    29. 29. Argument mapping A claim supported by a reason is called a contention
    30. 30. Improving retention and achievement: use your VLE It’s a powerpoint dumping ground!
    31. 31. Pull Getting people to go to the VLE – Referring to it (verbally, footer) – URL shortener – QR codes From http://moodle.rsc- em.ac.uk/course/view.ph p?id=272 to bit.ly/he-in-fe
    32. 32. Stick Empower them Mix it up with interactivity – A place for them to test themselves – A place to test their new knowledge – A place to share
    33. 33. November 22, 2012 | slide ‹#›
    34. 34. Finally• a technical business of • a complex pursuit of well-managed fitting a culture to the information processing needs of its members• nor even simply a matter • and of fitting its of applying ‘learning members and their ways theories’ to the of knowing to the needs classroom of the culture.• or using the results of subject-centred (Bruner, 1996 as cited by ‘achievement testing’. Coffield 2008) November 22, 2012 | slide 36

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