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Mobile inclusion

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  • If you stop watching or recording TV programmes please let us know
  • Aakash £22.50
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  • Http://www.jisc.ac.uk/inform/inform31/MobileLearning.html Although resources adapted to run on a mobile device are more limited in terms of their sophistication it is important not to underestimate the value of mobile learning in terms of its portability, availability and instant access. Where the design of learning materials has effectively separated content from presentation it should be relatively easy to create a ‘mobile friendly’ version of the main content. This may lack some of the functionality of the main product but contain the key information in a much more portable format. Mobile devices have their own accessibility issues – both positive and negative – but a mobile friendly version of the key learning content can significantly broaden the scope and usefulness of the materials at little extra cost if it is planned from the start. It may also serve as a content overview or revision package.
  • Aakash £22.50
  • Kibera TV Jove.com Sugata Mitra http://www.internetevangelismday.com/blog/archives/5916
  • Accessibility and mobile and wireless technologies both benefits and constraints. As the range of possible disabilities is wide, it is important to gauge the accessibility of any activity using mobile devices in the light of individual needs. Benefits: advantages to learners with disabilities: Participation in activities that might otherwise be inaccessible. Portable access to appropriately designed e-learning resources. Avoidance of some of the self-image problems associated with assistive technologies. Opportunities for self-paced use of learning resources in any context. assist with time management, calendar, clock, to-do list, alarm and notepad functions. Mind-mapping software, handwriting recognition, word prediction and spellchecking, portable keypads and onscreen keyboards Voice recording and camera facilities. Dyslexic learners: multimedia options eg audio clips, animations, video clips or text-to-speech. SMS messaging and email can help deaf learners work on collaborative tasks on an almost equal footing with their non-signing peers. Bluetoothing for collaborative tasks. Constraints VI and motor coordination : Small screen devices and the limited options for altering text sizes, colours and backgrounds. Cognitive difficulties or visual impairment, may also find the non-intuitive interfaces of many mobile devices difficult to use. TechDis recommendations on accessibility and mobile and wireless technologies: Explore the benefits of mobile and wireless learning - the wider the repertoire of skills a practitioner can develop, the more adaptable (and potentially accessible) their practice will be. When choosing any hardware or software, make accessibility one of the key purchasing criteria. Make sure your choice works for as many learners as possible. Consider accessibility whenever designing a learning activity and discuss any doubts about individuals' ability to access the activity in advance. This gives you the opportunity to adapt the approach or provide those learners with a different pathway to the same learning experience. Encourage learners to feedback on the accessibility of learning activities. It is not possible to add equal value all the time, so be prepared to add value differently to different groups at different times. There is never a 'one size fits all' solution.
  • Thanet Learner Entitlement list . This also works as a good marketing tool (what you get if you study with us) as well as preventing the hostage to fortune stuff of offering technologies that become outdated or are replaced without notice. It is an excellent reminder of what technology brings to teaching and learning.     1. The ability to access learning and teaching from outside college at times to suit the student 2. Able to contact a tutor for help between set times 3. Learners are able to submit work remotely where the course allows it 4. Students can continue to learn during periods of agreed absence 5. Staff and students can bring their own hardware and social media sites to their teaching and learning 6. Where desirable, learners will use their own software and hardware to access teaching, and demonstrate learning. 7. Learners will have access to a range of specific and wider learning resources in support of their specific and general learning 8. Students will have a sense of learning being tailored to meet their personal needs and preferences in collaboration with course tutors 9. Each learner will have access to on-line personal learning space
  • confidence and independence can be increased, efficiency and continuity of care improved, and even something that was previously a challenge made achievable.   Why buy a smartphone? http://www.internetevangelismday.com/blog/archives/4614 Quick fire-up easier to use than the old button-operated phones. as dramatic as old DOS computers v Windows. operation is intuitive and web/computer-like. Not complex - intuitive Texting, calendars, diaries, time alerts/alarm clocks, and address books are all quick and easy. Access to the Web is practical and simple. Even with PAYG, access the Web and many other services in any wifi area, free. vast numbers of ‘apps’ eg Android Market Always read the reviews before installing. Some apps may be incompatible with some phones. Unreliable phone behavior is often caused by a recently-installed app. camera/camcorder and easy-to-use picture gallery. write notes ( ‘sync’ to your computer), record voice memos, etc install the Kindle app - many free classics. Amazon also gives you the opportunity to convert PDF files into Kindle files, making them more readable. install sat-nav app –  CoPilot   GPS to show you where you are - integrates with Google Maps . Tweet, email, or access Facebook MP3 player – music, audiobooks and podcasts wherever you go. FM radio is a frequent option too. download video clips SIM-free smartphones new or second-hand. If you do not make many phone-calls, you can use PAYG, otherwise look for a cheap contract where you can use your own phone. Be aware though that a smartphone set to access the Web, via the mobile signal rather than wifi, will be constantly searching for emails and many other types of updates, and gobbling up a large amount of bandwidth – ensure that any contract provides sufficient. Many available on eBay, from people selling unwanted contract upgrades (on which the warranty will likely be transferable). With  due caution , bargains. Note that phone unlocking, unless done by the manufacturer, invalidates the warranty. Other advice Go for the largest screen you can afford – it really does make a difference. Some people struggle with an on-screen keyboard, others love them. You have two options here: a) get a ‘capacative screen stylus’ eg BoxWave. b) Alternatively, choose a slide-out phone with a real querty keyboard. Each type needs practice. Read online reviews before buying, such as  TechRadar  and  CNET . Smartphones are power-hungry, and usually need recharging once a day, depending on usage. Learn the tricks for power-saving, and keep a keyring emergency phone charger with you – these contain a single AA battery and will power your phone for a bonus period. Or buy a second battery for your phone and keep it charged up.
  • confidence and independence can be increased, efficiency and continuity of care improved, and even Something that was previously a challenge made achievable. 30 things you can do with a mobile phone...   1.Make a phone call 2.Send a text message 3.Take a picture 4.Do a voice recording 5.Capture video 6.Form a mini-network 7.Listen to music, mp3 player 8.Browse the internet 9.Games 10.Store files 11.Calculator 12.Address book 13.Notes 14.Reminders 15.Calendar 16.Stopwatch 17.Pay for parking 18.Clock/watch/alarm clock 19.Answering machine / voicemail 20.Submit a bid on ebay 21.Torchlight 22.Blogging 23.video player 24.sat nav / gps 25.store pin numbers 26.read a book 27.conference call 28.listen to the radio 29.watch tv 30.remote control
  • confidence and independence can be increased, efficiency and continuity of care improved, and even Something that was previously a challenge made achievable. 30 things you can do with a mobile phone...   1.Make a phone call 2.Send a text message 3.Take a picture 4.Do a voice recording 5.Capture video 6.Form a mini-network 7.Listen to music, mp3 player 8.Browse the internet 9.Games 10.Store files 11.Calculator 12.Address book 13.Notes 14.Reminders 15.Calendar 16.Stopwatch 17.Pay for parking 18.Clock/watch/alarm clock 19.Answering machine / voicemail 20.Submit a bid on ebay 21.Torchlight 22.Blogging 23.video player 24.sat nav / gps 25.store pin numbers 26.read a book 27.conference call 28.listen to the radio 29.watch tv 30.remote control
  • confidence and independence can be increased, efficiency and continuity of care improved, and even something that was previously a challenge made achievable. Learners using their own hardware Gordon Milner 6/2011 Issues Will all students want to bring in their own device for fear of theft, bullying, getting broken? What about digital exclusion ? Some students can’t afford their own personal devices Devices are personal and will usually contain a great deal of personal data and information. Could this personal data be compromised during everyday use in a formal education context? Is it ethical or desirable to ask students who have purchased their personal devices, to use them for purposes they may not have expected them to be used ? What about wear and tear , or accidental damage of the devices during learning? Who would pay for replacement or repair, or insure the devices during these kind of activities. Supporting the range of devices, is more technical staffing needed? Security of network Legitimate use of device whether using network connection or own connection Needing appropriate actions in place in case of breach of “ responsible use policy ” Expense of managed wireless network and continual virus checks/updates of devices Separate areas of network may need setting up and what type of access are you allowing to devices. Everything including work area… or internet and email only?? Do students have their own work area, perhaps cloud-based? JANET acceptable use Are there more opportunities for learning spaces? What about charging facilities for batteries? Who’s responsibility? What about printing? Do they need to print?     Benefits It fits in with the learner’s way of life “ Martini” learning and improved “ownership” of their learning 24/7 access Learners take photographs, record sounds and videos on trips or in the classroom. Geotagging is now a possibility Flexibility and choice seem to be key, and link in with the idea of enabling and encouraging creativity. Better communication … assignment submissions, deadlines and announcements, SMS notifications of closures/timetable changes, keeping potential students “warm” before they start. Use SMS positively and supportively as well as for chasing. Allow learners to subscribe to SMS, giving them choice which is empowering Learners taking notes in class, photos of board, copy/paste into assignments. Learners can carry around electronic versions of their handouts, PPTs, etc all the time, also becomes searchable compared to paper. Also made available in different formats, eg. Audio/video/text, thus they can be more inclusive  
  • Does it support me? (accessible content) Can I work it? (accessible interface) Do I value it? (cultural capital, using 'cool tools') Does it engage me? (accessible task)   Learners with low values (eg plotting in the coloured circle) will have less accessible experiences but may still have a net benefit compared to other types of learning.  accessibility needs to be seen in relation to: CONTEXT The whole learner experience – what they do and how they do it. The alternative learner experiences – what they would otherwise do to achieve the same learning objectives. The alternative resources – whether m-learning offers more flexibility than traditional resources or pedagogies eg handouts. http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/techdis/pages/detail/floating_pages/A_Model_of_Accessible_m-learning
  • NB other tablets are available AAC hardware - will we continue to invest in expensive AAC equipment like VOCAs and DAISY players when the iPad is available? VoiceOver Listening to elements of iPhone home page To hear what is on his iPhone screen, drags finger over different parts of the screen and VoiceOver describes each item under finger Listening to the content of one specific application read/listen to text messages double-tap messages tap each message to hear it being read out Listening to content on Safari web browser move finger along the screen. a blank part of the screen - a clicking sound, onto a button or onto text element, will read out the content. To read everything on his screen flick two fingers across the screen will read all the text elements and also read the navigation elements of screen (such as forward, bookmarks etc). VoiceOver gestures allow a variety of different actions to be performed. In the VoiceOver section of the iPhone there is a place where users can practice/master the features before using them on the iPhone.
  • http://learninginhand.com/do Classroom iPod touches & iPads: Dos and Don'ts iPod touch but the same advice goes for iPad and iPhone. The list is for large or small class sets of handhelds; if students are using their own personal iPods there’s a different set of considerations and technical issues to deal with.   Dos Do sync all iPods to one computer.   You can add media to one computer's iTunes Library and know that it will sync with all iPods. The one computer you sync with can be Windows or Macintosh. Some people report that Windows computers freeze when syncing more than a few iPods at once. Macs appear to work better at syncing multiple iPods.   Do name iPods . The first time you sync an iPod you are prompted to give it a name in iTunes. Start the name with a number so iPods are listed in order under the Devices list. Include a zero in front of number 1-9 so the computers sure to list them correctly. You can always change an iPod's name anytime using iTunes.   Do set each device's wallpaper with a number or name.  An innovative way to identify iPods touches is to set the wallpaper image of each device to include its number or a name. This way you can simply press the Home button and the screen instantly lights up and displays the device's number. Wallpaper can be any image that's in the Photos app. That includes images synced using iTunes or images saved from mobile Safari or other apps. I've made three sets of images that you're welcome to use as wallpaper.    Do set iPods for automatic sync of all content.  Configure each iPod to sync all audio, video, podcasts, and apps so that everything in the iTunes Library is automatically transferred. No buttons to push or click. Simply plugging in the iPod will ensure that everything in the iTunes Library is synced onto the iPod.  Each iPod will have to be configured separately in iTunes.   Do make playlists.  Because everything in the computer's iTunes Library will be synced onto the iPods, it's a good idea to organize what you want students to access into playlists. Do this by click the + in the bottom-left of the iTunes windows. Name your playlist and then drag and drop audio, video, podcasts, and audiobooks onto it. You can click and drag to reorder items within a playlist. Upon next sync, the playlist will appear.   Do delete content . Since you are mirroring the computer's iTunes Library onto the iPods, deleting items from iTunes will delete them from the iPods. After you no longer have a need for a podcast, video, or audiobook, delete it so it is not taking up room and cluttering up the iPods. Chances are you want to use this content with a future class. If it's something you will use again, drag and drop it into a folder on your desktop. You can drag and drop it back into iTunes for the next time you want it synced to iPods.   Do configure the Music app for easy access to playlists and podcasts . I wish the Music app on iPod touch was named Audio instead because that is where you listen to any audio and access podcasts. As its name suggests, the app is set up for listening to songs. With a few changes, you can make it easier for students access educational content on the iPod. First, launch the Music app and tap the  More  button. Then tap  Edit . Drag the Playlists, Podcasts,and iTunes U buttons to the bottom of the screen. If you use audiobooks you can drag that too. You'll need to do this on each iPod touch (or better yet have students do it). Now when the Music app is launched, students have quick one-tap access to whatever buttons you added to the bottom of the screen.   Do label or engrave iPods . It's important for teachers and students to be able to identify iPods. Giving iPods numbers is helpful. Engrave numbers on the iPods' backs. Unfortunately, this number cannot be seen when the iPod is in a protective case. Putting a sticker on the front or writing the number on the case is helpful. Be sure the number matches the number you gave the iPod in iTunes. Additionally, having a variety of colours for cases can make it easier for students to spot their iPods.   Do set up an iTunes account for the classroom computer.  Most prefer to keep their personal iTunes account separate from their school account. Now, you do not need an iTunes account to download podcasts and iTunes U collections. You do need an account if you plan to download audiobooks and apps, even if you only download free apps. iTunes usually requires a credit card to be on file when you create an account unless you follow these directions . You can sync all of the iPods using that one account. Everything you download with that account will be locked to that account and can only be installed from computers that are authorized with the account's Apple ID and password.   Do know you can authorize more than one account on a computer.  If you bought software using a different account from your classroom account, it is possible to also authorize your account in addition to your school account ron the classroom syncing computer. Click  Authorize Computer  from iTunes' Store menu and enter your Apple ID and password. Realize that you can authorize an account on up to five computers. When you deauthorize your account on the computer the apps and audiobooks that are associated with your account will be deleted from the iPods.   Do use a flash drive to transfer apps between computers . When you purchase an app in iTunes it is downloaded and stored on your computer's hard drive. That same app file is then copied to all iPods that sync with your iTunes Library. There might be times you download apps on a computer other than the one you use for syncing. In this case you will need to copy the apps from the original computer's Library onto the new computer for syncing with iPods. The easiest way is to use a flash drive. On the first computer click Applications under Library. Then drag and drop the apps you wish to copy onto the flash drive. They appear as .ipa files with an iTunes icon. Eject and insert the flash drive into the computer used for syncing. Drag the apps from the flash drive into the iTunes Library. If the apps were downloaded or purchased under a different iTunes account than the one on the syncing computer, you may have to authorize your account (see above).   Do get a charging cart, case, or tray if you have the money . Bretford makes the PowerSync Cart  for iPod. It's pricey at about $2300. For about half the price they offer the PowerSync Case .  TriBeam  is another company that makes carts and trays for syncing iPods. Also, PARAT Solutions makes  Parasync , and they have created a  product comparison chart . An advantage to these solutions is that each iPod has its own slot. Numbering these slots allows the teacher to quickly see which iPods are missing. If you cannot afford a cart or case, do buy a couple of powered USB hubs so you can sync and charge several iPods at once. If you stagger connecting the iPods, you can sync and charge an entire class set without buying expensive equipment.   Do have procedures for passing out, turning in, and syncing . Will students get their iPod as they enter the classroom? Do you have a helper student who will pick up the iPods? How will you know when all iPods have been turned in? There are lots of ways teachers manage iPods in the classroom. The key is having procedures for everyone.   Do secure iPods when not in use.  Have a place to lock up the iPods.   Do have earbuds for each student . Something else that isn't fun is using earbuds that someone else has stuck in their ears. You can get inexpensive earbuds at Walmart and online . Most students probably already have their own earbuds.   Do create a web clip icon for your class or school website . A web clip is an icon you can add to your Home screen as a shortcut to a website. With one tap, Safari will open to the web clip's page. To make a web clip, simply open the page in Safari. Tap the Plus sign at the bottom of the screen. Tap Add to Home Screen and edit the title (if you want). Tap Add and, presto, a new icon is added to your Home Screen. This will need to be done on each iPod individually. Adding a web clip to your class website enables you to add a link to your site that students can easily access on their iPods without typing in a web address.   Do use a URL shortener .   Do have consequences for misuse . AUPs   Do create a usage contract . A contract is an effective way to communicate how and when an iPod can be used. Have students and parents sign the contract to indicate they agree to follow the rules and accept the consequences for breaking the rules. You may want to model your contract after some of these: Culbreth Middle School iNtouch Club Lenape iPod Touch 1:1 User Agreement Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Use Contract ELL iPod Agreement   Do set up email. . Like it or not, email is the primary way to get some information off the iPod and onto a computer. If students are assigned their own iPods, then it makes sense to set up each iPod with the student's email account. Some schools use Gaggle.net email, which can be configured to work on iPod touch. If students do not have their own email or students share individual iPods, you may want to set up each one with a  free Gmail account . The problem with setting up all those accounts is the time involved and the difficulty in monitoring so many accounts. An alternative is to  create  one Gmail account to be used on all iPods. So that you can tell which iPod an email originated from,  type in the number of the iPod or the name of the student in the Email settings Name field . This will need to be set up individually on each iPod. Additionally, be sure the teacher's email address is added to the address book so students can easily send what they create on the iPod touch to the teacher.   Don'ts Don't give students the iTunes account password .   Don't sync iPods with any other computer than the original .   Don't feel you need to sync iPods everyday . If you plan ahead, you can make it so syncing is required only weekly and perhaps monthly. Depending on use, however, iPods will probably need to be charged every couple days.   Don't use liquids to clean the screen .   Don't put up with a glitchy iPod . iPods can easily be restored to factory settings if something gets out of whack (or if a student decides to lock the iPod and forget the password).  Read about restoring .   Don't forget professional development . Bottom of Form Top of Form Bottom of Form  
  • http://learninginhand.com/do Classroom iPod touches & iPads: Dos and Don'ts iPod touch but the same advice goes for iPad and iPhone. The list is for large or small class sets of handhelds; if students are using their own personal iPods there’s a different set of considerations and technical issues to deal with.   Dos Do sync all iPods to one computer.   You can add media to one computer's iTunes Library and know that it will sync with all iPods. The one computer you sync with can be Windows or Macintosh. Some people report that Windows computers freeze when syncing more than a few iPods at once. Macs appear to work better at syncing multiple iPods.   Do name iPods . The first time you sync an iPod you are prompted to give it a name in iTunes. Start the name with a number so iPods are listed in order under the Devices list. Include a zero in front of number 1-9 so the computers sure to list them correctly. You can always change an iPod's name anytime using iTunes.   Do set each device's wallpaper with a number or name.  An innovative way to identify iPods touches is to set the wallpaper image of each device to include its number or a name. This way you can simply press the Home button and the screen instantly lights up and displays the device's number. Wallpaper can be any image that's in the Photos app. That includes images synced using iTunes or images saved from mobile Safari or other apps. I've made three sets of images that you're welcome to use as wallpaper.    Do set iPods for automatic sync of all content.  Configure each iPod to sync all audio, video, podcasts, and apps so that everything in the iTunes Library is automatically transferred. No buttons to push or click. Simply plugging in the iPod will ensure that everything in the iTunes Library is synced onto the iPod.  Each iPod will have to be configured separately in iTunes.   Do make playlists.  Because everything in the computer's iTunes Library will be synced onto the iPods, it's a good idea to organize what you want students to access into playlists. Do this by click the + in the bottom-left of the iTunes windows. Name your playlist and then drag and drop audio, video, podcasts, and audiobooks onto it. You can click and drag to reorder items within a playlist. Upon next sync, the playlist will appear.   Do delete content . Since you are mirroring the computer's iTunes Library onto the iPods, deleting items from iTunes will delete them from the iPods. After you no longer have a need for a podcast, video, or audiobook, delete it so it is not taking up room and cluttering up the iPods. Chances are you want to use this content with a future class. If it's something you will use again, drag and drop it into a folder on your desktop. You can drag and drop it back into iTunes for the next time you want it synced to iPods.   Do configure the Music app for easy access to playlists and podcasts . I wish the Music app on iPod touch was named Audio instead because that is where you listen to any audio and access podcasts. As its name suggests, the app is set up for listening to songs. With a few changes, you can make it easier for students access educational content on the iPod. First, launch the Music app and tap the  More  button. Then tap  Edit . Drag the Playlists, Podcasts,and iTunes U buttons to the bottom of the screen. If you use audiobooks you can drag that too. You'll need to do this on each iPod touch (or better yet have students do it). Now when the Music app is launched, students have quick one-tap access to whatever buttons you added to the bottom of the screen.   Do label or engrave iPods . It's important for teachers and students to be able to identify iPods. Giving iPods numbers is helpful. Engrave numbers on the iPods' backs. Unfortunately, this number cannot be seen when the iPod is in a protective case. Putting a sticker on the front or writing the number on the case is helpful. Be sure the number matches the number you gave the iPod in iTunes. Additionally, having a variety of colours for cases can make it easier for students to spot their iPods.   Do set up an iTunes account for the classroom computer.  Most prefer to keep their personal iTunes account separate from their school account. Now, you do not need an iTunes account to download podcasts and iTunes U collections. You do need an account if you plan to download audiobooks and apps, even if you only download free apps. iTunes usually requires a credit card to be on file when you create an account unless you follow these directions . You can sync all of the iPods using that one account. Everything you download with that account will be locked to that account and can only be installed from computers that are authorized with the account's Apple ID and password.   Do know you can authorize more than one account on a computer.  If you bought software using a different account from your classroom account, it is possible to also authorize your account in addition to your school account ron the classroom syncing computer. Click  Authorize Computer  from iTunes' Store menu and enter your Apple ID and password. Realize that you can authorize an account on up to five computers. When you deauthorize your account on the computer the apps and audiobooks that are associated with your account will be deleted from the iPods.   Do use a flash drive to transfer apps between computers . When you purchase an app in iTunes it is downloaded and stored on your computer's hard drive. That same app file is then copied to all iPods that sync with your iTunes Library. There might be times you download apps on a computer other than the one you use for syncing. In this case you will need to copy the apps from the original computer's Library onto the new computer for syncing with iPods. The easiest way is to use a flash drive. On the first computer click Applications under Library. Then drag and drop the apps you wish to copy onto the flash drive. They appear as .ipa files with an iTunes icon. Eject and insert the flash drive into the computer used for syncing. Drag the apps from the flash drive into the iTunes Library. If the apps were downloaded or purchased under a different iTunes account than the one on the syncing computer, you may have to authorize your account (see above).   Do get a charging cart, case, or tray if you have the money . Bretford makes the PowerSync Cart  for iPod. It's pricey at about $2300. For about half the price they offer the PowerSync Case .  TriBeam  is another company that makes carts and trays for syncing iPods. Also, PARAT Solutions makes  Parasync , and they have created a  product comparison chart . An advantage to these solutions is that each iPod has its own slot. Numbering these slots allows the teacher to quickly see which iPods are missing. If you cannot afford a cart or case, do buy a couple of powered USB hubs so you can sync and charge several iPods at once. If you stagger connecting the iPods, you can sync and charge an entire class set without buying expensive equipment.   Do have procedures for passing out, turning in, and syncing . Will students get their iPod as they enter the classroom? Do you have a helper student who will pick up the iPods? How will you know when all iPods have been turned in? There are lots of ways teachers manage iPods in the classroom. The key is having procedures for everyone.   Do secure iPods when not in use.  Have a place to lock up the iPods.   Do have earbuds for each student . Something else that isn't fun is using earbuds that someone else has stuck in their ears. You can get inexpensive earbuds at Walmart and online . Most students probably already have their own earbuds.   Do create a web clip icon for your class or school website . A web clip is an icon you can add to your Home screen as a shortcut to a website. With one tap, Safari will open to the web clip's page. To make a web clip, simply open the page in Safari. Tap the Plus sign at the bottom of the screen. Tap Add to Home Screen and edit the title (if you want). Tap Add and, presto, a new icon is added to your Home Screen. This will need to be done on each iPod individually. Adding a web clip to your class website enables you to add a link to your site that students can easily access on their iPods without typing in a web address.   Do use a URL shortener .   Do have consequences for misuse . AUPs   Do create a usage contract . A contract is an effective way to communicate how and when an iPod can be used. Have students and parents sign the contract to indicate they agree to follow the rules and accept the consequences for breaking the rules. You may want to model your contract after some of these: Culbreth Middle School iNtouch Club Lenape iPod Touch 1:1 User Agreement Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Use Contract ELL iPod Agreement   Do set up email. . Like it or not, email is the primary way to get some information off the iPod and onto a computer. If students are assigned their own iPods, then it makes sense to set up each iPod with the student's email account. Some schools use Gaggle.net email, which can be configured to work on iPod touch. If students do not have their own email or students share individual iPods, you may want to set up each one with a  free Gmail account . The problem with setting up all those accounts is the time involved and the difficulty in monitoring so many accounts. An alternative is to  create  one Gmail account to be used on all iPods. So that you can tell which iPod an email originated from,  type in the number of the iPod or the name of the student in the Email settings Name field . This will need to be set up individually on each iPod. Additionally, be sure the teacher's email address is added to the address book so students can easily send what they create on the iPod touch to the teacher.   Don'ts Don't give students the iTunes account password .   Don't sync iPods with any other computer than the original .   Don't feel you need to sync iPods everyday . If you plan ahead, you can make it so syncing is required only weekly and perhaps monthly. Depending on use, however, iPods will probably need to be charged every couple days.   Don't use liquids to clean the screen .   Don't put up with a glitchy iPod . iPods can easily be restored to factory settings if something gets out of whack (or if a student decides to lock the iPod and forget the password).  Read about restoring .   Don't forget professional development . Bottom of Form Top of Form Bottom of Form  
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  • portability - access to reminders and ‘how-to’ tutorials at the point of need. Care:high-spec smartphones can be too complex or ‘fiddly’ discreet ways of compensating for learning difficulties, thus maintaining motivation. Personal organisation – eg arriving in class on time, following directions and managing learning activities beyond f2f sessions –respond well to ‘cool’ piece of kit. Instructional videos anytime, anywhere: transformational: mastering independent living skills faster and with greater confidence. unforeseen benefits. Learners with communication difficulties become more willing to interact with their peers and even share their skills with tutors: willingness to engage in other forms of learning can ensue. Learners may initially find difficulty in using mobile devices, but experimentation makes it easier to master complex technologies. The opportunity to ‘play with’ a device also engenders a sense of fun which can motivate improve learners’ self-image and even develop skills valuable in the workplace. most important factor: appropriateness of the match between device, purpose or activity and learner profile. Assumptions about what will work for different kinds of learners can be ill-founded and decisions made on learners’ behalf without testing the devices in situ are unlikely to produce desirable outcomes. experiment
  • portability - access to reminders and ‘how-to’ tutorials at the point of need. Care:high-spec smartphones can be too complex or ‘fiddly’ discreet ways of compensating for learning difficulties, thus maintaining motivation. Personal organisation – eg arriving in class on time, following directions and managing learning activities beyond f2f sessions –respond well to ‘cool’ piece of kit. Instructional videos anytime, anywhere: transformational: mastering independent living skills faster and with greater confidence. unforeseen benefits. Learners with communication difficulties become more willing to interact with their peers and even share their skills with tutors: willingness to engage in other forms of learning can ensue. Learners may initially find difficulty in using mobile devices, but experimentation makes it easier to master complex technologies. The opportunity to ‘play with’ a device also engenders a sense of fun which can motivate improve learners’ self-image and even develop skills valuable in the workplace. most important factor: appropriateness of the match between device, purpose or activity and learner profile. Assumptions about what will work for different kinds of learners can be ill-founded and decisions made on learners’ behalf without testing the devices in situ are unlikely to produce desirable outcomes. experiment
  • Accessibility and mobile and wireless technologies both benefits and constraints. As the range of possible disabilities is wide, it is important to gauge the accessibility of any activity using mobile devices in the light of individual needs. Benefits: advantages to learners with disabilities: Participation in activities that might otherwise be inaccessible. Portable access to appropriately designed e-learning resources. Avoidance of some of the self-image problems associated with assistive technologies. Opportunities for self-paced use of learning resources in any context. assist with time management, calendar, clock, to-do list, alarm and notepad functions. Mind-mapping software, handwriting recognition, word prediction and spellchecking, portable keypads and onscreen keyboards Voice recording and camera facilities. Dyslexic learners: multimedia options eg audio clips, animations, video clips or text-to-speech. SMS messaging and email can help deaf learners work on collaborative tasks on an almost equal footing with their non-signing peers. Bluetoothing for collaborative tasks. Constraints VI and motor coordination : Small screen devices and the limited options for altering text sizes, colours and backgrounds. Cognitive difficulties or visual impairment, may also find the non-intuitive interfaces of many mobile devices difficult to use. TechDis recommendations on accessibility and mobile and wireless technologies: Explore the benefits of mobile and wireless learning - the wider the repertoire of skills a practitioner can develop, the more adaptable (and potentially accessible) their practice will be. When choosing any hardware or software, make accessibility one of the key purchasing criteria. Make sure your choice works for as many learners as possible. Consider accessibility whenever designing a learning activity and discuss any doubts about individuals' ability to access the activity in advance. This gives you the opportunity to adapt the approach or provide those learners with a different pathway to the same learning experience. Encourage learners to feedback on the accessibility of learning activities. It is not possible to add equal value all the time, so be prepared to add value differently to different groups at different times. There is never a 'one size fits all' solution.
  • Accessibility and mobile and wireless technologies both benefits and constraints. As the range of possible disabilities is wide, it is important to gauge the accessibility of any activity using mobile devices in the light of individual needs. Benefits: advantages to learners with disabilities: Participation in activities that might otherwise be inaccessible. Portable access to appropriately designed e-learning resources. Avoidance of some of the self-image problems associated with assistive technologies. Opportunities for self-paced use of learning resources in any context. assist with time management, calendar, clock, to-do list, alarm and notepad functions. Mind-mapping software, handwriting recognition, word prediction and spellchecking, portable keypads and onscreen keyboards Voice recording and camera facilities. Dyslexic learners: multimedia options eg audio clips, animations, video clips or text-to-speech. SMS messaging and email can help deaf learners work on collaborative tasks on an almost equal footing with their non-signing peers. Bluetoothing for collaborative tasks. Constraints VI and motor coordination : Small screen devices and the limited options for altering text sizes, colours and backgrounds. Cognitive difficulties or visual impairment, may also find the non-intuitive interfaces of many mobile devices difficult to use. TechDis recommendations on accessibility and mobile and wireless technologies: Explore the benefits of mobile and wireless learning - the wider the repertoire of skills a practitioner can develop, the more adaptable (and potentially accessible) their practice will be. When choosing any hardware or software, make accessibility one of the key purchasing criteria. Make sure your choice works for as many learners as possible. Consider accessibility whenever designing a learning activity and discuss any doubts about individuals' ability to access the activity in advance. This gives you the opportunity to adapt the approach or provide those learners with a different pathway to the same learning experience. Encourage learners to feedback on the accessibility of learning activities. It is not possible to add equal value all the time, so be prepared to add value differently to different groups at different times. There is never a 'one size fits all' solution.
  • .
  • . Practitioner planning doc http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearninginnovation/practitioner_plan.doc   http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearninginnovation/institution_audit.doc   http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearninginnovation/elearn_manager_plan.doc     Moulton http://www.moleshare.org.uk/case_studies.asp?ID=84&resi=QR+Code+Case+Study+-+Moulton+College   Charnwood http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/Programmes/page.aspx?o=164016   Castle College case study using Qwizdom http://www.moleshare.org.uk/case_studies.asp?ID=79&resi=Case+Study     Modification S Nottm College: usb camcorders for assessment significant task redesign due to the affordances available. eg   mobile devices on field trips (Strathmore College),   involving students with learning disabilities in safe sporting activities (Trafford College) Wii Fit for students with learning difficulties and/or disabilities http://www.moleshare.org.uk/case_studies.asp?ID=43&resi=Wii+Fit+for+LLDD   and using Flip video cameras for new forms of assessment (Dearne Valley College).     Redefinition redesigning curricula around mobile devices (South Nottingham College) may be two examples that qualify as ‘redefinition’. In future, removal of barriers regarding assessment and the separation of it from learning and teaching are likely to lead to new developments in this area. • York College - www.excellencegateway.org.uk/Programmes/page.aspx?o=169986 • South Nottingham College – www.excellencegateway.org.uk/Programmes/page.aspx?o=165762     RSCWM WBL using mobiles http://wiki.rscwmsystems.org.uk/images/c/c2/LJMM.pdf   current tablets project http://wiki.rscwmsystems.org.uk/index.php/2011-Tablet_Devices_Project
  • . Practitioner planning doc http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearninginnovation/practitioner_plan.doc   http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearninginnovation/institution_audit.doc   http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearninginnovation/elearn_manager_plan.doc     Will Wade (Acer Centre) Bett 2011-09-05 Apps for iPad and iPhone http://appsforaac.net/content/ipad-ipod-and-iphone-what-can-i-say-presentation-bett-2011   The iPod/iPhone The Appstore How do you operate iOS Unlike Windows, Linux or Mac operating systems the iOS is not, and cannot be controlled with a mouse or other similar input device easily (The keyword here is "easily". You can now operate the device with a keyboard and with this comes the ability to use switches and now a wheelchair joystick but its in a completely different manner and with limitations as you will see later on). Instead the device is one of the first devices that has been developed for dedicated touch only. The main difference to the user being a mouse cursor: there is none. Although windows tablets have existed for a long time now, windows touch devices still suffer from the basic tenet that you are moving a mouse around with your finger. Android is the next large mainstream platform that has been developed for touch but note at present there are only a very very small handful of AAC apps on the marketplace (4 at last count). You may be used to touchscreens but one of the important aspects to make this device so successful was a decision to use capactive touch rather than resistive. That means it picks up the electrical conductivity in your finger (or other body part) rather than what you may be more used to - the pressure from an object. The technology is generally more expensive but is thought to be more responsive. Touch may seem limiting at first but note that the devices can recognise multi-touch (i.e. multiple fingers on a screen) and as such developers can listen for "gestures" or finger movements on the screen to operate their software. For example pinching on a map allows you to zoom in, spreading two fingers - zoom out. With this complexity, its often first assumed that individual's with physical difficulties can often not use the device easily. However most AAC apps are designed to work with a single tap or tap and hold rather than the more complex gestures. Also note one other main factor; Apple have created highly desirable devices. We have found that many individuals will WANT to work the device above its limitations. Of course some will need assistance and control of fine motor movements but many are are able to adapt to the devices limitations in order to use this "cool" bit of technology. The iPod touch The iPhone Insurance & Warranties Cases & Speakers Buying Software The iPad The iPad Appstore confusion Mounting options AAC Software Alternative Access Useful accessibility options for all Restricting wandering fingers! 3rd party alternative access Problems Wish list Information Resources   RSCWM WBL using mobiles http://wiki.rscwmsystems.org.uk/images/c/c2/LJMM.pdf   current tablets project http://wiki.rscwmsystems.org.uk/index.php/2011-Tablet_Devices_Project
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    • 1. mobile technology for inclusivity 6 Dec 2011 www.rsc-em.ac.uk Martin Cooke ILT Advisor RSC EM
    • 2.
      • to gain an awareness of the variety of mobile technologies
      • to have an opportunity
        • to explore the accessibility features of some tools and platforms
        • to address some of the issues surrounding mobile technologies and personalisation
      Objectives
    • 3. 10.05 Textwall: How mobile learning can help with inclusion 10.30 Alex Hayes:  Lessons from Molenet 11.00 Activity: evaluating the tools 12.00 Ideas for inclusive activities 12.30   LUNCH 1.15 Stuart Jones : iPads for inclusion 2.00 platforms and apps 2.30 Textwall: issues 3.00 Resources, inc efair usb 3.30 end Programme
    • 4.  
    • 5.  
    • 6. Aakash World’s cheapest tablet £23
    • 7.  
    • 8.  
    • 9. http://www.alt.ac.uk/Ofsted_CIF_Consultation ALT's response to Ofsted Common Inspection Framework, Nov 2011 We think that the absence of any mention of technology supported learning in relation to the quality of teaching, learning and assessment is a major omission that must be remedied, and we were very pleased to hear that this problem has been recognised by Ofsted with a view to it being addressed. ...CIF must take explicit account of the fundamental and seismic changes that are currently taking place in the way that knowledge is created, acquired and distributed.
    • 10. What has changed? Something has happened… In the UK 41% of the population own a smartphone: 50% in 2012 ? pervasive and ubiquitous conspicuous and unobtrusive noteworthy and taken-for-granted John Traxler
    • 11. I haven’t got a smartphone
    • 12. Khan Academy http://www.khanacademy.org/ Chris Anderson How web video powers global innovation http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/chris_anderson_how_web_video_powers_global_innovation.html Resources: video
    • 13.
      • Mobile Learning Infokit
      • https://mobilelearninginfokit.pbworks.com
      • Go Mobile
      • http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/assets/Documents/goingdigital/Go_Mobile.pdf
      • Upwardly Mobile
      • http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/UpwardlyMobile/
      • College of NW London Mlearning Project
      • http://www.cnwl.ac.uk/mobilelearn/CNWL_WLLLN_MobileLearning_ProjectReport%20(2).pdf
      Resources: mlearning
    • 14.  
    • 15. Thanet Learner Entitlement list : a marketing tool Avoids outdated technologies   1. Remote access 2. Remote submission 3. 24/7 learning 4. own hardware and social media 5. access to resources 6. Personalisation 7. access to OL learning space Mobile learning
    • 16.
      • Informal
      • Just-in-time
      • 24x7
      • Active learning
      • Personalisation
      • Reasonable adjustments
      • Motivation
      • Cool
      • Spontaneity
      • Makes for less dependence on IT support
      Mobile learning
    • 17.
      • Smartphones
      • Tablets
      • Ereaders
      • Video and audio recorders
      Mobile devices
    • 18.
      • Doug Belshaw :
      • How to teach using Mobile phones
      • http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2011/may/10/mobile-phones-teaching-device
      • ebooks
      • SMS polling
      • Speech recognition
      • Drawing apps – for building e-portfolio
      • Google maps and GPS, Google earth
      • Evernote
      • Wifi or blutooth work to computer
      • Powerpoints as jpgs or pdfs – access on mobiles
      • Record audio ideas, comments, feedback
      Mobile devices
    • 19. Maximising independence Alternatives to text Learner voice Focus on strengths Personalisation Inclusive learning
    • 20. http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/techdis/pages/detail/floating_pages/A_Model_of_Accessible_m-learning model of m-learning
    • 21. Record lesson and upload it as podcast. Share link Share your number - learners message Qs while reviewing lesson Ask a Q - use phones to find the answer Create short lists of points, eg dates, hints, short summaries, etc share via messaging 5 mins study using Google maps before quiz Daily vocabulary: send flashcards with a new word and definition Ideas for activities
    • 22. * iPads for inclusion iPads for inclusion iPad comes with in-built voice over www.lexdis.org.uk/technology/115 RNIB backs the iPad http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/apple/7801280/Apple-iPad-is-great-gadget-for-blind-people.html How can a clear flat screen be accessible to VI learners? Accessibility of iPads http://rscemaccessibility.blogspot.com/2011/04/ipad-apps-for-accessibility.html Collaboration – pass it round *NB other tablets are available
    • 23. iPad Gestures Touch to highlight Double tap to open Reading text Touch to select area of text 2 fingers flick down : read 3 finger double tap: mute or unmute VoiceOver
    • 24. multiple iPads
      • http://learninginhand.com/do
      • sync all iPods to one computer 
      • name iPods
      • set each device's wallpaper with a number or name 
      • set iPods for automatic sync of all content 
      • make playlists 
      • delete content
      • configure the Music app for easy access to podcasts
    • 25. multiple iPads
      • http://learninginhand.com/do
      • Don't give students the iTunes account password
      • Don't sync iPods with any other computer than the original
    • 26. apps: RSCSE advent calendar http://moodle-rsc.ukc.ac.uk/mod/resource/view.php?id=5823 RSC South-East advent calendar Have you seen the RSC south-east advent calendar? Useful apps and tips for each day of December. No you can’t look at tomorrow’s until you wake up in the morning! Now go to sleep and stop asking questions.
    • 27. Livescribe pen
    • 28. Livescribe pen
      • Portability - the device is always with them. No need for computer interface
      • Audio can be used to support learners with
      • poor memory skills
      • poor notetaking skills
      • motor difficulties
      • learning difficulties
      • Also useful for A-level students who want to capture a lesson
    • 29. Numeracy and data opportunity to drill and practice in the privacy of a mobile device eg Nintendo lack of confidence with numeracy can undermine progress in practical work such as fieldwork, lab work, practicals and placements. Well-designed spreadsheet activities running on a mobile device can bridge the gap between anxiety and confidence: especially beneficial for learners with dyscalculia number-crunching complicates data collection and analysis: either the maths takes up time and overshadows the underlying concepts, or the analysis takes place long after the practical ends when the learners have forgotten. By supporting analysis on mobile devices, the maths can take place instantly, allowing the learners to focus on hypotheses and predictions.
    • 30. images and video
      •   benefits of learners using digital cameras and video on mobile devices include:
      • Portability
      • Help for learners with
      • poor memory skills.
      • poor note taking skills
      • poor written skills
      • learning difficulties
      • Opportunities to capture the learner's own practical skills
    • 31. SMS  
      • Many LPS use texting to send admin and other planning info. Also increasingly used for marketing
      • Use in lessons:
      • More open than audience response systems (clickers) ie ABCor D
      • summarise a given passage and text it to the text wall. Review answers
      • case study : text in opinions or solutions: discussion generated
      • summarise lesson: start following lesson by reviewing points
    • 32. SMS
    • 33. Issues
    • 34. Issues
      • Some learners need simple tools – eg digital keyring
      • Small is not good for many learners
      • What is accessible to one may be inaccessible to another
      • Best assessment is made by the learner themselves
      • key barriers for learners with disabilities may include:
      • small screen size
      • small keys
      • complex navigation structures
      • font types, sizes and colours can be very limited
      • BUT don’t underestimate the creativity of disabled learners in accessing new experiences. Many VI learners are still wedded to their mobile phones . 
    • 35. Issues: usability Myth: Students with disabilities cannot use mobile devices for learning Apple deviceshave some of the most consistent, rigorous accessibility features if an app does not meet core accessibility guidelines, it is not approved for entry into the iOS store Although this is less true of other app stores, the ability for learners to personalise their device, to have it  constantly  set up for their use, removes a barrier to learning. https://mobilelearninginfokit.pbworks.com/w/page/43574938/Mobile%20learning%20myths
    • 36. Issues: esafety we are restricting social networking to known times/ places/ purposes - but obviously students can easily circumvent this with mobile devices. we dont want to impede learning or social interaction at appropriate times but we DO want to provide appropriate strategies and support to help them acquire skills for safe and effective e-usage to keep themselves safe not only now and in college but in the future and think before they use!
    • 37.
      • Mobile Learning Infokit
      • https://mobilelearninginfokit.pbworks.com
      • Go Mobile
      • http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/assets/Documents/goingdigital/Go_Mobile.pdf
      • Upwardly Mobile
      • http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/UpwardlyMobile/
      • 50 mlearning resources
      • http://www.slideshare.net/UpsideLearning/top-50mlearningmobilelearningresources
      Resources
    • 38.
      • Emerging Practice in Mobile Learning 20/10/2011
      • Recent RSC national online event
      • https://sites.google.com/a/jiscadvance.ac.uk/events/event-1
      Resources
    • 39. Resources: Case studies Chesterfield College http://www.moleshare.org.uk/case_studies.asp?ID=83&ms=1 Oakwood Court http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/Programmes/page.aspx?o=286422 RNIB College http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/Programmes/page.aspx?o=262117 Kindle http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=319414 Portland College http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=309126&c=casestudies
    • 40. Resources: Case studies   Moulton: using QR codes http://www.moleshare.org.uk/case_studies.asp?ID=84&resi=QR+Code+Case+Study+-+Moulton+College Charnwood: using tablets http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/Programmes/page.aspx?o=164016 Castle College: using Qwizdom http://www.moleshare.org.uk/case_studies.asp?ID=79&resi=Case+Study Modification: significant task redesign due to the affordances available. eg involving students with learning disabilities in safe sporting activities (Trafford College) Wii Fit for students with learning difficulties and/or disabilities http://www.moleshare.org.uk/case_studies.asp?ID=43&resi=Wii+Fit+for+LLDD   and using Flip video cameras for new forms of assessment (Dearne Valley College) Redefinition : redesigning curricula around mobile devices • York College - www.excellencegateway.org.uk/Programmes/page.aspx?o=169986 • South Nottingham College – www.excellencegateway.org.uk/Programmes/page.aspx?o=165762 South Staffs College: researching independently http://goo.gl/jcPTM
    • 41. Resources: MoleTV   TEXT TO SPEECH app Neo Kate on IPOD TOUCH http://www.moleshare.org.uk/results.asp?ID=1467&ResID=0&X=TV&k=Neo+Kate&z=1   HTC in Literacy http://www.moletv.org.uk/watch.aspx?v=ZW61Q   HTC in Numeracy http://www.moletv.org.uk/watch.aspx?v=UD2OA   PSPs http://www.moletv.org.uk/watch.aspx?v=KUGNO   iPad http://www.moletv.org.uk/watch.aspx?v=KQIB5
    • 42. Resources: links      RSCWM WBL using mobiles http://wiki.rscwmsystems.org.uk/images/c/c2/LJMM.pdf   current tablets project http://wiki.rscwmsystems.org.uk/index.php/2011-Tablet_Devices_Project Practitioner planning doc http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearninginnovation/practitioner_plan.doc   http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearninginnovation/institution_audit.doc   http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearninginnovation/elearn_manager_plan.doc Will Wade (Acer Centre) Bett 2011 Apps for iPad and iPhone http://appsforaac.net/content/ipad-ipod-and-iphone-what-can-i-say-presentation-bett-2011    
    • 43. Resources: links How to teach using Mobile phones http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2011/may/10/mobile-phones-teaching-device How to teach using mobile devices Doug Belshaw http://dougbelshaw.com/blog/2011/05/10/how-to-teach-using-mobile-devices/ HP Touchpad http://dpmassey.wordpress.com/2011/06/18/using-tablet-devices-in-learning-teaching-and-education/ Mobile web apps Mark Power http://blogs.cetis.ac.uk/mark/2011/03/02/mobile-web-apps-a-briefing-paper/ An alternative to android and apple? HTML5 Making Mobile learning Work John Traxler http://escalate.ac.uk/8250 i-Pads project project managed intro of tablets http://asp-uk.secure-zone.net/v2/index.jsp?id=639/684/1625&lng=en Classroom ideas for using iPad apps http://asp-uk.secure-zone.net/v2/index.jsp?id=639/684/1619&lng=en
    • 44. email: martin.cooke@rsc-em.ac.uk RSC Moodle http://moodle.rsc-em.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=80