European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructure May 2011

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  • 1. European Network for co-ordination of policies andprogrammes on e-infrastructures Malcolm READ-JISC M.Read@jisc.ac.uk
  • 2. ERA-NET Scheme in FP7 - Type of Actions ERA-NET Coordination of programmes  MS agree and fund joint calls/programmes  EU funding only for coordination ERA-NET Top up of a single joint call Plus  MS contribute to a joint trans-national call 2/3  EU funding for research: 1/3 of the j oint call 2e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 3. Project Objectives  Identify existing programmes  Analyse the programmes and policies  Provide a platform for debating  Exchange strategic views  Prepare and implement joint policy activities  Joint policy programmes and calls 3e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 4. Benefits  Closer coordinated national policies  European policies in line with the needs of member states  More competitive presence and closer collaboration on an international level  Development of common protocols that will allow interoperability of e-Infrastructures throughout Europe  The national support programmes will learn from each other about best practices etc. 4e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 5. Current Partners  The project consists of key representatives from ministries and funding agencies in nine European countries 5e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 6. Current Partners Organisation Country Higher Education Authority Ireland Joint Information Systems Committee United Kingdom SURFfoundation Netherlands Foundation for Science and Technology Portugal Latvian Academy of Sciences Latvia Ministry of Science and Innovation Spain IT Centre for Science Finland National Information Infrastructure Hungary The Scientific and Technological Research Council Turkey of Turkey 6e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 7. Focus Areas  Cloud Computing  dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources  Environmental & Green Computing  Environmentally sustainable computing or ICT  ICT worldwide is responsible for 2% of global CO2 production!  Openness  Open Access, Open Source, Open Borders and Open Opportunity  Research Data Access 7e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 8. Work-programme  The WP1 to WP3 process is repeated for the 3 focus areas:  information exchange  joint activities definition  implementation  WP4 aims to implement programmes/calls between more than one countries  In WP5 we address wider communication and networking activities 8e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 9. Overview WP1 - Information Exchange Openness Cloud Computing leader: SURFoundation Green Computing WP2 - Joint Activities Definition and Preparation leader: CSC WP5 WP6 Dissemination Management WP3 - Implementation of Joint Activities leader: leader: HEA leader: HEFCE TUBITAK WP4 - Funding of joint programmes and Sustainability of the e-InfraNet leader: MICINN 9e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 10. New Partner Accession  e-InfraNet consortia aims to be as inclusive and representative as possible  A fund of 20% of the total budget is being retained for future allocation to new partners  e-InfraNet coordinator is conducting a campaign to attract new partners (initial focus on other members of ENPG and e-IRG)  Isreal (Israeli Industry Centre for R&D) and Belgium ( Department of Economy Science and Innovation) have confirmed their intention to join  Negotiation ongoing with France, Greece and Italy. 10e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 11. Green ICT  e-InfraNet is seeking to develop an environmental imperative and other Green policies.  The e-InfraNet survey on Green ICT national programmes in Europe showed that Green ICT is emerging as a topic of concern in some countries but that few coordinated programmes exist at the European level.  There was consensus among partners that this area could benefit substantially from a cooperative approach 11e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 12. Workshop on Green ICT and Environmental Computing  The reflections on Green ICT were originally limited to reducing the environmental impact of ICT products and services- the ‘ICT carbon footprint’.  However it is now recognized that ICT can also have a major impact through enabling efficiencies in other sectors.  e-InfraNet organised a workshop in Helsinki ( 27th and 28th of October ) to address both dimensions of this challenge and presented some of the most original projects and initiatives in the field from the development of greener e-Infrastructures, data centers, telecom and computer devices.  It also reviewed the EU and member state’s green strategies and policies with keynotes from EC and e- InfraNet partner’s government representatives. 12e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 13. Conclusions of the Workshop The following over arching conclusions were drawn from the workshop:  Widely recognized that there is an urgent need for a common framework to quantify energy efficiency and therefore measure and evaluate gains  Cloud Computing offers real opportunities in the Green area –but this is an area where more work and research is needed  As processing and storage demands expand, data centres demands on energy consumption increases. This is an area that needs particular focus  There is a disconnection between the providers and the users of energy. A JISC report showed that only 50% of IT directors have knowledge of the IT energy bill and even fewer actually pay it. 13e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 14. Towards a pan-European Green ICT Education and Research Network  The lack of Green ICT skills was identified as a bottleneck when trying to change behaviors and promote Green actions.  The skills do exist but are not recognised as such and valued in society.  Green ICT awareness and skills development could be better addressed in education curricula.  Building on the conclusions of the workshop and having regard to the results of the e-InfraNet survey on green ICT: The establishment of a pan-European Green ICT network linking together universities, research and training centres to exchange knowledge, experience and skills in the field of Green ICT, was seen as a viable option to address this issue. 14e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 15. Actions required to launch the Green ICT Network Three main actions have been planned to launch the network:  Action 1: Organization of a "brainstorming” event involving the main actors who will constitute the network – 26-27 of May, Bristol, UK  Action 2: Establishment of a forum for exchanging information on research and policy activities in Green ICT – from Sept 2011  Action 3: Organisation of a 1st International Summer School on Green ICT – Timeline: May- June 2012 15e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011
  • 16. Which bit of the Cloud?Every level of the ‘stack’ is catered for – which is right for you? Software as a Service (SaaS) Diagram credit: www.saasblogs.com – eg, Google Apps, Microsoft 365 Platform as a Service (PaaS) – eg, MS Azure, Google App Engine Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) – ie, compute, storage, database – eg, Amazon Web Services, Vmware vCloud, Eucalyptus Do we need to add in Middleware as a Service (MaaS) – Offerings like Cassandra or Amazon Elastic Map Reduce
  • 17. Current PictureUsage Mostly SaaS to date: e-Mail, followed by storage, web services and virtual learning environments. Some use of other levels of stackReason for uptake Provision of a better service, followed by a reduction in costs, better collaboration and a reduction of hardware overheads as part of a green IT strategyBarriers to uptake Jurisdiction issues, uptime of services, security of services, lock- in and the strength of service level agreements Real costs of research computing currently hidden from most users so Cloud can look expensive
  • 18. Why Invest in Cloud Computing? Efficient, cost effective infrastructure – provides access to industrial scale economies in deployment and use of infrastructure and applications – leads to financial benefits and in turn carbon and other environmental benefits Potential to cope with sudden peak demands for increased storage and compute requirements Provides a suitable ‘neutral platform’ for HEI / business collaboration. Lowers barriers to participation in high end computing – “e- Science for the Masses”
  • 19. Financial CostLarge data centres can use economies of scale to besignificantly cheaper and can be flexible in delivering layersof a standardised, modularised serviceParticularly attractive to smaller institutions without the capitalbudget for wholesale rip and replace that are able to secureaccess to upgraded infrastructure which they could not otherwiseaffordNB Requires changes in culture – specifically expectations of‘fine-tuning’ of services to meet specific requirementsFor example, the European Space Agency is utilizing AmazonEC2 for the data-processing needs of its Gaia mission. The 40Gbper night that Gaia will generate would have cost $1.5 millionusing local resources but research suggests it could cost in the$500,000 range using EC2
  • 20. CollaborationUsing Cloud can make it easier to collaborate withbusinessesFor instance, if a spin-off company should come out of a projectthat uses web resources it may be easier to hand over control tosomething run on a virtual machineSimilarly, for partnerships with industry using an external cloudprovider can make it easier to collaborate as both HEIs andindustry often restrict external access to their systemsServices like e-Science Central1, a ‘Science-as-a-Service’platform that combines Software-as-a-Service, social networking,and “cloud” computing remove the need to maintain one’s ownsystems whilst still offering control over what, when and withwhom to share data1 www.esciencecentral.co.uk
  • 21. What should we look to use the Cloud for? Good candidate scenarios for Cloud deployment that JISC has identified include those with one or more of the following characteristics: – Short timescale requirements – Infrequent use and/or no desire to maintain infrastructure – Dynamic scalability to larger capacity (‘cloudbursting’) – Transfer to commercial use – Flexibility with system configuration and/or frozen system configuration – Data hosting and backup – Cloud-based research publications – Ad hoc activities in support of research
  • 22. Why build a private Cloud?The key word here is trust. Researchers and HE staff need tobe able to trust the reliability and integrity of the cloud theyuse as well as sustainability of data and overall reliabilityThere are four critical enabling factors of Cloud Computing: – virtualisation and automation – pay per user software – data centres – broadband connectivityTheres no reason though why the research and HE Cloud cantbe built from commercial componentsHowever the Cloud itself and the HEI’s connections to it must beas safe and reliable as the physical IT hardware it is replacingotherwise the benefits are meaningless
  • 23. Relevant UK studies Using Cloud Computing for Research1 study Report from workshop on Cloud Computing2 Currently 11 pilot projects funded by JISC and EPSRC31 www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/researchinfrastructure/usingcloudcomp.aspx2 www.rcuk.ac.uk/documents/research/esci/CloudWorkshopJuly2010.pdf3 cloudresearch.jiscinvolve.org
  • 24. e-InfraNet Events  Scoping Dimension Workshop, 15-16 April 2010– Leuven  Green and Environmental Computing, 27-28 October 2010, Helsinki, Finland  Cloud Computing Workshop 29-30 March 2011 Leuven, Belgium Planned:  Green ICT Brainstorming workshop to be held in Bristol, UK on 26-27 May 2011  Open Workshop to be held in The Netherlands 27-28 October 2011 24e-InfraNet: European network for co-ordination of policies and programmes on e-infrastructures 3 May 2011