Jill taylor roe

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Jill taylor roe

  1. 1. Trying to keep the customer satisfied – how PDA can help Jill Taylor-Roe, Head of Planning & Resources and Deputy Librarian. Newcastle University Library JIBS Ebooks Seminar, 26 Nov, 2013 University Library
  2. 2. Topics to be covered      Why we care about customer satisfaction How we measure it How we use what we learn How PDA may help Where we go from here… University Library
  3. 3. Why we care about Satisfaction (1)  We are an Academic Service which exists to:  “support the University’s learning and teaching, research, innovation and engagement by providing resources and professional expertise to enable the effective discovery and use of information and the development and communication of knowledge”  (Taken from Newcastle University Library Strategic Planning Statement) University Library
  4. 4. Why we care about Satisfaction (2)  Because we are a SERVICE industry, so we should care!  Easier to argue for more resources if you can demonstrate you are delivering service/added value University Library
  5. 5. How we measure satisfaction with our resources and services (1)         External validation: e.g. Chartermark – 1st UK Uni Library to win one, 5 in total Customer Service Excellence Times Higher Award 2011 – Outstanding Library Team National Student Satisfaction Survey (NSS)– joint 5th in 2013 International Student Barometer (ISB) – 1st in Russell Group for physical library, 7th for online library Postgraduate research survey ( PRES) Postgraduate taught Survey, (PTES)  University Library
  6. 6. University Library
  7. 7. How we measure satisfaction with our resources and services (2) – tell us what you think University Library
  8. 8. How we measure satisfaction with our resources and services (3) – KPIs Value for money KPI1 KPI2 KPI3 Target Current position (2011-12) Expenditure on information as % of total library expenditure Expenditure on staff as % of total library expenditure 50% 49.13% 42% 40.23% 90% 90.02% 90% 90% 90% 90% 94.3% 92.1% Efficiency Self-service loans as % of total loan transactions KPI4 Effectiveness NSS score Question 16 KPI5 ISB score: Physical library Online library University Library
  9. 9. University Library
  10. 10. A cautionary note…  Positive feedback is much appreciated, and is just reward for staff who work so hard to deliver good service ….  However…  Always scope for improvement,  Cannot please everyone  *Never* be complacent  Always look for further improvement University Library
  11. 11. How we use what we learn  Feedback from users regarding lack of library space and lack of IT informed major 2 yr refurb plan  Feedback from users regarding lack of journals informs future acquisitions  Feedback on lack of bookstock has always been harder to address because it is seldom specific enough … University Library
  12. 12. Typical comments from the National Student Satisfaction Survey ( NSS) “The Library does not have enough books” “Insufficient main texts in the library...” “Books for our course are expensive and there aren’t enough copies in the library for everyone” “There are never enough books for our course” “not enough books for my essay” “we need more core texts” University Library
  13. 13. How did we usually respond to this feedback?        Worked hard to secure more student input re book selection Engage with staff student committees Tell us which books we lack! Reduced “just in case” provision Increased multiple copy provision of core texts Reviewed loan categories All of which help – but we still receive complaints.... University Library
  14. 14. Is PDA the answer? University Library
  15. 15. Why were patron-led ebooks so attractive to add to the mix?  Little evidence that simply acquiring more print books made any real difference to student perceptions  Increasing pressure on library space  concept of only paying for what you use very attractive  2009/10 PVC Teaching and Learning wanted an “innovative project” to support student needs University Library
  16. 16. Early days       £7Ok start up fund 100,000 + ebook catalogue records loaded Minimal profiling Soft launch, Feb 2010 3 loans per person per day 1 or 7 day loan University Library
  17. 17. Result? – almost too successful... Weekly Usage Trend Feb-July 2010 1090 1000 800 Requests Users loved it £37K spent in March alone! Numerous tweaks made to limit demand e.g. reduce loans per day, introduce mediation 1200 autopurchas es STL (Loans) 600 400 200 63 65 0 wk2 wk4 wk6 wk8 wk10 wk12 wk14 wk16 wk18 wk20 wk22 wk24 University Library
  18. 18. So how did we make it sustainable?  Better profiling of the collection  Removal of 505 field from EBL bib records so that all our ebook collections are equally exposed to view  Revealed costs to users- even though library pays  Turned off downloading for non-owned items University Library
  19. 19. Where are we now? Yr 4 of established service 30000 monthly spend on EBL loans 25000 20000 2009/10 2010/11 15000 2011/12 2012/13 10000 2013/14 5000 0 aug sep oct nov dec jan feb mar apr may jun jul University Library
  20. 20. Where are we now? Yr 4 of established service monthly spend on EBL autopurchases 10000 9000 8000 7000 6000 2009/10 2010/11 5000 2011/12 4000 2012/13 2013/14 3000 2000 1000 0 aug sep oct nov dec jan feb mar apr may jun jul University Library
  21. 21. More sustainable expenditure pattern monthly spend on EBL loans and autopurchases 40000 35000 2009/10 30000 2010/11 25000 2011/12 2012/13 20000 2013/14 15000 10000 5000 0 aug sep oct nov dec jan feb mar apr may jun jul University Library
  22. 22. Heaviest users of patron-led ebooks SELL SAPL Psychology NUBS SML Med Scis Mech Eng Maths MAST Library Law Hist Studies GPS EECE ECLS Dentistry Comp Sci Chemistry CEG CEAM Biomedical Sciences Biology Arts & Cultures AFRD Series1 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 University Library
  23. 23. Carving up the Acquisitions Budget Proportion of ebk fund devoted to patron-led 2012/13 (c 40%) ebookspend patron led ebk spend University Library
  24. 24. Extending patron led to the Print bookfund     Initial Pilot 2011/12 Allocated prev yr’s overdue income ( circa £60K) 2 strands – high demand items ( reading list material) Books required for by individual students ( dissertation topics)  Minimum referral – only very expensive books referred to liaison librarians  2013/13 – circa £37K spent – around 1000 titles purchased University Library
  25. 25. 350 Heaviest users of print patron-led over the last 3 yrs 300 250 200 150 Series1 100 50 0 NUBS GPS HIST SACS SAPL ECLS SELL SML University Library
  26. 26. Dividing up the print book fund Proportion of print bookfund devoted to patron-led 2012/13 ( c 10%) print bkspend patron led print spend University Library
  27. 27. What have we learnt along the way? (1)  Top Ten Schools who use the patron led service are:            Business School Geography, Politics & Sociology Arts & Cultures Agriculture, Food and Rural Development Historical Studies Education, Communication and Language Sciences Business School English Literature, Language & Linguistic Studies Modern Languages Law Medical Sciences  NSS library scores for 6 of these schools went up in 2012  Most have remained high or improved in 2013 University Library
  28. 28. NSS scores for 2 of our heaviest users Newcastle Business School (NUBS) NSS scores 2010 Economics Bus Studies Marketing Management Accounting 2011 2012 2013 94 95 81 78 88 96 74 85 69 84 94 88 88 94 88 90 94 93 96 94 2012 93 94 85 74 2013 94 92 93 96 Geography, Politics and Sociology (GPS) NSS scores Geog & Env Sci Geography Politics Sociology 2010 84 82 80 79 2011 85 75 84 67 University Library
  29. 29. What have we learnt along the way? (2) • Circa 50% of the top 100 EBL titles are on Reading Lists • Circa 25% of the top 100 EBL titles feature on high holds lists • the remaining titles do not feature in any of our high demand print collections • ILL expenditure has declined at around £10K per annum since we introduced EBL University Library
  30. 30. Where we go from here…  Multi-yr analysis of usage trends by subject  Review subsequent use of patron selected stock - how does it compare with academic/library selected material?  Experiment with % share between patron led and academic-led stock selection – should it be 50:50?  Further analysis of impact of PDA on user satisfaction levels  Experiment with different vendors University Library
  31. 31. But this is only the beginning…  We need to …  Innovate – liberate ebooks from print procurement models  Re-Create - Break them down/mash them up  Observe and reflect on user behaviour  Listen to feedback  Be brave! – don’t be afraid of further experiments … University Library
  32. 32. Conclusions: Trying to keep the customer satisfied…       Is… Challenging, but also Essential to our service ethos A spur to creativity and innovation A work in progress Rewarding when we get it right University Library
  33. 33. Why is it challenging?  Library budgets still largely unable to keep pace with the many demands placed upon them  Annual growth in journal prices still persistently ahead of CPI and RPI  Bulk of resources budget now devoted to recurrent expenditure, much of it VATable  New subject interests typically emerge faster than old ones decline  Inflexibility of many big deals which account for lion’s share of the budget  Heightened user expectation, especially since higher fees introduced University Library
  34. 34. But don’t despair… We’ve come a long way since the C19… The Library service of 1894 could scarcely be said to be responsive to student needs... University Library
  35. 35. We have come along way, but we can go further! University Library
  36. 36. Thank you for your attention Jill.Taylor-Roe@ncl.ac.uk University Library

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