Carmen O'Dell and Barbara Sen JIBS-RLUK event July 2012

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RDM Rose by Carmen O'Dell and Barbara Sen, (University of Sheffield). Presentation at Demystifying Research Data: don’t be scared be prepared: A joint JIBS/RLUK event, Tuesday 17th July 17th July 2012, Brunei Gallery at SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies), London.

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  • JISC project RDM Rose which aims to develop open learning materials for taught course students and for practising librarians to improve their confidence and capability with RDMCarmen
  • why did we think RDM was something we ought to be concerned about at all?Firstly there is now widespread recognition of the vast range of data being created and the many issues surrounding keeping it both safe and accessibleSecondly, it’s no good expecting researchers to be able to deal with it all themselves – they don’t have the time, resources or frankly the inclination – looking after ‘stuff’ longterm is not their core businessIts also a completely new area with far more questions than answers at the moment which makes it really interesting and exciting – certainly makes a change from reading lists and interlibrary loan requests for examplePerhaps more controversially librarians need to make sure that their skillset matches what our users are going to really need and value in the future in an era where ‘its all on the web’ and cash-strapped institutions everywhere are looking to economizecarmen
  • So can and should libraries get involved with RDM?This pyramid, originally created by Martin Lewis, director of Sheffield Library, illustrates and groups together the types of activity libraries could participate in, although often this would need to be in partnership with other campus agencies such as computing or research support servicesAt the bottom of the coloured section you have what he describes as early engagement type activities eg. Teaching data literacy and then building on that experience you/your library should be in a position to help develop university data planning and strategy and at the top, some information professionals will be able to feed in their knowledge to developing national data policy. All of these are underpinned by basic data collection and management functions. Carmen
  • CarmenSo why though, should it be us doing this?Firstly, managing ‘stuff’ may not be the core business of researchers but it is ours – we have always managed, described and provided access to diverse collections and we’ve already adapted to the many format changes of recent yearsWe already liaise with and support academics, this is just an extension of thatRecognise that postgrads and researchers need to know about good RDM practice in just the same way as they need to know about copyright issues and citing references correctlyMany of us have already lead the way in our instutions on open access issuesAnd finally, the information profession is good at sharing best practice – we are all here for a start!Link to DaMSSIhttp://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/researcher-development-and-skills/data-management-and-information-literacyRIN collaborated with DCC and JISC to co-fund the Research Data Management Skills Support Initiative (DaMSSI), which ran from November 2010 to September 2011De-Word this!
  • Carmen;Why might we Not want to jump on the rdm bandwagonWe are already busy. Just to learn the new knowledge and skills is only half the battle – we need to keep them up to date afterwardsHow confident are we that we really know and understand the research process itself and how scholars in our subject area use information/data? The issues are complex and large scale – they are potentially relevant to every researcher in our institution in every subject area and by extension to every studentWe may see the library as having an expertise in metadata, but how does that translate to research data? How does collection development map to data appraisal?The evidence suggests that researchers do not see us as natural points of reference, even though we collect the electronic content they use for their lit reviews. Will they understand if we come to them talking about research data?The wider infrastructure to support data management barely existThese challenges illustrate a real need for information professionals to up their game, build on their existing skills and strengths and develop new competencies. Hence ‘RDM Rose’
  • Barbara – here onwardsThe main objectives of the project are to create a range of outputs that will support Library staff and students, enabling them to understand and engage with research data management as this area of our work develops and grows. The project will create and evaluate a range of learning materials tailored specifically for liaison librarians.These materials will be used as a basis for continuing professional development courses for existing staff, and to underpin a new module for postgraduate students on our MA Librarianship and Electronic and Digital Library Management Courses at Sheffield. The materials will all be open access, and available from the project website which went live last week. SO watch this space for details of our progress.
  • For us particularly in the early stages of the project there are three big questions to answer.How well does the teach/advise role hook into what we already do?We are already experienced at performing IL teaching, and supporting PGR students and researchers with access to research sources, and things like bibliographic software. We advise on Open access and institutional repositories, and give copyright advice. How does the developing RDM role fit into what we are already familiar with and comfortable with? So what are we not so familiar and comfortable with? What new or strengthened competencies do we need to develop?Knowledge of researchers’ information practicesKnowledge of best practices in data managementHigh level understanding of data curation lifecycleTechnical knowledge of data repository systemsTechnical knowledge of relevant metadata schemasWho is who among researchers in our own institution – and knowledge of other institutional stakeholders?Change management skillsProject management Who can help us in our professional network?Knowledge of funders’ mandatesKnowledge of our own institution’s policyHow to keep up-to-date ourselvesBest sources to refer researchers toDo we need to be actively involved in research?Do we need deep subject knowledge?If and when we acquire these news skills what will that mean for us as information professionals? What might this mean for us as professionals?Is this a new specialist role? Or is this an extension of existing roles?Will we see ourselves differently / present ourselves differently as “data librarians”? Will we have a new identity?How well does the teach/advise role hook into what we already do?IL training for studentsResearch training for PGRThe reference interviewPromoting open access and the institutional repositoryPromoting access to data sets in data archivesAdvising researchers on sources and bibliographic softwareWhat new or strengthened competencies do we need to develop?Knowledge of researchers’ information practicesKnowledge of best practices in data managementHigh level understanding of data curation lifecycleTechnical knowledge of data repository systemsTechnical knowledge of relevant metadata schemasWho is who among researchers in our own institution – and knowledge of other institutional stakeholders?Change management skillsProject management Who can help us in our professional network?Knowledge of funders’ mandatesKnowledge of our own institution’s policyHow to keep up-to-date ourselvesBest sources to refer researchers toDo we need to be actively involved in research?Do we need deep subject knowledge?Will we see ourselves differently / present ourselves differently as “data librarians”?What might this mean for us as professionals?Is this a new specialist role? Or is this an extension of existing roles?
  • The partnership to deliver the project consists of the White Rose Libraries together with the Sheffield Information School, supported by an advisory board of the great and the good, a number of experts in RDM who will be there to be called on as advisors at key stages of the project.
  • The Project Management team led by Andrew Cox the Programme Co-ordinator for our Digital Library Management programme at Sheffield brings together expertise across the White Rose Consortium, from practitioners, researchers, teaching staff, and managers. Key to getting the job done will be the appointment of a full time Research Assistant and Curriculum Developer, and we are hoping to put the advert out for that post later this week.
  • The projects starts this month and will run for about a year. The first task is to appoint the Research Assistant and Curriculum Developer. They, along with myself and Andrew will have a key role in running focus groups with the White Rose libraries to scope the course content. The focus groups will be key to understanding the existing knowledge base, identifying the skills gaps, and getting a clear understanding of the training requirements of the LIS staff.Once we have the understanding gained from the focus groups, we can start to develop the core material much of which will draw on existing material such as sources available from work done by the Digital Curation Centre. This will be supplemented by a number of case studies – which will be used to illustrate best practice, and be a focus for discussion and problem solving.The first courses will be delivered to Sheffield Library staff during the coming Autumn semester, and in the following semester with library staff at Leeds and York, and with our own Masters students at Sheffield.There will be ongoing evaluation of the teaching and training.We have yet to plan the subsequent dissemination of our results, but is likely that we will have a White Rose event, conference, outputs, journal papers, results on the website, and possible blogs and tweets.
  • So the project will produce not just academic output, but a range of practical deliverables – curriculum material, and CPD material, made openly available for all supporting practitioners and students.
  • Strengths of the project – well it addresses a very real need. There is an RDM buzz in libraryland at the moment.It brings together a wide range of professionals, exploiting the strengths of the White Rose consortium and beyond - and we are already benefitting from talking and working together more closely. The curriculum material will be developed in a very participative way with the potential users of that material having a real say in what is needed ensuring that it is fit for purpose, supports best practice, supports teaching, and future research. At stages in the project we hope to brings together existing professional staff with LIS students in a supported mutual learning context. Some of the evaluation of the project will include reflective diaries, as learners consider their learning needs and experiences. The relationship between learning and reflective practice having been shown to support deeper learning and encourage multiple perspectives on problems in the work place. SO this is an important approach to learning and builds on work we have done already at Sheffield on the relationship between reflective and learning, and reflection in the workplace.And lastly the resources will be openly available for all.
  • An opportunity – for raising our staff expertise. To develop our skills & competenciesTo exploit our networksTo produce open access re-useable resources for the wider information communityAn opportunity to work together, to learn together, to grow together ...
  • Carmen O'Dell and Barbara Sen JIBS-RLUK event July 2012

    1. 1. Research Data Management : Raising our staff expertise –Taught and CPD learning tailored for Information Professionals Funded by Carmen O’Dell Barbara Sen
    2. 2. In a nutshell• There is recognition of the growing scale of digital research data and need for its curation• Researchers are currently ill positioned to undertake long term stewardship of data (Pryor 2012)• Its an exciting area to get into and we can make a contribution• Libraries need to find a role in the era of big data
    3. 3. The Research Data Management Pyramid The library University Library. research for Libraries (Lewis, 2010: 16) Influence national data policy data Lead on local (Univ) data policy Identify pyramid Develop local data required curation data skills capacity with LIS schools Bring data Teach data into UG literacy to research- based post-grad Develop Develop learning library students Provide researcher researcher workforce data data advice data confidence awareness Data collection Appraise Prioritise Describe development & access Identify Select Preserve Present management layerMartin Lewis (2010) Information School lecture 2011-11-02 M
    4. 4. Why librarians?• Liaison, negotiation skills and contacts with academics• Knowledge of good information management, collection development, meta-data skills and practices• Understanding of research data management as a form of information literacy (IL) - DaMSSI• Open access leadership roles• Established LIS networks for sharing best practice a
    5. 5. Challenges• We are already over-taxed!• How deep is our understanding of research?• Complexity and scale of issues• Applying library skills to research data issues• Will researchers look to libraries for this support??• Resources, infrastructure, management structures have to be found
    6. 6. Objectives of the project: RDMRose• Create and evaluate learning materials about RDM tailored for liaison librarians• For Continuing Professional Development and Library & Information Management students• Web site – project progress, and open access materials http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/is/research/projects/rdmrose
    7. 7. Questions for us?• How well does the teach/advise role hook into what we already do?• What new or strengthened competencies do we need to develop?• Will we see ourselves differently / present ourselves differently as “data librarians”?
    8. 8. About the partnership• White Rose libraries: – Leeds, Sheffield and York, & iSchool, University of Sheffield• Advisory Board – Neil Beagrie – expert on digital preservation – D. Scott Brandt (D2C2) - Associate Dean for Research, Purdue University – Sheila Corrall – currently Prof. University of Sheffield; University of Pittsburg from August 2012 – Martin Lewis – Director of Library Service, University of Sheffield – Liz Lyon - Director of UKOLN and Associate Director , DCC – Andrew Thompson (DMSPpsych) University of Sheffield – Madeleine de Smaelen (3TU.Datacentrum)
    9. 9. Project Management Team• Led by the University of Sheffield, Project Director Andrew Cox and Project Manager Tim Nadin• Supported by: – Research Associate/Curriculum Developer – To be appointed – Brian Clifford, Deputy University Librarian (Head of Learning and Research Support), University of Leeds and Project Director, RoaDMaP – Denise Harrison, Head of the Learning and Research Services Team, Library, University of Sheffield. – Liz Waller, Deputy Director Information and Head of Information Services, University of York. – Matthew Zawadzki, Archivist and Records Manager, University of Sheffield. – Barbara Sen, Lecturer in Librarianship, Information School, University of Sheffield. – Carmen, O’Dell, Faculty Librarian for Science, University of Sheffield
    10. 10. Project• Starting July 2012– ending Summer 2013• Focus groups (White Rose libraries) will scope the knowledge base, skills gaps, and training requirements• Development of a core of material built round existing work• Case study material• Delivery and evaluation with Sheffield librarians (Autumn Semester 2012-13)• Iteration with Leeds and York and FT Sheffield masters students (Spring semester 2012-13)• Dissemination events
    11. 11. Deliverables• Curriculum material (lesson plans, case study, assignments etc) for other Information Departments as OER in Jorum• A module within our taught masters courses (but also available for stand alone study) – MSc Digital Library Management – MA Librarianship – Also MSc Information Management, Information Systems• A self study CPD version, with support forum – social media
    12. 12. Strengths of the Project• Addresses a very real need• Brings together practitioners, researchers, experts, teaching staff, managers, students – Sharing expertise, and promoting communication and understanding• Draws on expertise across organisations exploiting the strengths within the consortium and beyond• Participative curriculum development tailored for librarians• Provides outputs to support best practice, teaching, and research• Supported mutual learning, and engagement with reflective techniques• Continuous evaluation built into the project design• The resources will be made openly accessible
    13. 13. RDMRose - Research Data Management : Raising our staff expertise• An opportunity – To develop our skills & competencies – To exploit our networks – To produce open access re-useable resources for the wider information community – An opportunity to work together, to learn together, to grow together ...
    14. 14. References & sources• Corrall, S. (2012) Roles and responsibilities: libraries, librarians and data. In Pryor, G. (Ed.), Managing research data. (pp. 105-133). London: Facet.• DCC (2012) Digital Curation Lifecycle Model. Available from URL: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/curation-lifecycle-model Accessed 30th June 2012• Gabridge, T. (2009). ‘The last mile: liaison roles in curating science and engineering research data’, Research Libraries Issues, 265, 15- 21. http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/rli-265-gabridge.pdf• JISC. URL: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/• Jorum. URL: http://www.jorum.ac.uk/• Lewis, M.J. (2010) Libraries and the management of research data. In: Envisioning Future Academic Library Services. Facet Publishing, London. OA URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/11171/• Pryor, G. (2012) Managing research data. London: Facet.

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