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Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
Hillskemper Information Fluency
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Hillskemper Information Fluency

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A brief summary of information fluency and literacy for higher education that I created for a job interview in 2009.

A brief summary of information fluency and literacy for higher education that I created for a job interview in 2009.

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  • In general terms, Information Fluency is a combination of Information Literacy and Information Technology competency. Information Literacy , as defined by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL): Information literacy is a set of abilities requiring individuals to "recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate , evaluate , and use effectively the needed information.” Source: Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Association of College and Research Libraries, A Division of the American Library Association http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm
  • The first component of information literacy is the ability to locate the needed information. It’s important to differentiate between the two main types of information : Popular and Scholarly (or intellectual). Google has a major role in the location of popular information, but it can also be used as an initial jumping off point for the location of scholarly information, particularly Google Scholar. An important aspect of higher education is learning the ability to locate information beyond the popular surface web. Academic libraries offer many sources of scholarly and intellectual information, but students must be taught how to use these resources in order to become information-literate. Databases such as ScienceDirect, InfoMine, and Jstor offer thousands of peer-reviewed, scholarly articles and other documents. Sources: American Library Association . Presidential Committee on Information Literacy. Final Report .(Chicago: American Library Association, 1989.) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Association of College and Research Libraries, A Division of the American Library Association http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm
  • Sources: American Library Association . Presidential Committee on Information Literacy. Final Report .(Chicago: American Library Association, 1989.) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Association of College and Research Libraries, A Division of the American Library Association http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm
  • Sources: American Library Association . Presidential Committee on Information Literacy. Final Report .(Chicago: American Library Association, 1989.) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Association of College and Research Libraries, A Division of the American Library Association http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm
  • “ Fluency with technology focuses on understanding the underlying concepts of technology and applying problem-solving and critical thinking to using technology. information technology "fluency" focuses on a deep understanding of technology and graduated, increasingly skilled use of it.” Source: National Research Council. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications. Committee on Information Technology Literacy, Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Being Fluent with Information Technology . Publication. (Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1999) http://www.nap.edu/catalog/6482.html
  • Information fluency is important to students and faculty because it results in informed leaders. Source: North Georgia College & State University http://www.ngcsu.edu/il/qep_documentation.htm
  • When information literacy and information technology fluency are combined, the student takes away so much more from their higher education experience than rote memorization and “regurgitation” of information through testing. Students can be much more accomplished and much more prepared for a professional career when they are information-fluent. Students can be empowered and confident with information. “ Gaining skills in information literacy multiplies the opportunities for students’ self-directed learning , as they become engaged in using a wide variety of information sources to expand their knowledge , ask informed questions, and sharpen their critical thinking for still further self-directed learning.” Source: Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Association of College and Research Libraries, A Division of the American Library Association http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm
  • Source: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/informationliteracy/faculty.php University of Maryland, Baltimore County An information-fluent faculty stays current with information technology, which keeps them viable in the workplace of higher education and competitive in their subject field. Faculty also gain a greater understanding of the library’s role in education, and are able to advocate for library programs based on their collaboration with the library in information fluency initiatives.
  • RSS feeds and blogs may be from librarians, faculty, or the publisher websites of journals like Active Learning in Higher Education and The Journal of Academic Librarianship ; as well as industry journals specific to college courses. Internet resources include Educause ( http://www.educause.edu/ ), a nonprofit association whose mission is to advance higher education by promoting the intelligent use of information technology. Also, the New Media Consortium ( http://www.nmc.org ), who publishes The Horizon Report, “the centerpiece of NMC's Emerging Technologies Initiative , charts the landscape of emerging technologies for teaching, learning and creative expression and produces the NMC’s annual Horizon Report.” Source: http://www.nmc.org/horizon NMC’s Emerging Technologies Initiative involves these 4 components: Convene people around ideas . Catalyze dialog and new ideas. Build Community - engage people. Contribute - produce things . Source: http://www.nmc.org/initiatives/emerging-technology
  • Another way to share information is through a LibGuide, which is a web-based, collaborative version of a subject guide or pathfinder. Sources: University of Tasmania LibGuide on http://utas.libguides.com/maritime_business East Carolina http://libguides.ecu.edu/maritime_studies Springshare LibGuides main page http://www.springshare.com/libguides/ Springshare LibGuides community page (can be browsed or searched) http://www.libguides.com/community.php
  • Another aspect of maturing an information fluency program is providing patrons with online help and tutorial resources for access at any time, like screencast tutorials and podcasts. Many database tutorials are available directly from the vendor (like Web of Science), so simply providing a link to them is easy and free.
  • Finally, maintain open communication with faculty and continuously monitor and measure the effectiveness of information fluency education with assessment. Methods of assessment include: assignments, tests, and surveys. “ Incorporating information literacy across curricula, in all programs and services, and throughout the administrative life of the university, requires the collaborative efforts of faculty, librarians, and administrators.” Source: Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Association of College and Research Libraries, A Division of the American Library Association http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm
  • Transcript

    • 1. INFORMATION FLUENCY Julie Hillskemper Academic librarian job candidate presentation, August 2009
    • 2. What is INFORMATION FLUENCY? Julie Hillskemper
    • 3. Julie Hillskemper An important aspect of higher education is learning the ability to locate information beyond the popular surface web. Deep Web databases such as ScienceDirect, InfoMine, and JStor offer thousands of peer-reviewed, scholarly articles and other documents. Defining Information Literacy, part 1
    • 4. Defining Information Literacy, part 2 <ul><li>Evaluate information determine a source’s </li></ul><ul><li>Legitimacy </li></ul><ul><li>Relevancy </li></ul><ul><li>Currency </li></ul>Julie Hillskemper
    • 5. Defining Information Literacy, part 3 Effectively use information Translate the information into intellectual product for academic and professional purposes. Julie Hillskemper
    • 6. Information Technology Competence <ul><li>Understand the underlying concepts of technology </li></ul><ul><li>Apply problem-solving and critical thinking to technology use </li></ul><ul><li>Graduated, increasingly skilled use of technology </li></ul>Julie Hillskemper
    • 7. Why is information fluency important to students and faculty? Julie Hillskemper
    • 8. Importance to Students <ul><li>Information fluency offers opportunities for: </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Directed Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge Expansion </li></ul><ul><li>Sharpening Critical Thinking Skills </li></ul>Julie Hillskemper
    • 9. Importance to Faculty <ul><li>“ The principles of information fluency can be used to help faculty clarify teaching objectives, assignment design, and goals in classroom learning. “ </li></ul>Julie Hillskemper
    • 10. Key Ways to Mature an Information Fluency Program <ul><li>Information fluency librarians should keep current on emerging information and instructional technologies. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: RSS Feeds and Blogs, Journals </li></ul><ul><li>and organizational websites like Educause and The New Media Consortium </li></ul>Julie Hillskemper
    • 11. Key Ways to Mature an Information Fluency Program <ul><li>Information Fluency librarians should also be members of professional organizations like </li></ul><ul><li>American Library Association (ALA) and applicable divisions/chapters </li></ul><ul><li>Special Libraries Association </li></ul>Julie Hillskemper
    • 12. Key Ways to Mature an Information Fluency Program <ul><li>Information Fluency librarians should share the information with faculty on a regular basis. Many libraries have their own RSS feeds or provide links to RSS feeds via their websites. A library staff wiki on the intranet can provide faculty with information and updates in an organized format. </li></ul>Julie Hillskemper
    • 13. Key Ways to Mature an Information Fluency Program Julie Hillskemper Examples of Academic Library Maritime Lib Guides <ul><li>Academic libraries use LibGuides for: </li></ul><ul><li>General subject guides </li></ul><ul><li>Course-specific guides </li></ul><ul><li>&amp;quot;How to&amp;quot; guides for library services </li></ul><ul><li>Library instruction and information literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Staff collaboration/communication </li></ul>
    • 14. Key Ways to Mature an Information Fluency Program Julie Hillskemper <ul><ul><li> Provide patrons with online help and tutorial resources for access anytime like screencast tutorials and podcasts . </li></ul></ul>
    • 15. Key Ways to Mature an Information Fluency Program Julie Hillskemper <ul><li>open communication with faculty </li></ul><ul><li>monitor and measure effectiveness with assessment </li></ul>
    • 16. Questions? Comments? Julie Hillskemper Thank you for your time

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