Flipping CELTA

  • 1,913 views
Uploaded on

My experiences with using the flipped classroom approach for celta input

My experiences with using the flipped classroom approach for celta input

More in: Education , Career
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,913
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • In relation to Bloom’s taxonomy (Bloom et al 1956), this allows the class time to be utilised for tasks requiring higher order thinking skills (analysing, evaluation and creation) at a time when the teacher’s help is available.
  • This approach is deeply grounded in social constructivism, Vygotsky contending that education is not imitation, but is the development of higher psychological functions through the use of language to mediate understanding (Vygotsky 1978). Providing opportunities for learners to construct new knowledge and cement understanding of new concepts as they are processed in talk with others is therefore an essential part of learning and is a central tenet of the ‘flipped’ approach.
  • ‘Flipping’ the classroom is an idea rooted in the pedagogy of higher education seminars. Students are given work, typically readings, to do before class and face to face time is spent discussing, debating and critically appraising the material in order to better process and understand it.
  • Introduction of technology has taken it to another level
  • 15 weeksone group were taught using only on-line methods and the second were taught using a hybrid methodology, accessing on-line presentations as well as twice weekly 50 minute face to face collaborative sessions, the course being only seven and a half weeks in comparison to the 15 week on-line course. Although both groups of students studied for a similar amount of time per week, the hybrid group did as well or better than their on-line only counterparts, despite the fact that the hybrid group had had only half as much study time, showing a very significant advantage to this form of learning. Additionally, when students were tested six months later, the hybrid group seemed to show better retention of learning
  • . Important pioneers of this movement in the States have been Bergman and Sams (2012) working at Woodland Park High School.
  • Khan’s work in the sphere of maths instruction, now backed by Google and Gates’ Foundation funding has also given the idea both publicity and kudos.
  • The most important input sessions are loaded towards the beginning of the course but with teaching practice being an integral part of the course from the first week, it is inevitable that relevant input lags behind its practical execution by some trainees. This is not necessarily disadvantageous, as trainees often have better schema in input sessions for these particular concepts with some previous experience but feedback at the end of the course often reveals their discomfort at this arrangement.
  • The potential benefits are that the input will be available to the trainees on-line, allowing them to work through the material at their own pace, that the trainees will be able to visit and revisit the input material at any stage in the course, allowing them further opportunities to learn and more support with the assignment. Most importantly, whilst the input sessions currently are quite practical in nature and do include collaborative tasks, removing the presentation aspect of the session will allow more face to face time with a supervising tutor, to practise the new skills. In addition to these points, trainees will have access to important material earlier in the course if they wish to access it. This may be of importance with concept checking and analysing material but will have even further resonance with other sessions such as classroom management, lesson planning, teaching vocabulary or receptive skills.
  • The potential benefits are that the input will be available to the trainees on-line, allowing them to work through the material at their own pace, that the trainees will be able to visit and revisit the input material at any stage in the course, allowing them further opportunities to learn and more support with the assignment. Most importantly, whilst the input sessions currently are quite practical in nature and do include collaborative tasks, removing the presentation aspect of the session will allow more face to face time with a supervising tutor, to practise the new skills. In addition to these points, trainees will have access to important material earlier in the course if they wish to access it. This may be of importance with concept checking and analysing material but will have even further resonance with other sessions such as classroom management, lesson planning, teaching vocabulary or receptive skills.
  • The potential benefits are that the input will be available to the trainees on-line, allowing them to work through the material at their own pace, that the trainees will be able to visit and revisit the input material at any stage in the course, allowing them further opportunities to learn and more support with the assignment. Most importantly, whilst the input sessions currently are quite practical in nature and do include collaborative tasks, removing the presentation aspect of the session will allow more face to face time with a supervising tutor, to practise the new skills. In addition to these points, trainees will have access to important material earlier in the course if they wish to access it. This may be of importance with concept checking and analysing material but will have even further resonance with other sessions such as classroom management, lesson planning, teaching vocabulary or receptive skills.
  • Already stressed and stretched….
  • But once they’re made, they’re reusable and can use mine!
  • How I made the videos – Camtasia but Brainshark or other free screen capture tools could be used.
  • Second trial better but still no better than before
  • I absolutely don’t see this as a replacement for further reading, or even as a comprehensive grammar course – just a help for trainees to get a foot in the door.
  • I absolutely don’t see this as a replacement for further reading, or even as a comprehensive grammar course – just a help for trainees to get a foot in the door.
  • I had people who were novice teachers as well as pre-celta trainees
  • xbns86

Transcript

  • 1. ‘Flipping’ CELTAJoGakongaYouTube video available athttp://youtu.be/kDpWj34oZow
  • 2. What is the‘flipped’classroom?
  • 3. Traditionalclass
  • 4. Flipped classFlippedclass
  • 5. The theory…..
  • 6. Socialconstructivistapproach
  • 7. Promoteslearnerautonomy
  • 8. A brief history…..
  • 9. Lovett, Meyer, and Thille (2008)on-linedeliveryface to facedelivery
  • 10. Lovett, Meyer, and Thille (2008)on-linedelivery‘flipped’delivery
  • 11. Coming to class ready
  • 12. Bergman and Sams
  • 13. Salman Khan The Khan AcademyTED.com
  • 14. What does all thishave to do withCELTA?…..
  • 15. Notoriously intensiveLimited time for input
  • 16. Practical elementoften comes beforeinput
  • 17. Potentialbenefits….
  • 18. Come to class‘ready’
  • 19. ‘Frees up’input time
  • 20. PreviewandRevisit
  • 21. Assignment supportLA assignment
  • 22. Potentialproblems….
  • 23. No internet access
  • 24. They don’t watch thevideos..
  • 25. More work for tutors…..
  • 26. The trial….
  • 27. Focus on CCQs andlanguage analysis
  • 28. LA AssignmentPart 1Vocabulary – definition, contextand CCQSPart 2Structures – MFP analysis, contextand CCQS
  • 29. Camtasia Studio
  • 30. How long?15 minutes maxQuizzes
  • 31. http://elttraining.mdl2.com/mod/page/view.php?id=168
  • 32. Recapinclass
  • 33. The result….
  • 34. Usually 3 – 4 out of 6 have torewriteThis time 6/ 6 in my group did!
  • 35. So, was thisuseless?….
  • 36. Videos watchedwatchedwatched morethan oncenot watched
  • 37. It mixes it up a bit from therigour/ boredom of books..
  • 38. ..and the content is ’bite-sized’
  • 39. ‘I found them beneficial as youcan stop & start as youplease….
  • 40. …...it felt like a 1-2-1 lesson!
  • 41. Watching the video really made thelesson easy to follow in class.The videos prepare you forthe lesson and get youthinking…
  • 42. WOW thank you! Im justplanning for Day 3 - Thisassisted so much as wehave yet to cover this intraining but have beenasked to provide CCQs inmy lesson - I am foreverin your debt, THANK YOUTHANK YOU THANK YOU!^-^
  • 43. Finalthoughts….
  • 44. Thomas Edison
  • 45. All materials available free atwww.elt-training.com(and on YouTube)