Senegal for convo, 2008

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Senegal for convo, 2008

  1. 1. Senegal, 2008 A World View Study Trip
  2. 2. Senegal in Africa
  3. 3. A Little About Senegal <ul><li>Former French Colony; Free since 1960 </li></ul><ul><li>One of the most stable democracies in Africa </li></ul><ul><li>Many young people (only 3% of the population is over the age of 65 and the median age is 18) </li></ul><ul><li>Predominantly Muslim (94 %) </li></ul><ul><li>Many ethnic groups – the most prominent is the Wolof ethnic group (43%) </li></ul>
  4. 4. President Wade
  5. 5. Our Host – the WARC
  6. 6. Purposes for the Trip <ul><li>To learn about the history and culture of Senegal </li></ul><ul><li>To experience life in a “developing nation” </li></ul><ul><li>To compare and contrast the educational system with that of the United States </li></ul>
  7. 7. Each morning—French bread and coffee to wake us.
  8. 8. Dr. Painter and Josephine Tendeng
  9. 9. The Millennium Gate
  10. 10. President Wade’s Palace
  11. 11. Place of Remembrance
  12. 12. Preparing School Gifts
  13. 13. L-R’s Contribution
  14. 14. Sailing to Ile de Goree
  15. 16. Our guide on Goree
  16. 18. Freed Slave Statue
  17. 20. The Infamous “Door of No Return”
  18. 21. What a strange feeling!
  19. 22. Punishment Cell
  20. 23. Life Upstairs
  21. 24. View from the top balcony
  22. 25. The Atlantic Slave Trade
  23. 26. Tools of the Trade
  24. 27. Memory of the horrors remains, as depicted by a sand painting artist
  25. 28. The church on Goree
  26. 29. Our group on the steps of the “House of Slaves”
  27. 30. After returning to Dakar, we visited many schools.
  28. 31. Giving our little gifts
  29. 32. And learning about public and private schools
  30. 33. From Pre-School
  31. 34. To university level
  32. 35. From well equipped “model” schools
  33. 36. to an outdoor Koranic school
  34. 37. The “Empire des Enfants” was one of the most moving visits we made
  35. 38. With financial help from many organizations, such as Rotary, they rescue street boys
  36. 39. … who learn a trade and contribute by making crafts for sale
  37. 40. We also learned about Sufi Islam as practiced in Senegal.
  38. 41. … and about Marabouts and Talibes
  39. 42. One day we drove east from Dakar
  40. 43. … to the city of Touba
  41. 44. Touba is the holy city of the Mouride brotherhood, founded by Cheikh Amadou Bamba
  42. 45. Bamba is buried in the Great Mosque of Touba.
  43. 46. We dressed to respect Islamic customs,
  44. 47. We were only allowed to visit the exterior of the Great Mosque.
  45. 48. Two nights at Toubab Dialaw exposed us more to African arts and music.
  46. 49. Later, back in Dakar, we visited more mosques. This is the Mosque de la Divinite.
  47. 50. Allowed inside one of the Dakar mosques,
  48. 51. we found it very beautiful.
  49. 53. We learned some Wolof…
  50. 54. … tasted the Senegalese cuisine….
  51. 55. … learned about Mbalax, a fusion of popular Western music and dance such as jazz , soul , Latin , and rock blended with sabar , the traditional drumming and dance music of Senegal
  52. 56. … and made new friends
  53. 57. Want to know more? <ul><li>West African Research Center http://www.warc-croa.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>World View http://www.unc.edu/world/ </li></ul>
  54. 58. Teaching about Senegal… <ul><li>HIS 351 Africa in Transition: Senegal & South Africa – offered Spring 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>EDU 274 Global Education -- offered Summer, Fall and Spring each year </li></ul>

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