• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Msk imaging paleoanthropo jd laredo
 

Msk imaging paleoanthropo jd laredo

on

  • 299 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
299
Views on SlideShare
299
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Msk imaging paleoanthropo jd laredo Msk imaging paleoanthropo jd laredo Presentation Transcript

    • JFIM  2013:   The  pelvis:   An  anatomical  comparison  in  animal   species  and  evolu=on     Jean-­‐Denis  Laredo   MSK  radiologist   Denis  Diderot  Paris  University     And  CNRS  7051  
    • Age  of  the  world  and  animals   •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  Universe:  13.8  billion  years  («  Big  bang  »)   Earth:  4.54  billion  years   Vertebrates  :  500  million  years  (aqua=c  first)   Dinosaurus:  100-­‐50  million  years   Mammalians:  50  million  years   Primates  35  million  years   Hominidae-­‐Big  Monkeys  (Apes)  10-­‐15  million  years   Common  ancestor  to  big  monkeys  and  humans:  7  million  years   Australopithecus:  3  million  years   Homo  Habilis:  1.8  million  years   Homo  sapiens:  1  million  years   Homo  sapiens  sapiens:  100,000  years  
    • Primates=  simiens  &  prosimiens   Hominoïdes   Catarrhiniens   Cercopithécoïdes   Simiens   Platyrrhiniens   Babouin,   Macaque  
    • Hominoïdes   Gibbons   Tall  Monkeys   (grands  singes)   «  Apes  »:  Orang-­‐ outan,  Chimpanzé,   Gorille   Hominides   Australopithecus   Homo  
    • Hominides  history   Foot  steps  in  Laetoli  (Tanzania)   Australopithecus  afarensis  (Lucy),  3  million  years  
    • Rie  valley  &  Yves  Copens  theory  
    • Primate  habitat   •  Most  primates  have  their  natural  environment   in  the  trees  
    • Primates  habitat  &  locomo=on   Tree  Brachia=on   Tree   Quadrupeds     Bonobo  (chimpanzee) Gibbons  (hylobates)   Ground   quadrupeds   Big  monkeys   Bonobo  (chimpanzee)   Ground  bipeds   Hominidae  
    • Tree  brachia=on  versus  quadrupedalism   Gibbons  (hylobates)   Bonobo  (pan  paniscus,  small   chimpanzee)  
    • Human  (Bipeds)  anatomic   characteris=cs?  
    • Bipeds  characteris=cs   •  Hand  and  opposing  thumb  allowing  hand   grip?  
    • Human  (Bipeds)  anatomic  characteris=cs   •  Hand  and  opposing  thumb  allowing  hand  grip:  No!  
    • Human  (Bipeds)  anatomic  characteris=cs   1.  Foot!  Humans  have  a  specific  foot  anatomy   The  Bonobo  has  4  hands   Homo   Homo  :  M1-­‐M2  joint  
    • Human  (Bipeds)  anatomic  characteris=cs   1.  Foot!  highly  specialised  in  bipeds   Bonobo   Homo,  hallux  valgus  
    • Foot  steps  in  Laetoli  (Tanzania)   Australopithecus  afarensis  (Lucy),  3  million  years  
    • Human  (Bipeds)  anatomic  characteris=cs   1.  Foot!  highly  specialised  in  bipeds   2.  Long  femoral  neck                                Cow                                          Bonobo              Lucy(Australopithecus)    Homo  habilis            Homo  sapiens                    
    • Human  femur   •  Femoral  head:  2/3  of  a  sphere   •  Weight-­‐bearing                          
    • Human  femur   •  Femoral  head:  2/3  of  a  sphere   •  Weight-­‐bearing                        Propensity  to  subchondral  fracture  
    • Human  femur   •  Femoral  head:  2/3  of  a  sphere  (extended  car=lage)   •  Poor  vascularisa=on                    Propensity  to  avascular  necrosis  
    • Human  (Bipeds)  anatomic  characteris=cs   1.  Foot!  highly  specialised  in  bipeds   2.  Femoral  neck   3.  Pelvis  
    • Human  (Bipeds)  anatomic  characteris=cs   1.  Foot!  highly  specialised  in  bipeds   2.  Femoral  neck   3.  Pelvis   Quadrupeds   Cow   Bonobo      Bipeds    Lucy   Homo  sapiens  
    • Pelvis  muscles   abdominal   wall   muscles   Lumbar  spine   extensionL.   Pelvis   equilibrium   Thigh   muscles  
    • Homo   Lucy  
    • Homo   Lucy  
    • Hip  joint   •  Any  joint  is  a  compromise  between  mobility   and  stability   •  Tree  quadrupeds  (Monkeys):            Mobility  >>  stability  
    • Human  hip  joint   •  Ground  bipeds  (homo):     ü Shoulder  :  mobility  >>  stability   ü Hip  joint  :  weight-­‐bearing                                              stability  >>  mobility                                              high  joint  congruence  
    • Human  hip  joint   •  Weight-­‐bearing   •  High  congruence   •  High  fric=on                    Propensity  to  wearing  :  hip  osteoarthri=s  
    • Human  (Bipeds)  anatomic  characteris=cs   1.  2.  3.  Foot   Femoral  neck   Pelvis   4.  Lumbar  Lordosis   5.  Shorter  upper  limb                      (70%  of  the  lower    limb)    Symphalangius   Chimpanzee   Homo  sapiens  
    • Human  (Bipeds)  anatomic  characteris=cs   1.  2.  3.  Foot   Femoral  neck   Pelvis   4.  Lumbar  Lordosis   5.  Shorter  upper  limb   6.  Foramen  magnum                  below  the  skull     Homo  sapiens    Orang  
    • The  standing  posi=on   La  sta=on  debout  
    • Georges  Charpak  discovery:   Highly  sensi=ve  X-­‐ray  detector  in  a  gazeous  phase   Low  dose  simultaneous  standing  AP  &  lateral  full  body  radiographs  
    • Human  pelvis  is  submired  to  high   compression  forces  
    • How  to  resist  to  these  compression   forces  ?  
    • G.  Morvan  
    • C7 Plumb line Economic equilibrium: • Lumbar lordosis • Thoracic kyphosis • C7 Plumb Line
    • Pelvic  anteversion,  lumbar  lordosis  &  thoracic   kyphosis  allow  adapta=on  to  anterior  trunk   bending  
    • Pelvic  incidence   (Duval-­‐Beaupère)  
    • How  to  resist  to  these  compression   forces  ?   Pelvic  incidence:  mean  55°  (35-­‐70)  
    • How  to  resist  to  these  compression  forces  ?   G.  Morvan  
    • Surgical  treatment  of  degenera=ve   sta=c  malalignements  of  the  spine   •  Pierre  Guigui   Chief  of  Orthopaedic  surgery   Denis  Diderot  Paris  University  
    • 1994   1994   1995  
    • 2001  
    • 2001   2001  
    • 2001   2001  
    • Extension   2001   2002   Flexion  
    • Extension   2001   2002   Flexion  
    • Extension   2001   2002   Flexion  
    • Importance  du  grand  cliché  
    • Locomo=on  
    • Motion Life  is  mo=on   «  Mo5on  is  at  the  root  of  all  ac5ons  »   E"enne  Jules  Marey  (1830  –  1904)     «  Le  mouvement  est  l’acte  le  plus  important  en  ce  sens  que  toutes  les   fonc5ons  empruntent  son  concours  pour  s’accomplir.  »  
    • Primate  locomo=on   Tree  Brachia=on   Tree   Quadrupeds     Ground   quadrupeds   Big  monkeys   Ground  bipeds   Hominidae  
    • Bipedalism  locomo=on  
    • Homo  is  not  the  only  animal  using  bipedalism     La  bipédie  n’est  pas  le  propre  de  l’homme  
    • Foot  steps  in  Laetoli  (Tanzania)   Australopithecus  afarensis  (Lucy),  3  million  years  
    • Big  monkeys:  quadrupeds  in  trees  and  on  the  ground   Occasionnal  bipeds  
    • Tree  brachia=on  versus  quadrupedalism   Gibbons  (hylobates)   Bonobo  (pan  paniscus,  small   chimpanzee)  
    • Hallux  rigidus  
    • Humanoïde  Robot     J e a n -­‐ P a u l   L a u m o n d    
    • En guise de conclusion Faire  marcher  un  robot   Synergie  sciences  de  la  vie  et  robo=que  
    • HRP2 Capteurs  et  ac=onneurs   4  caméras   Gyroscope   30  moteurs   DC Motor with Ironless Rotor Accéléromètres   Pulley Harmonic Drive Gear Timing Belt Pulley 4  Capteurs  d’effort  
    • La marche : niveau cognitif La  marche  d’HRP2  
    • Sous–actionnement : la marche La  marche  d’HRP2   Centre  de  pression   Centre  de  masse   Kajita  et  al,  IEEE  ICRA,  2003  
    • Locomotion Robot  and  human:  two  different  models   Kajita  et  al,  IEEE  ICRA,  2003   A.  Berthoz,  T.  Pozzo,  Posture  and  Gaits  ,Elsevier,    1988   E"enne  Jules  Marey  ©  Cinémathèque  Française    
    • VALUE  OF  BILATERAL     STANDING  OBLIQUE  RADIOGRAPHS     («  FAUX  PROFIL  DE  LEQUESNE  »)     IN  THE  DIAGNOSIS  OF     HIP  OSTEOARTHRITIS  
    • The  acetabulum  can  be  described  as  a  croissant   Apical   Roof    Posterior     Horn     Anterior   Roof   Anterior     Horn  
    • However,  the  AP  radiograph  only  profiles  the  apical   roof  of  the  acetabulum.   Apical  Roof  
    • Standing  oblique  of  the  hip     «  faux-­‐profil  »  de  Lequesne   X-­‐Ray   Target  hip   65°   Lequesne,  M.G.Laredo,  J.D.  The  faux  profil  (oblique  view)  of  the  hip  in  the  standing  posi5on.  Contribu5on  to  the  evalua5on  of  osteoarthri5s  of   the  adult  hip.  Ann  Rheum  Dis,  1998    
    •    The  SO  view  profiles  the  posterior  horn,  apical  roof   and  anterior  roof  of  the  hip  in  contact  with  the   radiographic  table,  the  “target”  hip.       Anterior     Roof     Anterior   Roof       Apical  Roof       Posterior     Horn   Target  Hip   Right  Hip      
    •  The  Lequesne  Standing  Oblique  is  more  sensi=ve  than  the   AP  Pelvis  view  for  the  diagnosis  of  early  OA     Lequesne  M.  ARD  1998   Conrozier  T.  O&C  1998   Vignon  E.  J  Rheumatol  2004       Normal   OA  
    • Pa=ent  posi=oning  in  Lyon  Schuss   (1)  Cassere,  (2)  feet  cushion,  (3)  Fluoroscopy  
    •    The  SO  view  profiles  the  posterior  horn,  apical  roof   and  anterior  roof  of  the  hip  in  contact  with  the   radiographic  table,  the  “target”  hip.       Anterior     Roof     Anterior   Roof       Apical  Roof       Posterior     Horn   Target  Hip   Right  Hip      
    • Double  oblique  de  profil   Contre-­‐ Faux-­‐ Profil:   Non-­‐target  Hip   Corne   antérieure   Faux-­‐   Profil:   Target  Hip   Corne   postérieure   65°   Lequesne,  M.G.Laredo,  J.D.  The  faux  profil  (oblique  view)  of  the  hip  in  the  standing  posi5on.  Contribu5on  to  the  evalua5on  of  osteoarthri5s  of   the  adult  hip.  Ann  Rheum  Dis,  1998     Laredo,  J.D.,  Le  contre-­‐faux-­‐profil  de  hanche.  en  cours  de  publica=on  
    •  The  SO  view  profiles  the  apical  roof,  anterior  roof   and  anterior  horn  of  the  contralateral  hip,  distant   from  the  table,  the  “non-­‐target”  hip.       Apical  Roof   Anterior   Roof     Anterior   Horn     Non-­‐target  Hip   Right  Hip  
    •  Bilateral  standing  oblique  (SO)  radiographs  of  the  pelvis   profile  the  full  hip  joint  space.         Anterior     Roof       Apical  Roof   Anterior   Roof     Apical  Roof   Anterior   Horn         Posterior     Horn   Target  Hip   Non-­‐target  Hip   Right  Hip  
    •       Anterior     Roof           Apical   Anterior   Roof   Roof     Apical   Roof   Anterior   Horn     Posterior     Horn   Anterior   Roof     Target  Hip     Non-­‐target  Hip   Apical   Roof   Anterior   Roof     Anterior     Horn    Posterior   Horn   Right  Hip  
    • Results  1:    AP  view   Normal  JSW  measurements:  JSW  gradient     Vap   L   Mean mm ± sd 5.02 ± 0.74 Vap 4.65 ± 1.1 M AP  view   Measurement Point L M   4.28 ± 1.09
    • Results  1:  Standing  Oblique   Normal  JSW  measurements:  JSW  gradient     Measurement Point AR PH   SO  view  :  Target  Hip   5.18± 1.2 4.43± 0.92 PS 3.69± 0.69 PH 3± 0.55 AR/PH ratio PS   Mean mm ±sd Vct AR         Vct   1.77± 0.48
    • Results  1:  Descrip=ve  results   Contralateral  Standing  Oblique   Normal  JSW  measurements       Measurement Point Mean mm ± sd IAH 3.83 ± 0.23 SAH 5.34 ± 1.04 Vdt Vdt   SAH   5.39 ± 1.14 IAH   SO  view  :  Non-­‐target    Hip  
    • Results  2   ANOVA:  Overt  OA  versus  Controls     Vap 0.00458* Vct 0.00029* AR/PH ratio 0.00007* IAH 0.00969* SAH 0.0112* AP View Standing Oblique Target Hip Standing Oblique Non-target Hip PH   SO  view:  Target  Hip   Vdt   M   PS   0.0375* PH AR         Vct   0.0322* AR   Vap   L   SAH   IAH   AP   SO  view:  Non-­‐target  Hip  
    •   Results  2   AR         Vct   ANOVA:  Incipient  OA  versus   Controls   Standing Oblique Target Hip PH 0.00446* IAH 0.00128* SAH 0.0687 PH   0.02004* AR/PH ratio Standing Oblique Target Hip SO  view:  Target  Hip   Vdt   M   Vap   PS   L   SAH   IAH   AP   SO  view:  Non-­‐target  Hip  
    • Results  3   Logis=c  regression  analysis   View Logistic Regression to predict Incipient OA versus Controls                 OR[95%CI] Antero-Posterior View   Measurement Point - - Standing  Oblique    Contact  Hip     PH 2.405 [1.184 ; 4.886] AR/PH ratio 0.273 [0.095 ; 0.787] SAH 0.556 [0.345 ; 0.894]     Standing  Oblique  Distant  Hip                 AR         Vct   Vdt   SAH   PS   IAH   PH   SO  view:  Target  Hip   SO  view:  Non-­‐target  Hip  
    • Results  4   Thresholds  that  maximalize  accuracy   Threshold that maximizes accuracy (mm) AR View Measurement Point 4.4 Target  Hip   SO  view   Non-target Hip SO view SAH IAH 1 4,04 Specificity PPV NPV 34,78 100 100 58.1 (16.38-57.27) (87.66-100) (63,06-100) (44.8-70.5) 50 (30.6-69.4) PH AR/PH ratio Sensitivity 91.9 82.4 70.8 (78.1-98.3) (56.6-96.2) (55.9-83) ACCURACY 59.7 (47-71.5) 73.8 (61.5-84) 91,67 67,92 72,31 39,29 97,3 (61,52-99,7 (53,68-80,0 (59,81-82,69 (21,5-59,42) (85,84-99,03) 9) 8) ) 80 66,67 41,38 91,89 69,7 (51,91-95,6 (52,08-79,2 (23,52-61,06) (78,09-98,3) (57,15-41) 7) 4) 75 (34.9-96.8) 100 (71.5-100) 100 84.6 89.5 (54.1-100) (54.6-98.1) (66.9-98.7)
    • Conclusions   •  JSW  measurements  on  bilateral  SO  radiographs  allow   diagnosis  of  early  hip  OA  not  shown  by  the  standing   AP  pelvis  radiograph.     •  Measurement  of  the  AR/PH  JSW  ra=o  provides  the   best  diagnos=c  performances.       AR         Vct   Vdt   SAH   PS   IAH   PH   SO  view:  Target  Hip   SO  view:  Non-­‐target  Hip  
    • •  Three different anatomical types of hip osteoarthriti anterosuperolateral OA Avant posteroinfero-medial OA anterosuperomedial OA