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  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management. Intrinsic means from within; when you have a drive to succeed and are motivated by purpose, passion, and mission.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management. Extrinsic rewards are often temporary and driven by money, recognition and results.
  • Fringe Benefits This slide displays the most common perks or rewards used by companies to motivate employees. Other examples of extrinsic rewards include the following: Pay Improved working environment or conditions Status Security While these rewards do offer some value, there is much research that indicates many problems with extrinsic motivation. Share with the students some of those ideas: Extrinsic rewards do not produce permanent changes Extrinsic rewards reduce intrinsic interest The use of extrinsic rewards can be controlling Reinforcement of extrinsic rewards can lead to expectations of permanence in the form of job rewards.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management. Are You Stressed? Employers can often spot impending stress or on-the-job stress by understanding the signs listed. Ask the students: Have you experienced any of these symptoms when trying to juggle your academic, professional, and personal lives? What did you do to cope with the rigors of stress? Share the following tips for reducing stress: Learn to plan. Recognize and accept limits. Be a positive person. Learn to tolerate and forgive. Avoid unnecessary competition. Get regular exercise. Learn a systematic, drug-free method of relaxing. Change your thinking. Source: UTexas.edu
  • See Learning Goal 3: Identify the levels of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and apply them to employee motivation.
  • See Learning Goal 3: Identify the levels of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and apply them to employee motivation. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs This slide reproduces the illustration of Maslow’s Hierarchy from the chapter. Most people in the class, especially those that have taken basic psychology, may be familiar with Maslow and the premise of human needs hierarchy. Use this opportunity to relate Maslow’s need theory to the work environment: Workers require competitive salaries, benefits and clean work environments. Employees have the need for security against termination in their jobs and the feeling of being safe against bodily harm while performing their job functions. On the job, workers have the need to feel a part of a successful group, driven by achievement. Employees seek opportunities for advancement, empowerment, recognition, and responsibility through additional work-related performance. Companies must attempt to satisfy these needs through opportunities within the organization.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg. Herzberg’s article in the Harvard Business Review, “One More Time: How Do You Motivate Employees?” is a classic and explores his idea of job content in depth.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg. Herzberg’s Theory This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs. This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel. The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following: Achievement Recognition Work Itself Responsibility Advancement Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg. Comparison of the Theories of Maslow and Herzberg This slide gives students a good starting point to see the relationship between Maslow and Herzberg. To start a discussion ask students if they are motivated by money? This question always starts a discussion with most students stating that money is a real motivating factor. Follow-up this discussion with the following: If you dislike your current job and your boss offers you more money will it change your feelings about your job in the long run?
  • See Learning Goal 6: Explain the key principles of goal-setting, expectancy, reinforcement, and equity theories.
  • See Learning Goal 6: Explain the key principles of goal-setting, expectancy, reinforcement, and equity theories. Peter Drucker developed the idea of MBO in his 1954 book The Practice of Management.
  • See Learning Goal 6: Explain the key principles of goal-setting, expectancy, reinforcement, and equity theories. Organizations Using MBO Management By Objectives (MBO) was popularized by Peter Drucker in the 1950s. Ask students: What are the benefits of MBO? (This theory is based on the notion that setting attainable goals with all employees of the organization will create more support for the goals leading to greater motivation.) To better understand Peter Drucker visit the following website: http://www.druckerinstitute.com/
  • See Learning Goal 6: Explain the key principles of goal-setting, expectancy, reinforcement, and equity theories. Victor Vroom developed the expectancy theory.
  • See Learning Goal 6: Explain the key principles of goal-setting, expectancy, reinforcement, and equity theories.
  • See Learning Goal 6: Explain the key principles of goal-setting, expectancy, reinforcement, and equity theories.
  • See Learning Goal 6: Explain the key principles of goal-setting, expectancy, reinforcement, and equity theories.
  • See Learning Goal 6: Explain the key principles of goal-setting, expectancy, reinforcement, and equity theories.
  • See Learning Goal 6: Explain the key principles of goal-setting, expectancy, reinforcement, and equity theories.
  • See Learning Goal 7: Show how managers put motivation theories into action through such strategies as job enrichment, open communication, and job recognition. Herzberg argued factors such as responsibility, achievement and recognition were more important motivational factors in the long-run than pay. He believed that if you wanted to motivate employees you should focus on enriching the job.
  • See Learning Goal 7: Show how managers put motivation theories into action through such strategies as job enrichment, open communication, and job recognition.
  • See Learning Goal 7: Show how managers put motivation theories into action through such strategies as job enrichment, open communication, and job recognition.
  • See Learning Goal 7: Show how managers put motivation theories into action through such strategies as job enrichment, open communication, and job recognition.
  • See Learning Goal 7: Show how managers put motivation theories into action through such strategies as job enrichment, open communication, and job recognition.
  • See Learning Goal 7: Show how managers put motivation theories into action through such strategies as job enrichment, open communication, and job recognition. Remember rewarding performance can come in different formats than money. What are other ways to recognize good performance?
  • See Learning Goal 7: Show how managers put motivation theories into action through such strategies as job enrichment, open communication, and job recognition. High Performance Teams This slide presents characteristics of high performance teams. This list is compiled from the Wall Street Journal on high performance teams. Ask the students in teams to explore these characteristics as they relate to teams they have been on. Which of these characteristics apply to their team and which are lacking? What modifications do they need to make to move towards being a high performance team?
  • See Learning Goal 7: Show how managers put motivation theories into action through such strategies as job enrichment, open communication, and job recognition. What’s Good for You This slide offers simple tips for motivating employees in your business. A motto to remember is the Golden Rule: Treat others like you want to be treated. Ask the students where the recommendations in the slide fit in Maslow’s or Herzberg’s theories.
  • See Learning Goal 7: Show how managers put motivation theories into action through such strategies as job enrichment, open communication, and job recognition. What’s Bad for You This slide ties into the previous slide and offers tips on what to avoid in order to enhance employee morale. Ask students why these factors negatively impact employee morale.
  • See Learning Goal 8: Show how managers personalize motivation strategies to appeal to employees across the global and across generations. Managers must consider cultural differences, and they must also contend with employees in different age groups. To start a discussion ask students what issues they may encounter if they managed employees from Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y?
  • See Learning Goal 8: Show how managers personalize motivation strategies to appeal to employees across the global and across generations.
  • See Learning Goal 8: Show how managers personalize motivation strategies to appeal to employees across the global and across generations.
  • See Learning Goal 8: Show how managers personalize motivation strategies to appeal to employees across the global and across generations. The Best Companies for Workers This list is generated by Fortune Magazine . Ask students: What makes a company “employee friendly”? (Answers will vary) Use the Fortune research to profile one or all of the companies, so students can understand what programs these companies have implemented to enhance worker satisfaction.

Transcript

  • 1. * * Chapter Ten Motivating Employees McGraw-Hill/Irwin ©2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, All Rights Reserved
  • 2. SERGEY BRIN & LARRY PAGE Google * *
    • Founded Google in 1998 in a friend’s garage.
    • Their success is a result of constant innovation and motivating employees to pursue their own interests .
    Profile
    • Walls are painted in bright colors, offices are open and the Googleplex provides food and recreation activities for all employees.
    10-
  • 3. INTRINSIC REWARDS * *
    • Intrinsic Rewards -- Personal satisfaction felt for a job well done.
    • Kinds of Intrinsic Rewards:
    The Value of Motivation
      • Pride in your performance
      • Sense of achievement
    10-
  • 4. EXTRINSIC REWARDS * *
    • Extrinsic Rewards -- Something given as a recognition of good work.
    • Kinds of Extrinsic Rewards:
      • Pay Raises
      • Promotions
      • Awards
    The Value of Motivation 10-
  • 5. FRINGE BENEFITS Perks Offered to Employees at Top 50 Employers * * Source: Business Week, www.businessweek.com Recognizing a Job Well Done LG7 10-
  • 6. UPSET at UPS (Legal Briefcase) * *
    • UPS drivers work under strict rules and work requirements.
    • Performance pressure has taken a toll on drivers who report increased stress, anxiety and back pain.
    • UPS is employing new technologies and planning to increase productivity without overtaxing drivers.
    10-
  • 7. ARE YOU STRESSED? Warnings of Employee Stress * *
    • Negative attitudes about work
    • Drops in productivity
    • Chronic lateness
    • Absenteeism
    • Careless with details
    • Unable to work with others
    • Withdrawal from co-workers
    • Easily upset or angered
    Frederick Taylor: The Father of Scientific Management LG1 10-
  • 8. MASLOW’S THEORY of MOTIVATION * *
    • Hierarchy of Needs -- Theory of motivation based on unmet human needs from basic physiological needs to safety, social and esteem needs to self-actualization needs.
    • Needs that have already been met do not motivate.
    • If a need is filled, another higher-level need emerges.
    LG3 Motivation and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs 10-
  • 9. MASLOW’S HIERARCHY of NEEDS * * LG3 Motivation and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs 10-
  • 10. HERZBERG’S MOTIVATING FACTORS * *
    • Herzberg’s research centered on two questions:
    LG4 Herzberg’s Motivating Factors
      • What factors controlled by managers are most effective in increasing worker motivation?
      • How do workers rank job-related factors in order of importance related to motivation?
    10-
  • 11. JOB CONTENT * *
    • Herzberg found job content factors were most important to workers – workers like to feel they contribute to the company.
    • Motivators -- Job factors that cause employees to be productive and that give them satisfaction .
    LG4 Herzberg’s Motivating Factors 10-
  • 12. JOB ENVIRONMENT * *
    • Job environment factors maintained satisfaction but did not motivate employees.
    • Hygiene Factors -- Job factors that can cause dissatisfaction if missing but that do not necessarily motivate employees if increased .
    LG4 Herzberg’s Motivating Factors 10-
  • 13. HERZBERG’S MOTIVATORS and HYGIENE FACTORS * * LG4 Herzberg’s Motivating Factors 10- Motivators Hygiene Factors Work itself Company policy and administration Achievement Supervision Recognition Working conditions Responsibility Interpersonal relations Growth and advancement Salary, status and job security
  • 14. COMPARISON of the THEORIES of MASLOW and HERZBERG * * LG4 Herzberg’s Motivating Factors 10-
  • 15. GOAL-SETTING THEORY * *
    • Goal-Setting Theory -- Setting ambitious but attainable goals can motivate workers and improve performance if the goals are accepted, accompanied by feedback, and facilitated.
    LG6 Goal-Setting Theory and Management by Objectives 10-
  • 16. APPLYING GOAL-SETTING THEORY * *
    • Management by Objectives (MBO) -- Involves a cycle of discussion, review and evaluation of objectives among top and middle-level managers, supervisors and employees.
    • Managers formulate goals in cooperation with everyone.
    • Need to monitor results and reward achievement.
    LG6 Goal-Setting Theory and Management by Objectives 10-
  • 17. ORGANIZATIONS USING MBO * *
      • Toyota Motor Company
      • Emerson Electric Company
      • U.S. Department of Defense
    LG6 Goal-Setting Theory and Management by Objectives 10-
  • 18. EXPECTANCY THEORY in MOTIVATION * *
    • Expectancy Theory -- The amount of effort employees exert on a specific task depends on their expectations of the outcome.
    • Employees ask:
      • Can I accomplish the task?
      • What’s my reward?
      • Is the reward worth the effort?
      • Expectations can vary from person to person.
    LG6 Meeting Employee Expectations: Expectancy Theory 10-
  • 19. EXPECTANCY THEORY * * LG6 Meeting Employee Expectations: Expectancy Theory 10-
  • 20. NADLER & LAWLER’S MODIFICATION * *
    • Researchers Nadler and Lalwer modified expectancy theory and suggested five steps for managers:
      • Determine what rewards employees value.
      • Determine worker’s performance standard.
      • Make sure performance standards are attainable.
      • Tie rewards to performance.
      • Be sure employees feel rewards are adequate.
    LG6 Meeting Employee Expectations: Expectancy Theory 10-
  • 21. USING REINFORCEMENT THEORY * *
    • Reinforcement Theory -- Positive and negative reinforcers motivate a person to behave in certain ways.
    • Positive reinforcement includes praise, pay increases and recognition.
    • Negative reinforcement includes reprimands, reduced pay, and layoff or firing.
    • Extinction is a way of trying to stop behavior by not responding to it.
    LG6 Reinforcing Employee Performance: Reinforcement Theory 10-
  • 22. REINFORCEMENT THEORY * * LG6 Reinforcing Employee Performance: Reinforcement Theory 10-
  • 23. EQUITY THEORY * *
    • Equity Theory -- Employees try to maintain equity between inputs and outputs compared to others in similar positions.
    • Workers often base perception of their outcomes to a specific person or group.
    • Perceived inequities can lead to reduced quality and productivity, absenteeism even resignation.
    LG6 Treating Employees Fairly: Equity Theory 10-
  • 24. ENRICHING JOBS * *
    • Job Enrichment -- A motivational strategy that emphasizes motivating the worker through the job itself.
    LG7 Motivation Through Job Enrichment
    • Based on Herzberg’s motivators, such as responsibility, achievement and recognition.
    10-
  • 25. KEY CHARACTERISTICS of WORK * *
    • Skill Variety
    • Task Identity
    • Task Significance
    • Autonomy
    • Feedback
    LG7 Motivation Through Job Enrichment 10-
  • 26. TYPES of JOB ENRICHMENT * *
    • Job Enlargement -- A job enrichment strategy that involves combining a series of tasks into one challenging and interesting assignment.
    • Job Rotation -- A job enrichment strategy that involves moving employees from one job to another.
    LG7 Motivation Through Job Enrichment 10-
  • 27. USING OPEN COMMUNICATION * *
    • Create a culture that rewards listening.
    • Train managers to listen.
    • Use effective questioning techniques.
    • Remove barriers to open communication.
    • Ask employees what’s important to them.
    LG7 Motivating Through Open Communication 10-
  • 28. BIG MOTIVATORS for SMALL BUSINESS (Spotlight on Small Business) * *
    • Things like weekly trips to the movies and after-work parties help keep employees motivated.
    • Communication, mentoring and group bonding are key elements to success.
    • Open communication and increased responsibility for employees makes them feel a real part of the firm.
    10-
  • 29. RECOGNIZING GOOD WORK * *
    • Raises are not the only ways to recognize an employee’s performance. Recognition can also include:
      • Paid time off
      • Flexible scheduling
      • Work from home opportunities
      • Paid child or elder care
      • Stock options or profit sharing
      • Company awards
      • Company events or teams
    LG7 Recognizing a Job Well Done 10-
  • 30. WORK WELL with OTHERS Keys for Productive Teamwork * *
    • Have a common understanding of your task.
    • Clarify roles and responsibilities.
    • Set rules.
    • Get to know each other.
    • Communicate openly and often.
    Source: Wall Street Journal Research, September 2007. Recognizing a Job Well Done LG7 10-
  • 31. WHAT’S GOOD for YOU Most Positive Remedies for Employee Moral * * Recognizing a Job Well Done LG7 10-
  • 32. WHAT’S BAD for YOU Most Negative Actions for Employee Morale * * Recognizing a Job Well Done LG7 10-
  • 33. MOTIVATING ACROSS the GENERATIONS * *
    • Baby Boomers (1946 – 1964)
      • Experienced great economic prosperity, job security, optimism about their future.
    • Generation X (1965 – 1980)
      • Raised in dual-career families, attended day care, feeling of insecurity about jobs
      • Generation Y or Millenials (1980 – 2000)
      • Raised by indulgent parents, used to many comforts like computers and cell phones
    LG8 Motivating Employees Across Generations 10-
  • 34. GENERATION X in the WORKPLACE * *
    • Desire economic security but focus more on career security more than job security.
    • Good motivators as managers due to emphasis on results rather than work hours.
    • Tend to be flexible and good at collaboration and consensus building.
    • Very effective at giving employee feedback and praise.
    LG8 Motivating Employees Across Generations 10-
  • 35. MILLENIALS in the WORKPLACE * *
    • Tend to be impatient, skeptical, blunt and expressive.
    • Are tech-savvy and able to grasp new concepts.
    • Able to multi-task and are efficient.
    • Highlight a strong sense of commitment.
    • Place a high value on work-life balance.
    • Fun and stimulation are key job requirements.
    LG8 Motivating Employees Across Generations 10-
  • 36. The BEST COMPANIES for WORKERS * * Source: Fortune Magazine, www.fortune.com Motivating Employees Across Generations LG8 10- Company Location NetApp Sunnyvale, California Edward Jones St. Louis, Missouri Boston Consulting Group Boston, Massachusetts Google Mountain View, California Wegmans Food Markets Rochester, New York Cisco Systems San Jose, California