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America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011
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America's Tomorrow Press Coverage May-July 2011

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News coverage for "America's Tomorrow," the new PolicyLink multimedia series exploring race, changing demographic, and the nation's future.

News coverage for "America's Tomorrow," the new PolicyLink multimedia series exploring race, changing demographic, and the nation's future.

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  • 1. IN THE NEWSTable of ContentsEDITORIALS  ―America‘s Tomorrow: Equity in a Changing Nation.‖  ―Is Our Racial Gap Becoming a Generation Gap?NEWS COVERAGE (PRINT & BLOGS)  The Daily Beast ―The Browning of America  Salon ―When Whites Say ‗What About Me?‘‖  Colorlines ―Can You Picture America‘s Changing Demographics?‖  Daily Mail ―Changing Face of America.‖  SaludToday ―Interactive Map Shows Swell of Racial/Ethnic Diversity in the US.‖  The Colorado Independent ―America‘s Tomorrow‘ Map Underlines Folly of Colorado‘s Latino-Alienating GOP.‖  BET News ―People of Color Will Be New Majority.‖  AOL Black Voices ―The Future Looks Brown.‖  The Root ―Time-Lapse Map Shows America‘s Brown Future.‖  News One ―Group Predicts Minorities Will Become Majority By 2040.‖  BET News ―Census Reveals that Minorities are the Majority in the United States.‖  Colorlines ―More Than Half of U.S. Children Under Age 2 are of Color.‖  Oakland Local ―PolicyLink Talks Race and Class in a Changing World.‖  San Francisco Chronicle ―PolicyLink Talks Race and Class in a Changing World.‖  NY Amsterdam News ―Ignoring the Unemployed at Our Peril.‖RADIO  BBC Americana: Inside the USA  KQED Forum  Southern California Public Radio  American Urban Radio Network
  • 2. EDITORIALSAngela Glover BlackwellFounder and CEO, PolicyLinkAmericas Tomorrow: Equity In a Changing NationMay 27, 2011The face of America is changing.And the fate of America hinges on how we react to -- and invest in -- those changes.By 2042, a majority of Americans will be people of color. Already, California, Texas, Hawaii, New Mexico, and DC havemore people of color than whites. And today, nearly half of all children are kids of color.By definition, if they dont succeed, the nation wont succeed.There was a time not that long ago when we listened to the voices of tomorrow and invested in our national future. The GIBill, affirmative action, and strong unions all helped the "Greatest Generation" establish a potent and stable middle class --and gave their children tangible hope for the future.But we arent doing that any more.Many in the still-majority white population and political establishment dont see themselves reflected in the faces ofAmericas children. They are talking far more about slashing Medicaid and education funding than investing in the dreamsand needs of our children. Too many who have achieved success for themselves now want to pull up the ladder behindthem.The results are obvious -- people of color are disproportionately saddled with high poverty rates, failing schools, poorhealth, and under-invested communities.But these challenges dont only affect communities of color.White families that rely on the public education system struggle with these nationwide school budget squeezes. Whitecollege students are graduating with six-figure debt. White workers who need public transit to get to their jobs are hurt bythe lack of forward-thinking investment. And white entrepreneurs are having to spend money giving new hires the jobskills a strong public school system should provide. Thats no way to run a country.
  • 3. So, how should America run?The answer is equity -- just and fair inclusion.For a long time, this push for equity came draped in moral language -- "we must invest equitably because it is the rightthing to do." But economists and community leaders alike know that equity has become an economic imperative, as wellas a moral one.In the global economy, our remarkable diversity will be our calling card -- and it can be our most competitive asset. In adiverse and interconnected world, America could be the most connected of all. The breadth and depth of our talent couldonce again be unrivaled -- if we tap into the vast resource that is the next generation.For America to compete moving forward, we cant continue squandering the skills and potential of millions of young menand women.As a nation, we can see our future and it is captured in the hopes and dreams of a 5-year-old Latina girl and a 7-year-oldblack boy. Our success depends on theirs.
  • 4. Angela Glover BlackwellFounder and CEO, PolicyLinkIs Our Racial Gap Becoming a Generation Gap?July 14, 2011Since our founding, older Americans have sacrificed significantly to ensure that future generations grow up in a nationrich with promise and opportunity.But now, with talk of cutbacks to education, Medicaid, public transportation and critical infrastructure, many are renegingon this historical commitment, calling instead for the "opportunity ladder" to be pulled up entirely.What is the reason for this sudden divide?The answer may be nothing more complex, or disheartening, than Americas rapidly changing demographics.We know that by 2042, people of color will be the majority in America. Already nearly half (46.5 percent) of our nationsyoung people are of color, while more than 80 percent of seniors nationwide are white.It seems that this dramatic gap has transformed our nations unaddressed racial divide into a generational divide.For the first time, Americas seniors, business leaders, and elected officials simply do not see themselves in the faces oftodays young. For many, this signals less obligation and commitment to the kinds of programs and resources that wouldhelp provide a boost for the next generation.Were seeing this now with blocks and cuts to public education and sensible programs like Pell Grants, YouthBuild,Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), and the DREAM Act, all of which would provide Americasyouth with the tools and resources they need to compete and succeed in todays global economy.Its no wonder that the places where this divide is most pronounced -- like Arizona -- have become ground zero for racialtension and anti-immigrant sentiment, with older voters begrudgingly "protecting" their entitlements at the expense ofprograms that serve young people, particularly those in low-income areas and communities of color.And yet, this kind of stingy, self-interested policymaking hurts not just those who are African American, Latino, Asianand Native American but the future of all young people, including those who are white. The white urban-dwelling familythat wants to send a child to public school is faced with the consequences of under-investment. The young white workerseeking to rely on public transportation is disappointed. The impact of the racial divide extends beyond communities ofcolor.
  • 5. We cannot allow this to continue.Without targeted, meaningful investments in our public schools, higher education, workforce development, and jobcreation programs -- as well as in the infrastructure and public transportation that make access to each possible - we willall be left behind.Thankfully, new and innovative policies are underway which will help strengthen nation-wide efforts to buildcommunities of opportunity in which everyone can prosper. This week, the Obama Administration launched the StrongCities, Strong Communities initiative to foster local innovation and entrepreneurship in our nations cities. And earlier thismonth, it was announced that $30 million is now available to continue funding the federal Promise Neighborhoodsprogram, which would wrap poor children across the country in education, health, and social supports from the cradle-to-college-to-career.Programs like these will help lay the foundation for a truly equitable and sustainable future for our nation.But for us to cross the finish line, we must first see ourselves in the faces of Americas tomorrow.
  • 6. NEWS COVERAGE (PRINT AND BLOGS) mail ermalink18 May 2011The Browning Of AmericaA map of demographic change:
  • 7. THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011 09:01 ET When whites say, "What about me?" New research shows a big jump in white Americans saying they face racism. What are we missing here? BY JOAN WALSH Did you know whites believe they face more racism than African-Americans do? Thats what Ive been reading in the news lately. Two weeks ago, the Wall Street Journal ran a short piece about an intriguing study by researchers at Tufts and Harvard University, under the headline, "White Americans See Anti-White Bias on the Rise." Since then the New York Times weighed in with a fascinating "Room for Debate" discussion titled "Is Anti-White Bias a Problem?" TheRoot likewise posed the findings as a question, albeit more pointed: "White People Face the Worst Racism?" Wednesday Gothamist declared flatly: "Regarding Racism, Whites Think They Are the New Blacks." Whats going on here? Black unemployment is double the white rate, with black poverty on the rise and the mortgage crisis hitting African-Americans hardest of all; theres proof that lenders gave blacks higher-interest and subprime mortgages even when they had the same income and credit rating as whites. The drug war hits black people disproportionately. So how in Gods name can white people say they face worse racism? And who are these white people, anyway? Well, theyre 209 white people, to be precise, chosen to reflect census data in terms of age, education and gender, according to Harvard Business School professor Michael Norton, co-author (with Tufts Samuel Sommers) of the study titled "Whites see racism as a zero-sum game that they are now losing." Even if you think its plausible that whites are experiencing more anti-white bias in this rapidly diversifying country -- and I do, more on that later -- the results are stunning. Not only do the white respondents believe anti-white racism has risen enormously: On a scale of 1 to 10, whites gave anti-white racism a 4.7 over the last decade, up from 1.7 in the 1950s. They also seem to think its a bigger problem than anti-black racism, which they gave a 9.1 in the 50s but only a 3.6 in the 00s. (Blacks thought anti-white bias had risen slightly, from 1.4 to 1.8.)
  • 8. Norton points out that his study couldnt break down respondents by region, the rural-urban divide, by income or bypolitics, so its possible an over- or under-representation of a particular region, class or partisan sample might skew theresults a little. "Its clearly not perfect, but its as good as we could do," Norton says, noting that differences in educationand age didnt change the results. Which didnt hugely surprise him, Norton said, given the prominence of big affirmativeaction controversies, like the New Haven firefighter suit or the Seattle school desegregation conflict, in which whites haveclaimed disadvantage. "So it isnt as though it never happens," Norton says. But where those controversies make bigheadlines, "we dont look at disparities in child nutrition, or lead poisoning, or lots of other indicators" showing howAfrican-Americans are still disadvantaged.I wasnt surprised to learn whites think anti-white bias is on the rise, but that they think its a bigger problem than anti-black racism is shocking, and alarming. Is it possible that some whites might experience more anti-white "racism" nowthan they did 30 years ago? Well, not if youre trapped in the boundaries of discourse mostly defined in academia, wherepeople of all races can be bigots or prejudiced, but they can only be "racist" if they are a member of the socially,politically and economically dominant group. But in our kaleidoscopic multiracial society, "racism" is a term that, like itor not, has come to be used by every group, to cover slights ranging from a peer in one group not liking your group,someone consistently disrespecting your group, to actual discrimination in education and employment. The idea thatwhites cant face racism seems silly: In the San Francisco Bay Area, where we have leaders of every race, whitesdisproportionately hold political and economic power, although political power is more diffused. But your chances ofhaving a non-white teacher, boss, co-worker, firefighter, beat cop, prosecutor or judge are pretty high. Grievances can bemisunderstood as racial; they may in fact be racial.And in a society where whites will inevitably become a minority at some point in the next 40 years -- among Californiaschoolchildren, they already are -- will those complaints matter? Should they? Its hard to know exactly how to analyzeNortons data, because its mute on what respondents consider anti-white bias. Therefore its hard to know what, ifanything, to do. In its "Room for Debate" feature on the whites and racism study, the New York Times sought out VictoriaPlaut of the University of California-Berkeley Law School, whose research on whites attitudes toward diversity arefascinating. Given the lack of information about the experiences and social class of the people in Nortons study, its hardto know whether Plauts work has direct relevance, but its worth discussing nonetheless.Plauts research "What About Me? Perceptions of Exclusion and Whites Reactions to Multiculturalism," with co-authorsFlannery G. Garnett and Laura E. Buffardi, looked at five different studies designed to measure white and non-whiteattitudes toward multiculturalism and diversity programs. Plaut and her co-authors found, maybe not surprisingly, thatwhites tended to feel excluded by multiculturalism, where people of color felt included. But this reaction could belessened, or intensified, by a couple of variables. In one of the five studies, one group read a description ofmulticulturalism and diversity activities that made clear that the experiences of white Americans were part of the mix; acontrol group read an identical description, with no mention of white Americans. The whites who were told diversityapproaches included the experience of whites felt more "included" than those who were not. In another study, researcherslooked at subjects "need to belong" -- it has an acronym, NTB, who knew? -- and found that whites with a strong need tobelong felt particularly excluded by activities and approaches around multiculturalism and diversity.
  • 9. In an experiment known as "Me/Not Me," respondents were asked to quickly rate whether a series of terms having to dowith race, ethnicity and diversity had anything to do with them personally. It found that the white students related morefavorably to the terms associated with "colorblindness" -- equality, unity, sameness, similarity, color blind, and colorblindness – than to words associated with "multiculturalism": diversity, variety, culture, multicultural, multiracial,difference and multiculturalism.What does this tell us? The study authors (as do I) take for granted that it matters -- it would be a good thing -- if whitesembrace diversity and multicultural initiatives, whether in schools, workplaces and community groups, and they thereforesuggest that people designing such programs consider that "whites‘ reactions to multiculturalism … are rooted in the basicsocial psychological need for inclusion and belonging." Stressing that multiculturalism encompasses the wide variety ofwhite ethnic and class experiences might help. Emphasizing words with positive resonance like "equality" and "unity"might too.That makes sense to me. As long as Ive been writing about the changing demography of California, Ive wondered aboutrhetoric that seems to leave whites out of the future. Ive never been a huge fan of the "people of color" umbrella whenwielded politically. It can be useful descriptively; it can also provide (false) confidence that "minority" issues can gain"majority" support without whites, as long as African-American lawyers, Cuban teachers, Laotian refugees, Caribbeanentrepreneurs, Salvadoran doctors, fourth-generation Chinese real estate moguls, refugees from Mexican drug wars, andthird-generation welfare recipients of any non-white race can all stick together in a grand coalition. Good luck with that.Last week I sent around via Twitter a fascinating map produced by the group PolicyLink (disclosure, Im on the board),"Americas Tomorrow," which vividly shows the shifting demographic landscape between 1990 and 2040. (Ive embeddedit below.) The map shows how America is changing, and its a mind-blowing graphic tool. But its silent about what it allmeans. I think it means that every generation or two, Americans have to reinvent America, and weve never come up withan idea thats truly racially inclusive -- and were about to have to. But that vision has to include white people -- and notonly as the scared seniors Ross Douthat warns wont be able to trust brown kids, when its their turn to support them viaSocial Security and Medicare. I certainly dont think the map should be used as a way to scare white folks into investing inbrown kids -- or else.In all of these discussions, I find myself thinking we need more empathy. On that very point, Michael Norton began hisarticle with a startling quote from Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions, from the hearings on the nomination of Sonia Sotomayor tothe Supreme Court in 2009, which were racially divisive in a way they really didnt need to be. During discussions onjudicial "empathy," Sessions opined that "Empathy for one party is always prejudice against another." Really? What a sad,cynical worldview. Its as though empathy is finite, like money in your bank account or gas in your tank. Theres also theassumption that if non-white people get more power and influence, they‘ll wield it at the expense of white people, the way(many) white people did when the roles were reversed.I was raised to believe empathy was what made us human, and that its reciprocal: The capacity to stand in anothers shoesand feel for them is one of our great advantages. So I think weve got to try to understand why whites seem to believetheyre facing more bias than African-Americans, even if were inclined to roll our eyes and either hope its a researchproblem (which I did) or hold on until what whites believe doesnt matter so much anymore. I trust the next far-more-
  • 10. multiracial generation to feel for older and younger people, whatever their race. I believe that makes us not only human,but American -- and I think I have a lot of company in that belief.Heres the "Americas Tomorrow" map. Tell me what you think
  • 11. Can You Picture America’s Demographic Future?.by Asraa MustufaFriday, May 27 2011We‘ve reported on the country‘s changing demographics before. PolicyLink recently released atime-lapse map showingwhere people of color will become a majority in the U.S. over the next 30 years.By 2042, people of color will constitute the majority of our population. California, Texas, Hawaii, New Mexico, andWashington DC already have more people of color than whites. You can check out what counties and states will becomemajority non-white by decade, based on PolicyLink‘s projections. While these changes are expected to occur across thecountry, the map shows major concentrations of people of color projected for southern states.Last month, Think Progress released a map showing racial demographics by county today. They also featured someneat infographics highlighting major changes over the last decade based on Census data.PolicyLink is a research institute dedicated to advancing economic and social equity. Their CEO and founder AngelaGlover Blackwell said that the projections prove that the nation‘s success depends on the success of people of color, andthat equitable policies are increasingly becoming an economic imperative as well as a moral one.―Many in the still-majority white population and political establishment don‘t see themselves reflected in the faces ofAmerica‘s children. They are talking far more about slashing Medicaid and education funding than investing in thedreams and needs of our children,‖ she said. ―As a nation, we can see our future and it is captured in the hopes and dreamsof a 5-year-old Latina girl and a 7-year-old African American boy. Our success depends on theirs.‖
  • 12. The changing face of America: Time-lapse map reveals how non-whites will become the majority in U.S.within 30 yearsBy DAILY MAIL REPORTERLast updated at 2:52 PM on 27th May 2011By the year 2040, the majority of Americans will be people of colour - the minorities will have become the majority.A fascinating new time-lapse map shows the increase in the non-white population across the decades.It starts with 1990 and then predicts up to 2020, 2030 and 2040.The map, titled the Map of Americas Tomorrow, was produced by PolicyLink, a national research agency dedicated tosocial equity. It illustrates what theroot.com calls the decade-by-decade browning of America. It is said to be the firstvisual representation of its kind of the countrys racial future.The all-inclusive term is used to describe their growth of the populations of blacks, Hispanics/Latinos and Asians. AngelaGlover Blackwell, the Founder & CEO of PolicyLink, said: This map makes crystal clear just how dramatically the faceof America is changing – and how quickly.Already, nearly half of all young people are of color, and by 2040, people of color will become our nations majority.Melting pot: America can expect more and more integration, according to PolicyLinkClearly, this snapshot of our future has struck a chord, leaving no doubt that we must invest in and start building thefoundation of tomorrows America today. Lets start now.
  • 13. The map, however, is causing some controversy. One commenter said: What a joke! This does not compare populationdensity. This does not differentiate between Native Indians, Blacks, Mexicans, Chinese etc... etc... This is just some fewpeoples wild guess put out for what reason! This map appears to me to be a hate stimulator. Nothing more.Looking to the future: In the next ten years the trends will continue, with more non-white people domination populationsof U.S. countiesAnother commentator added: I am Chinese American and I objected to the grouping under Asian as coloured ... Chinese,Japanese and Koreans are not coloured. Our complexion is white if not whiter than caucasians.Miss Blackwell said: Today, nearly half of all children are kids of color.By definition, if they dont succeed, the nationwont succeed. Many in the still-majority white population and political establishment dont see themselves reflected inthe faces of Americas children. They are talking far more about slashing Medicaid and education funding than investingin the dreams and needs of our children.Too many who have achieved success for themselves now want to pull up the ladder behind them. The results are obvious- people of colour are disproportionately saddled with high poverty rates, failing schools, poor health, and under-investedcommunities.But these challenges dont only affect communities of colour.White families that rely on the public education system struggle with these nationwide school budget squeezes. Whitecollege students are graduating with six-figure debt. Thats no way to run a country.Two months ago new census maps and data was released showing the stark geographical divide between Americas blackand Hispanic populations as they become increasingly concentrated on opposite ends of the country.The U.S. black and Hispanic populations are mostly concentrated in the South - but whereas the black population iscentred in the Southeast, Hispanics are mostly in the Southwest.The biggest general population rises were in the Southwest and Southeast, but the largest falls came in the Midwest,according to 2010 Census Bureau data.Although Hispanics are concentrated in the Southwest, other areas of the South such as Alabama have posted significantgains in Hispanic population share.In many South states, the Hispanic population has doubled on ten years ago, with Hispanics outstripping whites for thefirst time in New Mexico - 46 to 40 per cent.The Census 2010 statistics showed the number of Hispanics in the U.S. reached 50million in 2010, with one in every sixAmericans now a Latino. They now represent 16 per cent of the U.S. population of 309million. Minority groups werebehind an unprecedented 90 per cent of total U.S. population growth since 2000, due to immigration and higher Latinobirth rates.
  • 14. May 19, 2011Interactive Map Shows Swell of Racial/Ethnic Diversity in U.S.This decade, the majority of youths will be people of color. By 2042, the nation will be a majority people of color. FromSouthern California to rural Iowa, every corner of America is seeing these changes.What does this interactive map (a still shown below) say about the future of America?Go to the EquityBlog to add your thoughts.  Share/SaveTags: America, diversity, EquityBlog, minority, people of color, PolicyLink, population growth
  • 15. America’s Tomorrow map underlines folly of Colorado’s Latino-alienating GOPBy John Tomasic | 05.19.11 | 4:35 pmShareDuring the Colorado legislative session just passed and during the midterm elections last year, state Republicansembraced Arizona-style anti-illegal immigration policy proposals and harsh rhetoric that alienated Coloradans,including non-white Republican politicians and supporters and, perhaps most dramatically, Latino Republicans.Analysts called that kind of politics a sort of longterm suicide missiongiven the shifting demographics of the state. Aninternet map of the country put out today by PolicyLink brings the point home. In the decades visualized by the map–1990 to 2040– the population of the American southwest, including Colorado, transforms.America’s Tomorrow from PolicyLinkColorado lawmakers failed to complete a congressional redistricting map this session. The courts now have to draw thelines. If the PolicyLink ―America‘s Tomorrow‖ map is accurate– and there‘s no reason to believe it‘s not– Colorado semi-swing districts 3 and 4 will see dramatic demographic change in the next two decades and beyond. If GOP politics don‘tsignificantly evolve soon, those districts, even as they‘re drawn right now, will be the Democrats‘ to lose.
  • 16. People of Color Will Be the New MajorityA PolicyLink map shows that by 2042, the nation will be more colorful.By Danielle WrightPosted: 05/23/2011 12:15 PM EDTBy 2042, people of color will be the new majority, according to a new interactive map from PolicyLink, a nationalresearch and advocacy institute.The map shows the growth of people of color in America from 1990 to 2040. It is the first installment of a newmultimedia series called America’s Tomorrow: Equity in a Changing Nation. The series will highlight America‘s old andnew demographics and the people who are addressing the change.One of those pioneers is Geoff Canada, president and chief executive officer for Harlem Childrens Zone in Harlem, NewYork. HCZ serves minority children from birth—with a program called Baby College, a series of workshops for parentsof children up to the age of three—to high school. Canada used the map as a centerpiece for a talk he gave in Londonentitled ―How to End Poverty.‖The majority of areas with populations of more than 50 percent people of color are in the Southwest, according to themap.(Photo: PolicyLink)
  • 17. The Future Looks BrownBy Trymaine Lee on May 24th 2011 2:41PMA recently released time-lapse map produced by PolicyLink, a national research agency dedicated to social equity, showsthe decade-by-decade browning of America. The so-called Map of Americas Tomorrow, shows that by the year 2042 themajority of Americans will be people of color. The map also shows the states and regions that will be most populated bypeople of color, including blacks, Hispanics/Latinos and Asians."This map makes crystal clear just how dramatically the face of America is changing – and how quickly," said AngelaGlover Blackwell, the Founder & CEO of PolicyLink. "Already, nearly half of all young people are of color, and by2040, people of color will become our nations majority. Clearly, this snapshot of our future has struck a chord, leaving nodoubt that we must invest in and start building the foundation of tomorrows America today. Lets start now."The "we" that Blackwell is referring to are those who influence policy, such as legislators and policymakers, according toPolicyLink. The group believes that the entire nation must take up the cause of advocacy on behalf of communities ofcolor, particularly for "fair, equitable and targeted investments."According to the latest U.S. Census data, a growing list of major American cities have seen their native-born blackpopulations declining at an alarming rate - including Detroit, New Orleans and Washington, D.C., and among the biggestlosers Oakland and Chicago with losses of 25 percent and 17 percent, respectively - over the past 10 years.Many upwardly mobile African Americans have moved to the suburbs or to the South. Others still have been forced out ofmajor cities by gentrification. Despite the shifts though, experts and data indicate that the overall number of ethnicminorities, including blacks, will in total comprise the majority of America in the relatively near future.PolicyLink said until now there has been no visualization of what this future will look like.
  • 18. Time-Lapse Map Shows Americas Brown FutureBy: Jenée Desmond-Harris | Posted: May 25, 2011"Map of Americas Tomorrow" (PolicyLink)Its no huge secret that by that by the year 2042, the majority of Americans will be people of color. Despite the fact thatmany African Americans have moved out of major cities to the suburbs, experts and data indicate that the overall numberof ethnic minorities, including blacks, will in total comprise the majority of America in the relatively near future.A recently released time-lapse map produced by PolicyLink, a national research agency dedicated to social equity,provides a visual of this decade-by-decade "browning" of America. The "Map of Americas Tomorrow" also shows thestates and regions that will be most populated by people of color, including blacks, Hispanics/Latinos and Asians."This map makes crystal clear just how dramatically the face of America is changing -- and how quickly," Angela GloverBlackwell, the Founder & CEO of PolicyLink told AOL Black Voices. "Already, nearly half of all young people are ofcolor, and by 2040, people of color will become our nations majority. Clearly, this snapshot of our future has struck achord, leaving no doubt that we must invest in and start building the foundation of tomorrows America today. Lets startnow."This is being called the first visual representation of its kind of the countrys racial future. Check out the time-lapse mapbelow or at PolicyLink.
  • 19. Group Predicts That Minorities Will Become Majority By 2040Written by NewsOne Staff on May 25, 2011PolicyLink, a research group is predicting that the Black, Hispanic/Latino and Asian populations will exceed that ofwhites in America by 2040.VIDEO:―Already, nearly half of all young people are of color, and by 2040, people of color will become our nation‘s majority.
  • 20. Minority Babies Are the New MajorityCensus shows there are also more Black households headed by women than by Black married couples.By Frank McCoyPosted: 06/23/2011 07:31 AM EDTFiled Under censusIt was inevitable, but some people are still going to be shocked.The Associated Press reports that for the first time in modern United States history minorities make up a majority of thenation‘s babies. This reality is a combination of a burgeoning Hispanic population, continued growth among Blacks andAsian-Americans, intermarriage and immigration by people of color from around the planet.Racial and ethnic minorities will be the U.S. majority by midcentury. And according to PolicyLink, by 2042, peopleof color will be the new majority.New census data also reveals that more Black children are likely to be raised without a father present in their lives, asthere are now more Black households headed by women, most of whom are single mothers, than there are African-American households with married couples.Politicians, demographers and businesspeople will take note as the impact of greater numbers of minority children willtransform economic and government policies, as well as commercial opportunites, as the percentage of white olderAmericans declines.
  • 21. More Than Half of U.S. Children Under Age 2 Are Of Colorby Jorge RivasFriday, June 24 2011New census data reports that more than half of the children under age 2 in the U.S. are of color. The data is just one moresign that the country is growing more diverse, which is a cite of both excitement and anxiety for some lawmakers.The findings also reinforce the prediction that by 2042, the majority of Americans will be people of color. Already,California, Texas, Hawaii, New Mexico, and DC have more people of color than whites.Last month, PolicyLink, a national research and advocacy institute, released ―The Map of America‘s Tomorrow,‖ a time-lapse map showing the growth of people of color in the United States from 1990 through 2040.Founder and CEO of PolicyLink, Angela Glover Blackwell says the fate of America hinges on how we react to — andinvest in — those changes.―In the global economy, our remarkable diversity will be our calling card- and it can be our most competitive asset,‖ shewrites in a blog post. ―In a diverse and interconnected world, America could be the most connected of all. The breadth anddepth of our talent could once again be unrivaled - if we tap into the vast resource that is the next generation.‖Blackwell says to get to the connected country she speaks of, equity is the answer. ―Just and fair inclusion.‖ For everyone.
  • 22. PolicyLink talks race and class in a changing world (VIDEO)Susan Mernit Mon, 27 Jun at 11:34pmManuel Pastor, director of the Program for Environmental and Regional EquityBy Oakland Editorial TeamIn this first video of the "Americas Tomorrow" series, PolicyLink Founder and CEO Angela Glover Blackwell interviewsManuel Pastor - director of the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity at the University of Southern California.In the interview Pastor – who is also professor of Geography and American Studies and Ethnicity at USC, and co-authorwith Blackwell and Stewart Kwoh of"Uncommon Common Ground: Race and Americas Future – sheds light on recentU.S. demographic changes and their impact on our nations future.This is part of a PolicyLink series on equity in a changing nation.
  • 23. PolicyLink talks race and class in a changing world (with VIDEO)In the first video of the "Americas Tomorrow" series, PolicyLink Founder and CEO Angela Glover Blackwell interviewsManuel Pastor, director of the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity at the University of Southern California.In the interview, Pastor -- who is also professor of Geography and American Studies and Ethnicity at USC, and co-authorwith Blackwell and Stewart Kwoh of Uncommon Common Ground: Race and Americas Future -- sheds light on recentU.S. demographic changes and their impact on our nations future.This is part of a PolicyLink series on equity in a changing nation.
  • 24. Ignoring the Unemployed at Our PerilBy David R. JonesThe ―jobless recovery‖ must seem like a sick joke for the 14 million Americans who are out of work. But it didn‘t reallyhit home to us just how bad the situation is until the Community Service Society‘s annual survey, ―The Unheard Third,‖revealed last year that two-thirds of unemployed, low-income New Yorkers surveyed reported being out of work for morethan a year, with 31 percent jobless for three years or more.How do families survive when workers have been unemployed for that long? To make matters worse, there are signs of agrowing reluctance on the part of employers to hire the long term unemployed. Perhaps this is because they have awealth of people scrambling for jobs. But what are the prospects for these Americans? What are we doing to ensure thata generation of workers is not permanently left behind?Focus Is on the DeficitThe response from our political leaders: They meet practically every day now to debate the ways to reduce the deficit.The fact of massive unemployment – the jobs deficit - has not engaged these officials. Thus the problems of the economyhave been defined in terms of the deficit, not the millions of jobless. Here are some reasons why this may be so.The high unemployment rate has not affected the stock market or business profits, which are booming. There may also bea generational gap that is becoming a racial gap: while nearly half of the nation‘s young people are of color, more than 80percent of seniors are white. As Angela Glover Blackwell wrote in ―America‘s Tomorrow‖ in PolicyLink: ―For the firsttime, America‘s seniors, business leaders, and elected officials simply do not see themselves in the faces of today‘syoung.‖It may be the case that unemployment is seen as primarily affecting people of color and the less educated, groups that lackpolitical clout. This is certainly true in New York City. Among low-income workers, job losses are particularly steepamong black New Yorkers. In the past year, 22 percent of low-income black households lost a job, compared to 17percent of low-income white households. Also low-income blacks are almost twice as likely as low-income whites tohave experienced long stretches of unemployment. In 2009, only 9 percent of low-income blacks reported long stretchesof unemployment. That figure expanded to 16 percent a year later.The effects of long-term joblessness have begun to set in among low-income New Yorkers. Among the unemployed inthe CSS survey, 76 percent of moderate and higher-income respondents thought that they could find a new job within ayear, compared to 55 percent of low-income respondents. But almost onethird of low-income respondents could not evenguess how long it will take to find a job. Much of the mainstream media has bought the arguments of those who say weshould cut public spending and relax government regulations on business as the answer to the problem of unemployment.Historically, this has not been true. Cutting spending didn‘t work for Herbert Hoover. In 1932, in the depths of the GreatDepression, Franklin D. Roosevelt ran for president on a platform espousing a balanced budget. But when he was elected,he gave up this idea and turned to government programs that put people to work, like the Works Progress Administrationthat employed millions of unskilled workers to carry out public works projects, including the construction of publicbuildings and roads. Almost every community in the United States has a park, bridge, or school constructed by thisagency.
  • 25. Need to Be ProactiveIf the federal government took a more proactive stance, certain job creation proposals could significantly lowerunemployment, including investing in transitional jobs programs such as the overhaul of our infrastructure and in energyrelated industries as well as easing credit for the expansion of small businesses. Even President Obama‘s fiscal stimulus,as one sided as it was – mostly tax relief, less on spending – was effective in creating and saving jobs.Public-private partnerships may be part of the answer to creating jobs. A recent bill was introduced in the U.S. Senate tocreate an American Infrastructure Financing Authority that would provide private capital investment in infrastructure –but with accountability and limited government liability. And it would be owned by the taxpayers, not privateshareholders. Ideas like an infrastructure bank could provide one way to get around the political stalemate that now existsin Washington over what to do about the economy.New York City could do something about this problem. The Human Resources Administration‘s Back to Work program– where almost all young applicants are sent to qualify for aid - is not a suitable option for most young people, many ofwhom have not yet held a job. HRA should use this opportunity to reconnect these youth to educational services and jobtraining. The city should also be tamping down critical flashpoints. We have a chronically jobless group – young men ofcolor – who are indiscriminately and in huge numbers the target of police stop and frisk tactics that have more bearing onrepression than on fighting crime.Also, the mayor simply ignored the fact that city summer jobs fell from 52,000 to 28,000 this year. He could have calledin help from his generous donor list – no one in the city has a longer list – but he did nothing. It simply wasn‘t importantto him. By ignoring the millions of the unemployed, public officials are helping to create a vast underclass of the joblessfor years to come, with all of the economic and social problems that would accompany it. We should be defining jobcreation as no less than crucial for the economic security of the nation.____________________________________________________________________David R. Jones is president and CEO of the Community Service Society (CSS), the leading voice on behalf of low-income New Yorkers for over 168 years. The views expressed in this column are solely those of the writer. TheUrban Agenda is available on CSS’s website: www.cssny.org.
  • 26. RADIO“Immigration Debate”BBC Americana: Inside the USAJune 5, 2011PolicyLink Founder and CEO Angela Glover Blackwell discusses race, changing demographics, and America‘s future."Oaklands Black Flight"KQED ForumJuly 7, 2011PolicyLink Founder & CEO Angela Glover Blackwell discusses the decline of African American populationsin Oakland, CA and major cities across the country in this hour-long interview also featuring Urban Habitat President andCEO Allen-Fernandez Smith, and Malo Hutson, assistant professor of city and regional planning at UC Berkeley."The Nations Growing Ethnic-Generational Divide, Illustrated."Southern California Public RadioJuly 19, 2011The third installment of the new PolicyLink multi-media series "Americas Tomorrow: Equity in a Changing Nation" ishighlighted, accompanied by an interactive chart illustrating Americas growing racial and generational divide.“Minorities Become the Majority.”American Urban Radio NetworkJuly 26, 2011PolicyLink Founder and CEO Angela Glover Blackwell discusses America‘s widening racial wealth gap and other issuesas explored in the ‖America‘s Tomorrow‖ series. With an estimated 20 million listeners, AURN is the largest networkreaching urban America.

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