DesignThinking for Educators   Version One | April 2011
Use your classroom space in          different ways?          Support healthy habits inside and          outside your scho...
This toolkit can help you        This toolkit offers you new                                                   create solu...
Guide
DT for Ed | Guide | p. 2ContentsGuide DT for Ed | Guide | p. 3                                          It’s Experimental....
DT for Ed | Guide | p. 3                                          It’s Experimental. Design           In short, Design Thi...
DT for Ed | Guide | p. 4                                                        The design process is what            It’s...
DT for Ed | Guide | p. 5                        The design process may           The design process therefore             ...
DT for Ed | Guide | p. 6                                   current students in the year      Over the course of the follow...
DT for Ed | Guide | p. 7                            In 2010, the faculty at River-    After several experiments           ...
Guia Design Thinking
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Guia Design Thinking

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Guia Design Thinking

  1. 1. DesignThinking for Educators Version One | April 2011
  2. 2. Use your classroom space in different ways? Support healthy habits inside and outside your school?Are You Connect more effectivelyLooking with parents?To...? Find new ways to teach old content? Recruit the best teachers to your school? Develop better systems of feedback between teachers? Re-envision arrival and departure procedures at your school? Then you’re in the right place.
  3. 3. This toolkit can help you This toolkit offers you new create solutions for every- ways to be intentional and day challenges. collaborative when you are designing. It hones your It equips you with the pro- skills and empowers you to cess and methods of design. create desirable solutions. Businesses, social entrepre- neurs and other innovators This is an invitation toThis is a have used them for decades to create solutions for many different types of challenges. experiment with the design process. Let it inspire you to approach challenges differ-Toolkit. In this toolkit, these methods are adapted specifically for ently and experience how Design Thinking adds a newFor You. educators, because as an edu- perspective to your work. cator, you design every day. You design your classroom, you design curriculum, you design learning environments for your students, and you design experiences and inter- actions for your colleagues.Having a process that In some ways, I have Design Thinking has I used to be quick tobrings people together always had elements made me look at our impose restrictionsto create more and of Design Thinking in curriculum in a whole on myself. I couldbetter ideas has been the way that I have new way. Incorporating easily convince myselfvery valuable for us. worked and thought Design Thinking with why a project wouldn’t about schools, but I Grant Wiggins’ Under- work before ever giv-Karen, have had no real pro- standing by Design, ing it a chance. SinceLearning Specialist cess to validate some I can research deeper, I have been exposed of my ideas. I was come up with more to Design Thinking, looking for approaches ideas and prototype I have made a stron- that combined the lessons. I have also ger effort to explore logical rigor of study started to collect ideas. My students in a traditional dis- feedback as inspira- have become part of cipline with a more tion to come up with my research team. The open and creative new lessons or to feedback they provide approach to thinking. adapt a lesson plan has helped me create Design Thinking offers for the next time. lessons that are more a way of problem student-centered. solving that is more Michael, integrative of differ- 2nd Grade Teacher Patrick, ent modes of thought. 3rd Grade Teacher It validates some of the things that teach- ers already do, but also gives the oppor- tunity to revisit one’s practice. Dominic, Head of School
  4. 4. Guide
  5. 5. DT for Ed | Guide | p. 2ContentsGuide DT for Ed | Guide | p. 3 It’s Experimental. Design In short, Design Thinking DT for Ed | Guide | p. 4 The design process is what It’s a deeply human approach DT for Ed | Guide | p. 5 The design process may The design process therefore DT for Ed | Guide | p. 6 current students in the year Over the course of the follow- Thinking creates a real space is the confidence that new, puts Design Thinking into that relies on your ability seem very straightforward integrates various modes 2060. They imagined what ing school year, the teachers to try something new. It better things are possible action. It’s a structured to be intuitive, to interpret at first glance, but there is of working: some steps are these people had done in tested many ideas in their gives you permission to fail and that you can make them approach to generating and what you observe and to one important aspect to more reflective, others are their lives and careers. As a classes. One teacher devel- and to learn from your mis- happen. And that kind of evolving ideas. Its five phases develop ideas that are emo- understand: its real value hands-on, and some encour- group, the teachers then cap- oped new communications takes, because you come up optimism is well-needed in help navigate the develop- tionally meaningful to those lies in the mix of tangible age interactions with people tured the most interesting for parents. The technology with new ideas, get feedback education. ment from identifying a you are designing for—all problem solving and abstract outside of your team. To help themes and worked back- team built new tools to sup- on them, then iterate. Given design challenge to finding skills you are well versed in thinking. The very concrete you know what to expect, ward to understand the skills port teachers in Investigative What is Design the range of needs your students have, your work will never be finished or “solved.” Classrooms and schools across the world are facing design challenges every The Design and building a solution. as an educator. One Thing observations of the first phase are abstracted as you define themes and insights. the following indicators will guide you through the meth- ods in the Toolkit section: Case Study these people would have needed to develop as chil- dren to be successful. Armed Learning. Another teacher even received a grant to reno- vate a classroom and create Thinking? It is always in progress. Yet there is an underlying expec- single day, from integrating technology to increasing par- Process to Keep Only after you have devel- oped a sense of meaning Reflective Ormondale with this inspiration from their own experiences, the a different learning environ- ment for her students. They in Mind Elementary tation that educators must ent involvement to improving and direction do you develop Hands-On group then went to visit out- didn’t go it alone: to build Design Thinking is a mindset. It’s Human-Centered. strive for perfection, that daily schedules. Wherever tangible solutions. What side organizations that were a network of learning and Design Thinking begins by they may not make mistakes, they fall on the spectrum of Phases may seem like a detour in Interaction facing analogous challenges. support, the staff dedicated School Thinking like a designer can understanding the needs that they should always be scale, the challenges educa- idea development ultimately Through interpreting all this time in their weekly meetings transform the way you and motivations of people— flawless role models. This tors are confronted with are makes your solutions much This design process can be information, the participants to discuss what was happen- approach the world when in this case, the students, kind of expectation makes it real, complex and varied. As more meaningful. applied in many forms. The came up with many genera- ing, learn from each other, imagining and creating new teachers, parents, staff and hard to take risks. It limits the such, they require new per- following pages contain a tive questions, such as “how and help each other through solutions for the future: administrators who make possibilities to create more spectives, new tools, and new discovery interpretation ideation experimentation evolution It requires taking a step back variety of examples of how might we enable the globally rough patches. it’s about being aware of up your everyday world. You radical change. But educa- approaches. Design Thinking to reflect, analyze, evaluate, it has been used to create aware student?” and “how the world around you, talk with these people, you tors need to experiment, too, is one of them. think again and then evolve. new, relevant solutions in an might we provide opportuni- In their second year, the believing that you play a role listen to them, you consider and Design Thinking is all This takes time—a scarce educational context. ties for interest-driven learn- group got back together in shaping that world, and how best to help them do about learning by doing. resource—and can be chal- ing?” The brainstorms that for a second workshop to taking action toward a more good work. Design Think- lenging, as educators are followed started with ideas make sense of all the experi- desirable future. Design ing begins from this place of It’s Optimistic. Design I have a challenge. I learned something. I see an opportunity. I have an idea. I tried something new. used to solving problems on about tools and classroom ments they had conducted How do I approach it? How do I interpret it? What do I create? How do I build it? How do I evolve it? Thinking gives you faith in deep empathy and builds on Thinking is the fundamental the spot in their classrooms. design and expanded out around the school. During your creative abilities and the power of these empa- belief that we all can create Discovery builds a solid Interpretation transforms Ideation means generat- Experimentation brings Evolution is the develop- But there are no shortcuts. to include curriculum and this session, they shared and The more abstract a process to take action thetic questions and insights. change—no matter how foundation for your ideas. your stories into mean- ing lots of ideas. Brain- your ideas to life. Building ment of your concept steps often feel The small, sometimes hidden, the educational system as a discussed their experiences, through when faced with a big a problem, how little time Creating meaningful ingful insights. Observa- storming encourages you prototypes means making over time. It involves plan- more intense, details often hold the keys to whole. Through prototyping created a typology of Investi- solutions for students, par- tions, field visits, or just a to think expansively ideas tangible, learning ning next steps, communi- difficult challenge. It’s Collaborative. Design or how small a budget. No but pay off in solving complex challenges. several of these ideas, the gative Learning methods, ents, teachers, colleagues simple conversation can and without constraints. while building them, and cating the idea to people the long run. how might Thinking requires conver- matter what constraints and administrators be great inspiration—but It’s often the wildest ideas sharing them with other who can help you realize When the teachers and teachers saw a set of similar and developed a framework sation, critique and all-out exist around you, designing begins with a deep under- finding meaning in that that spark visionary people. Even with early it, and documenting the administrators at Ormondale patterns emerge across all for Investigative Learning we create can be an enjoyable process. standing for their needs. ABSTrACT standards and assessments. teamwork. And that’s some- and turning it into action- thoughts. With careful and rough prototypes, process. Change often elementary, a public K-3 their prototypes: they were Discovery means opening able opportunities for preparation and a clear you can receive a direct happens over time, and thing that might be a bit of school in California, wanted all passionate about a teach- a shift, because despite up to new opportunities, and getting inspired to design is not an easy task. It involves storytelling, set of rules, a brainstorm session can yield hun- response and learn how to further improve and reminders of even subtle signs of progress are a 21st century to find ways to bring 21st ing and learning approach Today, the faculty at Ormon- the fact that educators are that they called Investiga- dale elementary School are learning expe- create new ideas. With the as well as sorting and dreds of fresh ideas. refine an idea. important. century skills into their surrounded by people all right preparation, this can condensing thoughts until classrooms, they knew the tive Learning. This approach continuing to evolve their rience for day long, teaching remains be eye-opening and will you’ve found a compelling would address students not approach to Investigative challenge would take time give you a good under- point of view and clear an often solitary profession. and long-term commitment. as receivers of information, Learning. As new teachers our students? standing of your design direction for ideation. Still, addressing complex (or challenge. They chose a year-long time- but as shapers of knowledge. join the school, other faculty even not-so-complex) chal- frame and used the design At the end of the workshop, help them understand how lenges benefits significantly process to get started. the teachers planned and to construct these experi- from the views of multiple Find videos about committed to experiments ences, and they have created perspectives, and others’ cre- Investigative Learning During the summer, the based on this philosophy that a “Manual of Investigative at Ormondale at ativity bolstering your own. pvsd.net. teachers kicked off the proj- they could conduct in their Learning” to keep track of ect with a two-day Design classrooms. their philosophy and meth- Thinking workshop. The ods. They have gained sup- Discovery phase began with port from their school board, CONCreTe an activity that asked them and have become recognized to develop empathy for a as a “California Distinguished learner in the 21st century: School.” the exercise entailed teach- dIsCOvEry IntErprEtatIOn IdEatIOn ExpErImEntatIOn EvOlutIOn ers imagining one of their3 4 5 6 DT for Ed | Guide | p. 7 In 2010, the faculty at river- After several experiments DT for Ed | Guide | p. 8 They turned to Design teachers] and the players DT for Ed | Guide | p. 9 enough theory—it’s time It’s Version One: this is not a dale Country School, an inde- with a few different collabo- Thinking to develop a game [kids] had different needs to take action. The Toolkit finished piece, it’s a foundation. pendent K-12 school in New ration tools, the riverdale and combined it with the and understood different provides you with instructions The Toolkit will evolve and York, embarked on a design teachers now have an online Backwards Design method- things. But the game actually to explore Design Thinking change based on your feed- project to encourage more platform for sharing lesson ology, which begins with had to meet all these needs yourself. back. That’s why we want to collaboration among teach- plans and activities as well the end goal in mind, to cre- simultaneously.” hear from you. Please send ers. With three teachers lead- as creating meeting agendas ate the educational content. us comments, stories, photos ing the process as facilita- to save time. “It seems to Using Backwards Design, Since launching, Motion Math or movies of your experiences Case Study tors, a group of 15 worked as a design team to take on the challenge. They started with be working for us. We’re shar- ing more as a team and we’ve freed up time to get more Case Study they were able to hone in on how they could assess students’ mastery of con- has been on the “Top 5” list of educational apps, was fea- tured in the Wall Street Jour- This is a Work using this toolkit to create new design solutions: DT_ed@ideo.com Riverdale observations and conversa- tions—not just in their own done in our meetings,” said one of the team members. Motion Math cepts and work from there to help them get the concepts nal, and won an excellence in Design Award from Children’s in Progress. Country School school, but also with analo- right. Using Design Thinking, Technology Review. Most gous environments. Splitting And there’s still a lot more they were able to create rewarding for Adauto and Collaborative into three teams, they inter- happening: teachers at a game that was fun, engag- Klein was the fact that insti- development of this toolkit, February- viewed employees at Sirius riverdale were so energized ing and valued by parents, tutional school purchases April 2011. XM, Consumer reports and by Design Thinking that they teachers and students alike. have been very strong. IDeO—organizations that submitted ideas for several “The most important part of Teachers have emailed them were noted for their team- design projects. In early merging the two processes videos of kids playing their work and collaboration. One 2011, they assembled a was iteration, being open to game in the classrooms, of the teacher-facilitators core team of five teachers to really listening to what people and students from preschool noted that this inspiration conduct a one-year project want,” observed Adauto. through community college was important to the team: to revise the school’s pro- are using the game to learn “It was really provocative. gram in character, conduct, Adauto and Klein started math skills. The founders are Discovery We saw that people have very and ethics. Another team of the process by defining a currently building on their different ways of managing teachers is helping to design challenge to create a game success and designing addi- their time and we developed a smooth transition for the that would address the tional educational games a new awareness [of these new head of the elementary biggest stumbling block for to address other hurdles in how might companies].” school. Teachers are using elementary school kids. They elementary education. It was the prototyp- Design Thinking in their went out to talk to teachers. we create a ing and feedback that made me really see Bringing this inspiration classrooms and are sharing how might we When the founders of Motion Over and over, they heard develop games back on-site, the team dis- their enthusiasm and ideas that fractions were a huge Interpretation the value in this pro- Math got together to think culture of col- Read more about cess. We have become cussed their learnings and with their colleagues. The about how to use games pain point. Next, they looked Motion Math at a more effective team laboration? that now shares ideas, resources and feedback clustered them into three themes: online tools, faculty impact has expanded way beyond the initial design proj- to tackle the to help kids learn, they knew that teaching math and for inspiration from the most popular games at the time, motionmathgames.com. on a regular basis. spaces and team-building ect and continues to spread. toughest learn- designing a product weren’t one of which had a bouncing activities. They identified device to move a character ing hurdles? Michael, the same thing. Both teach- 1st Grade Teacher opportunities for design ers who worked with ele- around a screen. From there, within these areas, and brain- mentary-school-aged kids, the team started brainstorm- Ideation stormed dozens of ideas. In Gabriel Adauto and Jacob ing, and generated lots of smaller groups, they built dif- Klein began their project with ideas for interactive games ferent prototypes, including an understanding of both that could help kids learn an online collaboration tool what kids liked and what par- fractions. Many prototypes to make faculty meetings ents and teachers valued— and feedback sessions later, more effective, a new faculty but they also recognized that Adauto and Klein launched lounge, and potluck brunches their experience and intuition Motion Math. “We did lots to bring teachers together in alone weren’t enough to of feedback sessions with Experimentation casual settings. design a successful learning paper prototypes. The most product. valuable feedback session we had was with parents, teachers and kids all together. We saw how the groups inter- act, and it helped us realize that the payers [parents and Evolution7 8 9
  6. 6. DT for Ed | Guide | p. 3 It’s Experimental. Design In short, Design Thinking Thinking creates a real space is the confidence that new, to try something new. It better things are possible gives you permission to fail and that you can make them and to learn from your mis- happen. And that kind of takes, because you come up optimism is well-needed in with new ideas, get feedback education. on them, then iterate. GivenWhat is Design the range of needs your students have, your work will never be finished or “solved.” Classrooms and schools across the world are facing design challenges everyThinking? It is always in progress. Yet there is an underlying expec- tation that educators must single day, from integrating technology to increasing par- ent involvement to improvingDesign Thinking is a mindset. It’s Human-Centered. strive for perfection, that daily schedules. Wherever Design Thinking begins by they may not make mistakes, they fall on the spectrum ofThinking like a designer can understanding the needs that they should always be scale, the challenges educa-transform the way you and motivations of people— flawless role models. This tors are confronted with areapproach the world when in this case, the students, kind of expectation makes it real, complex and varied. Asimagining and creating new teachers, parents, staff and hard to take risks. It limits the such, they require new per-solutions for the future: administrators who make possibilities to create more spectives, new tools, and newit’s about being aware of up your everyday world. You radical change. But educa- approaches. Design Thinkingthe world around you, talk with these people, you tors need to experiment, too, is one of them.believing that you play a role listen to them, you consider and Design Thinking is allin shaping that world, and how best to help them do about learning by doing.taking action toward a more good work. Design Think-desirable future. Design ing begins from this place of It’s Optimistic. DesignThinking gives you faith in deep empathy and builds on Thinking is the fundamentalyour creative abilities and the power of these empa- belief that we all can createa process to take action thetic questions and insights. change—no matter howthrough when faced with a big a problem, how little timedifficult challenge. It’s Collaborative. Design or how small a budget. No Thinking requires conver- matter what constraints sation, critique and all-out exist around you, designing teamwork. And that’s some- can be an enjoyable process. thing that might be a bit of a shift, because despite the fact that educators are surrounded by people all day long, teaching remains an often solitary profession. Still, addressing complex (or even not-so-complex) chal- lenges benefits significantly from the views of multiple perspectives, and others’ cre- ativity bolstering your own.
  7. 7. DT for Ed | Guide | p. 4 The design process is what It’s a deeply human approach puts Design Thinking into that relies on your ability action. It’s a structured to be intuitive, to interpret approach to generating and what you observe and to evolving ideas. Its five phases develop ideas that are emo- help navigate the develop- tionally meaningful to those ment from identifying a you are designing for—all design challenge to finding skills you are well versed inThe Design and building a solution. as an educator.ProcessPhASeS dIsCOvEry IntErprEtatIOn IdEatIOn ExpErImEntatIOn EvOlutIOnI have a challenge. I learned something. I see an opportunity. I have an idea. I tried something new.How do I approach it? How do I interpret it? What do I create? How do I build it? How do I evolve it?Discovery builds a solid Interpretation transforms Ideation means generat- Experimentation brings Evolution is the develop-foundation for your ideas. your stories into mean- ing lots of ideas. Brain- your ideas to life. Building ment of your conceptCreating meaningful ingful insights. Observa- storming encourages you prototypes means making over time. It involves plan-solutions for students, par- tions, field visits, or just a to think expansively ideas tangible, learning ning next steps, communi-ents, teachers, colleagues simple conversation can and without constraints. while building them, and cating the idea to peopleand administrators be great inspiration—but It’s often the wildest ideas sharing them with other who can help you realizebegins with a deep under- finding meaning in that that spark visionary people. Even with early it, and documenting thestanding for their needs. and turning it into action- thoughts. With careful and rough prototypes, process. Change oftenDiscovery means opening able opportunities for preparation and a clear you can receive a direct happens over time, andup to new opportunities, design is not an easy task. set of rules, a brainstorm response and learn how reminders of even subtleand getting inspired to It involves storytelling, session can yield hun- to further improve and signs of progress arecreate new ideas. With the as well as sorting and dreds of fresh ideas. refine an idea. important.right preparation, this can condensing thoughts untilbe eye-opening and will you’ve found a compellinggive you a good under- point of view and clearstanding of your design direction for ideation.challenge.
  8. 8. DT for Ed | Guide | p. 5 The design process may The design process therefore seem very straightforward integrates various modes at first glance, but there is of working: some steps are one important aspect to more reflective, others are understand: its real value hands-on, and some encour- lies in the mix of tangible age interactions with people problem solving and abstract outside of your team. To help thinking. The very concrete you know what to expect,One Thing observations of the first phase are abstracted as you define themes and insights. the following indicators will guide you through the meth- ods in the Toolkit section:to Keep Only after you have devel- oped a sense of meaning Reflectivein Mind and direction do you develop Hands-On tangible solutions. What may seem like a detour in Interaction idea development ultimately makes your solutions much This design process can be more meaningful. applied in many forms. The following pages contain a It requires taking a step back variety of examples of how to reflect, analyze, evaluate, it has been used to create think again and then evolve. new, relevant solutions in an This takes time—a scarce educational context. resource—and can be chal- lenging, as educators are used to solving problems on the spot in their classrooms. But there are no shortcuts.The more abstractsteps often feel The small, sometimes hidden,more intense, details often hold the keys tobut pay off in solving complex challenges.the long run.ABSTRACTCONCReTe dIsCOvEry IntErprEtatIOn IdEatIOn ExpErImEntatIOn EvOlutIOn
  9. 9. DT for Ed | Guide | p. 6 current students in the year Over the course of the follow- 2060. They imagined what ing school year, the teachers these people had done in tested many ideas in their their lives and careers. As a classes. One teacher devel- group, the teachers then cap- oped new communications tured the most interesting for parents. The technology themes and worked back- team built new tools to sup- ward to understand the skills port teachers in InvestigativeCase Study these people would have needed to develop as chil- dren to be successful. Armed Learning. Another teacher even received a grant to reno- vate a classroom and createOrmondale with this inspiration from their own experiences, the a different learning environ- ment for her students. TheyElementary group then went to visit out- didn’t go it alone: to build side organizations that were a network of learning and facing analogous challenges. support, the staff dedicatedSchool Through interpreting all this time in their weekly meetings information, the participants to discuss what was happen- came up with many genera- ing, learn from each other, tive questions, such as “how and help each other through might we enable the globally rough patches. aware student?” and “how might we provide opportuni- In their second year, the ties for interest-driven learn- group got back together ing?” The brainstorms that for a second workshop to followed started with ideas make sense of all the experi- about tools and classroom ments they had conducted design and expanded out around the school. During to include curriculum and this session, they shared and the educational system as a discussed their experiences, whole. Through prototyping created a typology of Investi- several of these ideas, the gative Learning methods,how might When the teachers and teachers saw a set of similar and developed a framework administrators at Ormondale patterns emerge across all for Investigative Learningwe create elementary, a public K-3 school in California, wanted their prototypes: they were all passionate about a teach- standards and assessments.a 21st century to find ways to bring 21st ing and learning approach Today, the faculty at Ormon- that they called Investiga- dale elementary School arelearning expe- century skills into their classrooms, they knew the tive Learning. This approach continuing to evolve theirrience for challenge would take time and long-term commitment. would address students not as receivers of information, approach to Investigative Learning. As new teachersour students? They chose a year-long time- but as shapers of knowledge. join the school, other faculty frame and used the design At the end of the workshop, help them understand how process to get started. the teachers planned and to construct these experi-Find videos about committed to experiments ences, and they have createdInvestigative Learning During the summer, the based on this philosophy that a “Manual of Investigativeat Ormondale atpvsd.net. teachers kicked off the proj- they could conduct in their Learning” to keep track of ect with a two-day Design classrooms. their philosophy and meth- Thinking workshop. The ods. They have gained sup- Discovery phase began with port from their school board, an activity that asked them and have become recognized to develop empathy for a as a “California Distinguished learner in the 21st century: School.” the exercise entailed teach- ers imagining one of their
  10. 10. DT for Ed | Guide | p. 7 In 2010, the faculty at River- After several experiments dale Country School, an inde- with a few different collabo- pendent K-12 school in New ration tools, the Riverdale York, embarked on a design teachers now have an online project to encourage more platform for sharing lesson collaboration among teach- plans and activities as well ers. With three teachers lead- as creating meeting agendas ing the process as facilita- to save time. “It seems toCase Study tors, a group of 15 worked as a design team to take on the challenge. They started with be working for us. We’re shar- ing more as a team and we’ve freed up time to get moreRiverdale observations and conversa- tions—not just in their own done in our meetings,” said one of the team members.Country School school, but also with analo- gous environments. Splitting And there’s still a lot more into three teams, they inter- happening: teachers at viewed employees at Sirius Riverdale were so energized XM, Consumer Reports and by Design Thinking that they IDeO—organizations that submitted ideas for several were noted for their team- design projects. In early work and collaboration. One 2011, they assembled a of the teacher-facilitators core team of five teachers to noted that this inspiration conduct a one-year project was important to the team: to revise the school’s pro- “It was really provocative. gram in character, conduct, We saw that people have very and ethics. Another team of different ways of managing teachers is helping to design their time and we developed a smooth transition for the a new awareness [of these new head of the elementaryhow might companies].” school. Teachers are using It was the prototyp- Design Thinking in their ing and feedback thatwe create a made me really see the value in this pro- Bringing this inspiration back on-site, the team dis- classrooms and are sharing their enthusiasm and ideasculture of col- cess. We have become a more effective team cussed their learnings and with their colleagues. The impact has expanded waylaboration? that now shares ideas, clustered them into three resources and feedback themes: online tools, faculty beyond the initial design proj- on a regular basis. spaces and team-building ect and continues to spread. Michael, activities. They identified 1st Grade Teacher opportunities for design within these areas, and brain- stormed dozens of ideas. In smaller groups, they built dif- ferent prototypes, including an online collaboration tool to make faculty meetings more effective, a new faculty lounge, and potluck brunches to bring teachers together in casual settings.

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