Bab 2.0 grid basic

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Bab 2.0 grid basic

  1. 1. DEKSTOP PUBLISHING 2.0 THE GRID BASICS: STRUCTURAL LAYOUT DESIGN
  2. 2. BASIC PART OF PAGE <ul><li>a. Clarity </li></ul><ul><li>b. Efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>c. Economy </li></ul><ul><li>d. Continuity </li></ul>
  3. 3. TYPE OF GRIDS <ul><li>1. Manuscript Grid </li></ul><ul><li>Mainly used for publication such as books and essays which have smaller format sizes. </li></ul><ul><li>Best suited to continuous blocks of text and large images that full out all of the live area or while page bleed </li></ul><ul><li>Also called Single Column Grids or Block Grids </li></ul>GRIDS: an imaginary pattern of crossed lines which serves as a guide for placing items in relation to one another
  4. 5. TYPE OF GRIDS <ul><li>2. Column Grid </li></ul><ul><li>Series of columns </li></ul><ul><li>Used in magazines, newspapers, book or any publication where the text isn’t continuous or in situations where you have a number of different elements working together at once. </li></ul><ul><li>They are particularly useful for layout that need to be flexible, as the more columns you have the more flexible the structure becomes. </li></ul>
  5. 9. TYPE OF GRIDS <ul><li>3. Modular Grid </li></ul><ul><li>Used for more complex layout to contend with, for larger formats or when you need to fit in large amounts of information. </li></ul><ul><li>The page is divided both vertically and horizontally to create rows and columns, which in turn create modules. </li></ul><ul><li>Group of modules together create spatial zones that determine the placement of text and positioning of images </li></ul>
  6. 12. TYPE OF GRIDS <ul><li>4. Hierarchical Grid </li></ul><ul><li>Mostly used for Web design or electronic media which have an active navigation. </li></ul><ul><li>The page is arranged based on the importance of the information, and the information can be emphasized through sizes and placement or arrangement. </li></ul><ul><li>Colors also allow the reader to identify the importance of each section </li></ul>
  7. 15. THE ANATOMY OF GRID <ul><li>a. Columns </li></ul><ul><li>b. Modules </li></ul><ul><li>c. Margins </li></ul><ul><li>d. Flow lines </li></ul><ul><li>e. Spatial Zones </li></ul><ul><li>f. Markers </li></ul>
  8. 16. Columns <ul><li>Vertical divisions of space used to align visual elements </li></ul><ul><li>Single, multiple columns can be used or interchanged </li></ul><ul><li>The quantity and complexity of information determines columns </li></ul><ul><li>Gutter Width: Column Intervals, negative spacesthat separate one column from the next and prevent text and images from clashing </li></ul>
  9. 17. Modules
  10. 18. Margins <ul><li>Define the active area of a page and direct the viewer toward the visual elements </li></ul><ul><li>Margins may vary in size depending on format as well as content </li></ul><ul><li>Folios and footers may be placed in the margins </li></ul><ul><li>Margins are not intended to trap content, theyare instead used to activate the positive spacesin a layout </li></ul><ul><li>For layouts with large amounts of text (books),large margins are ideal as they provide breathing space </li></ul>
  11. 19. Flow lines <ul><li>Support for vertical columns by dividing the page into horizontal intervals to provide additional alignment points across a grid. </li></ul><ul><li>Wonderful tools to achieve consistency in a layout </li></ul><ul><li>– Dictate the horizontal positions of a visual elements and how they rise or fall along columns </li></ul>
  12. 21. Spatial Zones
  13. 22. Markers

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