• Save
Handbook 2012 2013
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Handbook 2012 2013

on

  • 772 views

DIPLOMA IN ITALIAN - Online

DIPLOMA IN ITALIAN - Online

Statistics

Views

Total Views
772
Views on SlideShare
772
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Handbook 2012 2013 Document Transcript

  • 1.         DIPLOMA IN ITALIAN               Dr Laura Incalcaterra McLoughlin Dott. Carmen Dell’Aria  1
  • 2. Contents INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................................4TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................... 4THE COURSE AT A GLANCE .....................................................................................................................4 Learning Objectives.........................................................................................................................4 Structure of the language course....................................................................................................5THE COURSE IN MORE DETAILS ..............................................................................................................5 The Language ..................................................................................................................................5 Rationale .........................................................................................................................................5 Objectives........................................................................................................................................7 Topics ............................................................................................................................................10 Texts ..............................................................................................................................................12 Vocabulary ....................................................................................................................................12 Grammar .......................................................................................................................................12 Learning and Teaching Methods...................................................................................................12 Assessment Information ...............................................................................................................12STRUCTURE OF THE COURSE IN YEAR ONE...........................................................................................15 Modules ........................................................................................................................................15 IT128 and IT129.............................................................................................................................16Grammar Notes.....................................................................................................................................17NOUNS ..................................................................................................................................................18ARTICLES ...............................................................................................................................................19 INDEFINITE ARTICLES ....................................................................................................................19 DEFINITE ARTICLES........................................................................................................................19DEMONSTRATIVES ................................................................................................................................20ADJECTIVES ...........................................................................................................................................22POSSESSIVES .........................................................................................................................................24PRONOUNS ...........................................................................................................................................25USE OF NE WITH QUANTITIES...............................................................................................................27COMPARATIVES AND SUPERLATIVES....................................................................................................28 I.  IL COMPARATIVO: .....................................................................................................................28 II. IL SUPERLATIVO RELATIVO........................................................................................................28 III. SUPERLATIVO ASSOLUTO.........................................................................................................29 III.  COMPARATIVI E SUPERLATIVI IRREGOLARI ............................................................................29 2
  • 3. VERBS ....................................................................................................................................................30 ESSERE...........................................................................................................................................30 AVERE............................................................................................................................................30 PRESENT TENSE.............................................................................................................................31 PASSATO PROSSIMO .....................................................................................................................32 IMPERFETTO..................................................................................................................................34 DIRECT PRONOUNS WITH PASSATO PROSSIMO...........................................................................37 THE FUTURE ..................................................................................................................................39  3
  • 4.  INTRODUCTION  The Diploma in Italian ‐ Online is a two‐year course delivered mainly online, but with a number of face‐to‐face  sessions  held  on  campus  during  the  year.  Dates  of  these  sessions  are  specified  under Structure of the Course in year One, Modules. Further details will be communicated at the beginning of  the  year.  Participants  who  have  difficulties  attending  these  sessions  should  inform  the  course coordinator  immediately  at  the  beginning  of  the  course  and  (s)he  will  try  to  facilitate  them. However, participants should note that they are expected to present for written exams on campus twice  a  year,  at  the  end  of  each  semester  and  for  oral  examination  once  a  year  at  the  end  of Semester Two. The  Diploma  in  Italian  ‐  Online is  based  on  a  collaborative,  communicative  approach  and  students are  encouraged  to  participate  in  virtual  class  activities  with  their  peers  and  e‐tutors.  The  course concentrates on all four main language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) and provides a gradual introduction to the structures and functions of the language. In addition, a module on oral and intercultural skills will introduce various aspects of Italian life from an intercultural perspective. This  book  contains  general  information  on  the  course,  its  objectives,  and  its  structure.  It  also contains an overview of the main language structures which will be introduced in year one.  TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS No specialist technical knowledge is required for this course, however participants are expected to be  familiar  with  basic  computer  skills:  knowledge  of  Word,  ability  to  upload  and  download  files (written  documents,  audio  and  video  files),  ability  to  download  and  install  some  very  simple  free software and use Skype or similar applications. Clear instructions will be given each time and help will be provided.  Participants will be expected to have access to a PC/laptop with a sound card to allow for listening to and recording of audio material. The course is made available through a platform called Blackboard. Participants will be automatically enrolled  in  Blackboard  at  the  beginning  of  the  academic  year.  When  logging  onto  Blackboard, students will see their course(s) and will find all their study material there. This platform is extremely easy to use; no previous knowledge of the system is required. Blackboard is also accessible with a smartphone. An  introductory  session  at  the  beginning  of  Semester  One  will  show  participants  how  to  use Blackboard and discuss any technical issues. THE COURSE AT A GLANCE Learning Objectives The Diploma in Italian ‐ Online aims to provide students with basic interaction and communication skills  at  the  end  of  year  one  and  achieve  an  intermediate  level  of  fluency  at  the  end  of  year  two. More specifically, the Diploma in Italian ‐ Online follows, albeit creatively at times, the guidelines set by the Council of Europe in the Common European Framebook of Reference for Languages (CEFR).   4
  • 5. CEFR is a document which defines levels of fluency in a language according to a “can do” approach. The Diploma in Italian – Online aims to achieve level A2 (at the end of year one) and B1 (at the end of year 2).  These levels are described as follows:  Independent  B1  Can understand the main points of clear standard input on User  familiar  matters  regularly  encountered  in  work,  school,  leisure,  etc.  Can  deal  with  most  situations  likely  to  arise  whilst  travelling  in  an  area  where  the  language  is  spoken.  Can  produce  simple  connected  text  on  topics  which  are  familiar  or  of  personal  interest.  Can  describe  experiences  and  events,  dreams,  hopes  &  ambitions  and  briefly  give  reasons and explanations for opinions and plans. Basic  A2  Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions User  related  to  areas  of  most  immediate  relevance  (e.g.  very  basic  personal  and  family  information,  shopping,  local  geography, employment). Can communicate in simple and  routine  tasks  requiring  a  simple  and  direct  exchange  of  information on familiar and routine matters. Can describe  in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate  environment and matters in areas of immediate need. Source: Council of Europe, Language Policy Division:  http://www.coe.int/t/DG4/Portfolio/?M=/main_pages/levels.html <18.08.2012> Structure of the language course The language course  (modules IT128 and IT129) is divided into 10 learning units per year, plus an introductory unit at the beginning of year one which will contain a glossary of the most widely used instructions  (i.e.  Read,  listen  etc),  an  explanation  of  symbols  etc.  A  learning  unit  (Unità)  is  a collection  of  material  (written  texts,  audio/video  clips  and/or  images)  and  tasks  relating  to  one particular topic.  Each unit consists of two parts and takes two weeks to complete. Learning material will  be  made  available  at  the  beginning  of  each  week  and  participants  are  expected  to  dedicate approximately  4  hours  per  week  to  the  course  (studying  and  interacting  with  peers  and  e‐tutors).  Each unit includes a Glossary of relevant vocabulary and a Language Laboratory session for practice with pronunciation and intonation. THE COURSE IN MORE DETAILS The Language The  language  to  be  studied  and  assessed  is  the  modern  standard  version  of  Italian.    This  is  the language as spoken in Italy.  During their course of study, students may also encounter dialects and provincial  variants.    Students  should  be  aware  of  different  linguistic  registers,  for  example  formal and informal. When appropriate, colloquialisms and of regional differences will also be highlighted. Rationale Language  is  the  basis  of  all  communication  and  human  interaction.  By  learning  a  second  or subsequent  language,  students  develop  knowledge,  understanding  and  skills  for  successful participation in the dynamic world of the 21st century.  Communicating in another language expands students’ horizons as both national and global citizens.    5
  • 6. Language and culture are interdependent.  The study of another language develops in students the ability to move successfully across and within cultures, and, in the process, to experience, value and embrace the diversity of humanity.   Contemporary  research  has  shown  that  learning  a  language  facilitates  cognitive  and  intellectual development beyond the language classroom.  It enhances creativity and develops more refined and sophisticated skills in analysis, negotiation and problem‐solving.  Literacy  skills  are  enhanced  through  the  study  of  another  language.    As  the  use  of  language  is  a process  of  communication,  students’  learning  experiences  offer  opportunities  to  consolidate  and extend  their  interpersonal  skills.    By  engaging  with  various  modes  of  communication,  students develop effective skills in interacting, and understanding and producing texts.  Students  who  learn  another  language  understand  how  languages  work  as  systems.    They  become aware  of  the  structure  of  that  language  through  the  analysis  of  patterns  and  can  apply  this knowledge  to  the  learning  of  other  languages.    By  making  comparisons  between  and  among languages, students strengthen their command of their first language.  Extensive migration from Italy during the last 150 years has resulted in Italian being spoken in many countries in Europe, in North and South America, Africa and Australia.   Italians and the Italian language make a distinctive contribution to politics, art, architecture, cuisine, music, science, literature, film and theatre.  The study of Italian enhances students’ enjoyment and appreciation  of  these  areas.    Students  have  much  to  gain  by  acquiring  knowledge  of  the  language and cultural heritage of Italy.   The  study  of  Italian  provides  students  with  opportunities  for  continued  learning  and  for  future employment and experience, both domestically and internationally, in areas such as public relations, commerce, hospitality, education, marketing, international relations, media and tourism. DescriptionThis Diploma in Italian – Online introduces students to Italian and its structures. The topics studied in the  course  will  be  introduced  through  a  variety  of  texts  in  the  target  language,  with  a  view  to increasing learners’ awareness of the sounds, lexicon and structure of their language of study.AimsThe Diploma in Italian ‐ Online aims to:    develop learners’ skills in effective communication   sensitize students to the particular sounds and intonation of Italian    introduce students to the knowledge of the nature of Italian structures and vocabulary    introduce students to strategies for writing short and simple texts in the target language    expose students to a variety of materials from a range of sources    enable students to develop understanding of the interdependence of language and culture   6
  • 7.  Objectives  Communication                               Objective 1 – Interacting: Students will develop the linguistic and intercultural knowledge, understanding and skills to communicate actively in Italian in interpersonal situations. Objective 2 – Understanding Texts: Students will interpret and respond to texts, applying their knowledge and understanding of language and culture. Objective 3 – Producing Texts: Students will create and present texts in Italian for specific audiences, purposes and contexts, incorporating their linguistic and intercultural knowledge, understanding and skills.   Objectives Outcomes Students: 1.1 establish and maintain communication in Italian 1.2 manipulate linguistic structures to express ideas effectively in Italian Interacting 1.3 sequences ideas and information 1.4 apply knowledge of the culture of Italian-speaking communities to interact appropriately 2.1 understand and interpret information in texts using a range of strategies 2.2 convey the gist of and identify specific information in texts 2.3 summarise the main points of a text 2.4 draw conclusions from or justify an opinion about a text 2.5 identify the purpose, context and audience of a text Understanding Texts 2.6 identify and explain aspects of the culture of Italian-speaking communities in texts 3.1 produce texts appropriate to audience, purpose and context also with the support of speech analysis technology 3.2 structure and sequence ideas and information 3.3 apply knowledge of diverse linguistic structures to convey Producing Texts information and express original ideas in Italian 3.4 apply knowledge of the culture of Italian-speaking communities to the production of texts. 7
  • 8. Key CompetenciesThe  key  competencies  of  communicating  ideas  and  information  and  collecting,  analysing  and organising information reflect core skills in language learning and are explicit in the objectives and outcomes of the syllabus.   The other key competencies are developed through the methodologies of the syllabus and through classroom pedagogy.   Students interact with natives, and through this interaction the key competencies of planning and organising activities and working with others and in teams are developed.   In  interacting  with  others  via  social  networks  and  virtual  worlds,  the  student  will  develop  the  key competency of using technology.  The skills associated with the interpretation of texts, such as the ability  to  comprehend  meaning  from  context  and  using  a  dictionary,  contribute  towards  the student’s development of the key competency of solving problems.  ContentObjective 1 – Interacting Outcomes:Students:1.1 establish and maintain communication in Italian1.2 manipulate linguistic structures to express ideas effectively in Italian1.3 sequence ideas and information1.4 apply knowledge of the culture of Italian-speaking communities to interact appropriately.Students learn about: Students learn to: the importance of listening for key words to  listen for meaning assist understanding the importance of reading for key words to  read for meaning assist understanding links in communication  use strategies to initiate, maintain and conclude an interaction, eg Buongiorno! scusi, mi può dire, allora, ci vediamo, grazie… the purpose and context of communication  select and incorporate particular vocabulary and intonation structures to achieve specific communication goals register in language use  interact with reference to context, purpose and audience, eg Dimmi. Mi dica. responding to factual and open-ended  maintain an interaction by responding to questions and asking questions and sharing information ways to support effective interaction  use appropriate language features to enhance communication, eg tone, intonation, rhythm the logical sequencing of ideas  structure information and ideas coherently formal and informal language, and when and  apply appropriate social conventions in where it is used formal and informal contexts, eg terms of address sociolinguistic conventions relating to  use language and/or behaviour everyday activities. appropriate to social context, eg Buon appetito! Grazie altrettanto. 8
  • 9.  Objective 2 – Understanding Texts  Outcomes:Students:2.1 understand and interpret information in texts using a range of strategies2.2 convey the gist of and identifies specific information in texts2.3 summarise the main points of a text2.4 draw conclusions from or justify an opinion about a text2.5 identify the purpose, context and audience of a text2.6 identify and explain aspects of the culture of Italian-speaking communities in texts.Students learn about: Students learn to: ways in which texts are constructed for specific  identify why, how or to whom a text is purposes delivered or presented ways in which texts are formatted for particular  explore the way text content is presented purposes and effects and how ideas and information are sequenced, eg headings, paragraphing, introductory sentences, topic shifts ways of identifying relevant details in texts when  make judgements about the relevance of listening or reading for specific information detail in understanding text, eg extracting ideas and issues referred to in text ways of inferring meaning from text  use contextual and other clues to infer meaning from text resources available to access, enhance or  access available resources to assist promote independent learning comprehension of a text, eg dictionaries, word lists, glossaries, charts the effect of syntax on meaning  analyse ways in which words, phrases and sentences are constructed, eg how words are modified for grammatical effect cultural attitudes that add meaning to texts  identify and discuss cultural influences in specific texts, eg newspapers, magazines, advertisements and films language used to express cultural values, and to  explain cultural references in texts, eg Ogni represent people and cultures in texts pomeriggio faccio un pisolino dopo pranzo. register and common expressions in language  explain the use of words and expressions use. with particular cultural significance in texts, eg idiomatic expressions, colloquialisms. Eg In bocca al lupo, quattro chiacchiere.  9
  • 10.  Objective 3 – Producing Texts Outcomes:Students:3.1 produce texts appropriate to audience, purpose and context3.2 structure and sequence ideas and information3.3 apply knowledge of diverse linguistic structures to convey information and express original ideas in Italian3.4 apply knowledge of the culture of Italian-speaking communities to the production of texts.Students learn about: Students learn to: the structure and format of particular texts  present and organise information in ways appropriate to audience, purpose and context the purpose and context of a text and their  plan, draft and edit text influence on the choice of structure, format and vocabulary the logical sequencing of ideas in extended  sequence ideas and information in texts text the application of known linguistic  apply a range of vocabulary and linguistic structures in new contexts structures across a range of contexts language choices and their effect on  evaluate the accuracy and appropriateness intended meaning of structures when constructing and editing text resources available to enhance and expand  extend and refine their use of language, eg independent learning by using dictionaries, word lists and grammar references, accessing authentic texts in print and online register in language use.  use culturally appropriate language when creating and presenting texts.  Topics The prescribed topics should be studied from two interdependent perspectives:   personal world  Italian‐speaking communities.  The two perspectives will enable students to develop knowledge and understanding of and skills in the Italian language, linked to cultural values, attitudes and practices. The perspective, the personal world,  will enable students to use Italian to express and share ideas about experiences and activities relating to daily life and transactions in their own world. The  perspective,  the  Italian‐speaking  communities,  will  enable  students  to  inquire  about  and  to express  ideas  in  order  to  undertake  activities  and  transactions  appropriately  in  one  or  more communities where Italian is spoken.  10
  • 11.  The prescribed topics provide an organisational focus so that tasks can be presented as a series of related learning experiences in cohesive contexts. Personal  Italian‐speaking World  Communities  Topics will include:   Family life, home and neighbourhood   People, places and communities   Education and work   Friends, recreation and pastimes   Holidays, travel and tourism   Future plans and aspirations 11
  • 12. Texts  Students are encouraged to read, view and listen to a wide range of texts, including authentic texts.  They may be expected to produce the following written texts in the final examination.  The language to be used is the modern standard version of Italian.  article (ie. for a school magazine)  message  diary/journal entry  note  Email  postcard  informal letter  script of a talk (to an audience) Vocabulary While there is no prescribed vocabulary list, it is expected that students will be familiar with a range of vocabulary relevant to the topics prescribed in the syllabus. Grammar Throughout  the  two  year  Diploma  in  Italian  ‐  Online,  students  will  learn  about  grammatical structures in context.  The  grammatical  structures  that  will  be  defined  are  those  that  students  will  be  expected  to recognise and use by the end of the course.  They should be read in conjunction with the content of the  syllabus.    Grammar  should  be  used  to  support  the  process  of  language  acquisition  and  to facilitate communication, rather than being taught in isolation.   Further  information  on  grammatical  structures  students  will  be  expected  to  recognise and/or use is available online. Learning and Teaching Methods   Use of multimedia, Interactive classes, Self-directed learning, variety of authentic texts, language games.• Exploration and awareness of the basic structures of the target language• Production of simple texts in the target language• Working with simple authentic written and aural material in the target language• Communication in various basic situations of everyday life• Pronunciation practice Assessment Information A range of continuous assessment and summative assessment modes will apply, as follows: IT128 (Year 1, Semester 1); IT129 (Year 1, Semester 2) Assessment criteria: Grammatical & linguistic accuracy, learner awareness/autonomy, participation.   Continuous Assessment: 75%   End of semester exam: 25%     12
  • 13.     BREAKDOWN  PROJECT  TOTAL  LANGUAGE FORUM  GRAMM EX  WORK  LAB  END OF SEM  EXAM  20  10  25 20 25  100Project work will be assessed at the end of each semester. For each unit, the following marks will be allocated: Forum: 4, Grammar: 2; Language Laboratory: 4. Modules IT128 and IT129 include a “technical forum” for discussing technical issues. This forum is not evaluated and is not included in the marking scheme. IT130 (Year 1, Semester 1 and 2) Assessment criteria: Grammatical & linguistic accuracy, learner awareness/autonomy, participation, awareness of cultural/intercultural issues covered during the course.   Continuous Assessment: 10%   Project work: 60%   End of semester oral exam: 30%  Performance band descriptors Band 5 (marks: 70‐100)    Communicates effectively across a range of topics in spoken Italian   Writes cohesive, well‐structured texts appropriate to a range of audiences, purposes and contexts   Demonstrates an excellent control of vocabulary and language structures   Demonstrates an excellent understanding of a range of texts by identifying their audience, purpose  and context; by interpreting and summarising information; and by drawing conclusions and justifying  opinions about them.   Band 4 (marks: 60‐70)   Communicates across a range of topics in spoken Italian   Writes cohesive texts appropriate to audience, purpose and context   Demonstrates a good control of vocabulary and language structures   Demonstrates a good understanding of a range of texts by identifying their audience, purpose and  context; by interpreting and summarising information; and by drawing some conclusions and justifying  opinions about them.   Band 3 (marks: 50‐60)   Communicates ideas and information in spoken Italian   Writes texts with some regard to audience, purpose and context, linking ideas and information   Demonstrates some control of vocabulary and language structures   Demonstrates a general understanding of and identifies some specific information in a range of texts.    13
  • 14.  Band 2 (marks: 45‐50)    Communicates some ideas and information in familiar contexts in spoken Italian   Writes texts with some regard to purpose   Demonstrates a basic knowledge of Italian vocabulary and applies Italian grammar and syntax  inconsistently   Demonstrates a general understanding of straightforward texts and identifies some specific  information in more complex ones.   Band 1 (marks: 40‐45)   Understands some simple questions and responds in comprehensible spoken Italian   Writes some words, phrases and sentences in comprehensible Italian   Identifies some information in texts   Band 0 (marks: > 40)   Does not understand even simple questions and does not respond in comprehensible spoken Italian   Does not write phrases and sentences in comprehensible Italian   Does not Identify  information in texts  14
  • 15. STRUCTURE OF THE COURSE IN YEAR ONE  Modules (all compulsory) IT128  Italian language Skills – level 1, part 1 This module caters for absolute beginners and focuses on the four main language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) using regular practice based, as much as possible, on authentic material carefully selected to provide a gradual introduction to the structures and functions of the language.  Course coordinator:  Dr Laura McLoughlin  Course commences:  Monday, 17th September  Delivery:   Online with 3 on‐campus sessions   Assessment:  Written examination and continuous assessment   Weighting:  5 ECTS  Recommended texts Collins Italian‐English dictionary, 2005 Susanna Nocchi, Italian grammar in practice, Firenze: Alma Edizioni, 2003  Dates of on‐campus sessions: 8th September, 13th October, 1st December 2012  IT129     Italian language Skills ‐ level 1, part 2 This module continues to develop the four main language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) using regular practice based, as much as possible, on authentic material. At the end of the year students will have achieved level A2 of the Common European Framebook of Reference. Couse coordinator:  Dr Laura McLoughlin Course commences:  Monday, 7th  January 2013 Delivery:   Online with three on‐campus sessions  Assessment:  Written and listening examinations and continuous assessment Weighting:  5 ECTS  Recommended texts (see IT128) Dates of on‐campus sessions: 26th January, 23rd February, 30th March 2013  15
  • 16. IT130  Oral and Intercultural Skills This module will introduce a number of everyday situations as well as aspects of Italian culture and society from both a linguistic and intercultural perspective and will promote intercultural awareness among students. Students will learn to interact orally in the everyday situations presented during the course. Course coordinator:  Dr Laura McLoughlin Course commences:  Semester 1 & 2 Delivery:   Online with three on‐campus sessions per semester Assessment:  One essay/project on Italian culture to be submitted at the end of semester  2 and one oral examination at the end of semester 2.  Weighting:  5 ECTS  Reading List  Silvestrini, Viaggio nella storia, geografia, vita e cultura italiana, volume 1, Perugia: Guerra Edizioni, 2011  Dates of on‐campus sessions:  8th September, 13th October, 1st December 2012 ‐ 26th January, 23rd February, 30th March 2013.  On‐campus sessions for all modules will offer an opportunity to discuss any issues or doubts relating to the topics covered. In addition, cultural elements will be introduced, including geography, history, traditions, cuisine and cinema.IT128 and IT129: Italian Language Skills, Level 1, Part 1 & 2 The  10  Learning  Units  of  year  one  cover  situations  of  everyday  life  and  will  help  participants  to develop the necessary competence for basic interaction in Italian, from ordering in a restaurant, to booking a hotel, asking for information, discussing likes and dislikes, describing events in the past, etc. A breakdown of topics covered in year one follows: SEMESTER ONE (IT128)  SEMESTER TWO (IT129) Unità 1: Saluti e presentazioni.  Unità 6: Che tempo fa? Unità 2: Lavori o studi?  Unità 7: Cosa hai fatto lo scorso fine settimana? Unità 3: Vorrei un caffè, per favore.  Unità 8: Parenti Serpenti Unità 4: In viaggio  Unità 9: Segni particolari: bellissimo Unità 5: La routine quotidiana  Unità 10: La settimana della moda   Further information on individual learning units and their content is available online.  16
  • 17. Grammar NotesThis section contains an outline of the main topics covered in year one.       Further information is available online.  17
  • 18. NOUNS Italian nouns can be either masculine or feminine (and of course singular or plural).    Nouns ending in –o are generally masculine and in the plural they change the –o into –i: libro  → libri     Nouns ending in –a are generally feminine and in the plural they change the –a into   –e: casa → case     Nouns ending in –e can be either masculine or feminine and in the plural they change the –e  into –i (Nouns ending in –sione, ‐zione, ‐gione are always feminine): ristorante → ristoranti  (M); stazione → stazioni (F)  Some exceptions:  IL PROBLEMA     →  I PROBLEMI IL SISTEMA    →  I SISTEMI  IL PROGRAMMA    →  I PROGRAMMI  IL CINEMA    →  I CINEMA  LA MANO    →  LE MANI LA MOTO    →  LE MOTO (LA MOTOCICLETTA – LE MOTOCICLETTE) LA BICI      →  LE BICI ( LA BICICLETTA – LE BICICLETTE) L’AUTO      →  LE AUTO (L’AUTOMOBILE – LE AUTOMOBILI)                  18
  • 19. ARTICLES  Like English, Italian has indefinite articles (= a book, an apple) and definite articles (= the book). Articles agree in gender (masculine/feminine) and number (singular/plural) with the noun they refer to. The form of the article depends on the first letter / letters (vowel/consonant) of the word which immediately follows it.  ITALIAN VOWELS are A, E, I, O, U ITALIAN CONSONANTS are B, C, D, F, G, L, M, N, P, Q, R, S, T, V, J, W, X, Y appear only in words of foreign origin.  INDEFINITE ARTICLES   MASCULINE UN – when the word which follows begins with a vowel or with a consonant. UNO – when the word which follows begins with S + consonant, Z, GN, PS.FEMININE UN’- when the word which follows begins with a vowel. UNA – in all other cases. Esempi:   un albero, un uomo     un cellulare, un telefono, un bar       un’amica, un’isola     una casa, una penna DEFINITE ARTICLES   singular pluralMASCULINE IL when the word which follows begins →I with a consonant. L’ when the word which follows begins → GLI with a vowel. LO when the word which follows → GLI begins with S + consonant, Z, GN, PS.FEMININE LA when the word which follows begins with a consonant. → LE L’ when the word which follows begins with a vowel.Esempi:   l’ albero – gli alberi     il cellulare – i cellulari      l’isola – le isole  la casa – le case   19
  • 20.                 DEMONSTRATIVES Demonstratives correspond to this/that    Italian Demonstrative Pronouns       This  These  That  Those Masculine  before a consonant  questo  questi  quel  quei  before a vowel  quest  questi  quell  quegli Feminine  before a consonant  questa  queste quella quelle  before a vowel  quest  queste quell  quelle   Masculine: before z, gn, or s + consonant (quello: that, quegli: those) : Quegli studenti (those students)   Questo bambino è molto intelligente. (this child is very intelligent)  Questa studentessa è molto intelligente. (this female student is very intelligent)  Questa penna è mia (this pen is mine) Quella casa è molto grande. (that house is very big)  Quelle case sono molti grandi (those house are very big)  20
  • 21. EXPRESSING INDEFINITE QUANTITIES (=some)    SINGOLARE PLURALEMASCHILE IL = L’ = LO = I= GLI = DI + DEL DELL’ DELLO DEI DEGLIFEMMINILE LA = DELLA L’ = DELL’ LE = DELLE ESEMPIO: MASCHILE SINGOLARE: del pane (some bread); dell’aglio (some garlic); dello spumante (some champagne)  MASCHILE PLURALE: dei panini (some bread rolls); degli spaghetti (some spaghetti)  FEMMINILE SINGOLARE: della pasta (some pasta); dell’acqua (some water)  FEMMINILE PLURALE: delle bibite (some drinks)  *********************************************************************  NB: You can also use the following easier expressions:  Un po’ di (with things which cannot be counted: un po’ d’acqua, un po’ di pane ecc)  OR  qualche (always followed by the singular, with things which can be counted: qualche panino, qualche bottiglia di acqua ecc.)  21
  • 22. ADJECTIVES   Like nouns, adjectives can end in –o (i.e., if you look up the adjective SLOW in the dictionary, you will find the Italian LENTO . This adjective ends in –o) or in –e (i.e., if you look up the adjective FAST in the dictionary, you will find the Italian VELOCE. This adjective ends in –e). Italian adjectives agree in gender (masculine/feminine) and number (singular/plural) with the noun they refer to.     Adjectives ending in –o have four possible forms:    Masculine singular: ‐o  Masculine plural: ‐i  Feminine singular: ‐a  Feminine plural: ‐e  Esempio: NUOVO (new)   M:  libro nuovo – libri nuovi  cellulare nuovo – cellulari nuovi             F:   casa nuova – case nuove    canzone nuova – canzonii nuove     Adjectives ending in –e have only two forms:    Singular (masculine/feminine): ‐e  Plural (masculine/feminine):  ‐i  Esempio: INTERESSANTE  M:  libro interessante  – libri interessanti             F:  rivista interessante – riviste interessanti      Unlike English, in Italian adjectives usually come after the noun they refer to. Colours and nationalities ALWAYS come after the noun they refer to.  Esempio: vino rosso, mela verde, ragazzo irlandese, donna italiana.    The following nationalities end in –o and therefore (like all other adjectives in –o) have four  possible forms:   22
  • 23. americano  polacco arabo  spagnolo australiano  tedesco (masc. plur: tedeschi – fem plur: austriaco  tedesche) europeo  ecc . italiano      The following nationalities end in –e and therefore (like all other adjectives in –e)  have only two possible forms:  canadese  irlandese danese  portoghese francese  svedese inglese,  ecc.    COLOURS    The following colours end in –o and therefore, (like all other adjectives in –o) have  four possible forms:  bianco  grigio nero  giallo rosso  azzurro    The following colours end in –e and therefore (like all other adjectives in –e) have  only two possible forms:  arancione celeste marrone verde     The following colours NEVER change:  beige / avana blu rosa viola  23
  • 24.  POSSESSIVES   il mio la mia i miei le mieil tuo la tua i tuoi le tueil suo la sua i suoi le sueil nostro la nostra i nostri le nostreil vostro la vostra i vostri le vostreil loro la loro i loro le loro   Italian possessive adjectives agree in gender and number with the person or object “owned”, rather than with the “owner”:  Tu e i tuoi amici Stefano e la sua ragazza.  In Italian, the article is always used before the possessive adjective.  ONLY EXCEPTION: nouns referring to family members in the singular and NOT modified in any way:  Mio fratello  BUT  I miei fratelli    AND il mio fratellino (noun has                                                                                                              been modified) Tua zia      le tue zie  Sua madre    I suoi genitori   24
  • 25. PRONOUNS   Italian has a number of different pronouns: reflexive, direct, indirect pronouns. Whatever the pronoun, it always comes immediately before the verb.    REFLEXIVE PRONOUNS correspond to myself, yourself, onself etc. They are used with  verbs like chiamarsi, alzarsi, vestirsi ecc.   mi chiamo ci chiamiamo  ti chiami vi chiamate  si chiama si chiamano     DIRECT PRONOUNS correspond to me, you, him, her etc.   Incontri Mario stasera? Sì, lo  incontro alle 8. (I meet him at 8)  mi incontra ci incontrano  ti incontro vi incontro lo incontro li incontro  la incontro le incontro        INDIRECT PRONOUNS correspond to to (for) me / to (for) yo,  etc.   mi presta ci prestanoPresto €100  a Mario → gli  ti presto vi presto presto €100 (I am lending  €100  to him)  gli presto gli presto  le presto   Verbs like PIACERE / SERVIRE / MANCARE are preceded by an indirect pronoun:  A Roberto piace la pizza rossa → gli piace la pizza rossa (he likes pizza)  A Roberto piacciono i gelati → gli piacciono i gelati (he likes ice‐creams)  A noi serve un chilo di pane → ci serve un chilo di pane (we need 1 kg of bread)  A noi servono due chili di pane → ci servono 2 chili di pane (we need 2 kg of bread)  A Maria manca la famiglia → le manca la famiglia (she misses her family)  A Maria mancano gli amici → le mancano gli amici (she misses her friends)  25
  • 26. Which pronoun should I use: direct or indirect? (Direct pronouns answer to the question WHOM? WHAT?. Indirect pronouns answer to the question TO/FOR WHOM? TO/FOR WHAT?)  ● Stasera vedo Roberto al bar. ○ Chi vedi? ● Roberto. LO vedo alle 7.    direct  ● Telefono a Stefano verso le 5. ○ A chi telefoni? ● A Stefano. GLI telefono alle 5.  indirect  ● Voglio regalare qualcosa a Daniela? ○ A chi ? ● A Daniela. LE voglio regalare un cellulare.   indirect  ● Devo incontrare Marina più tardi. ○ Chi ? ● Marina. LA incontro oggi pomeriggio.   direct  ● Preferisco la sciarpa gialla. ○ Che cosa? ● La sciarpa. LA preferisco gialla.   direct  ● Prenoto i biglietti per l’aereo. ○ Che cosa? ● I biglietti. LI prenoto oggi.  direct    ●Offro il caffè agli amici. ○ A chi? ● Agli amici. GLI offro il caffè.   indirect  26
  • 27.  USE OF NE WITH QUANTITIES   We use ne to replace nouns that come after a number or an expression of quantity like molto, quanto, troppo, un po’ di, un chilo di and so on.  Examples: Quanti panini vuoi? ‐ Ne voglio due. (= Voglio due panini.) How many bread rolls do you want? ‐ "I want two of them." Quanto pane vuole? ‐ Ne voglio 3 chili. (= Voglio tre chili di pane.) How much bread do you want? ‐ "I want three Kg of it." In the examples above, you would probably omit the “of it” and “of them” in English, but ne in Italian is mandatory in this context.    Like any pronoun, ne goes before the conjugated verb. It never changes, so we use ne  for masculine, feminine, singular and plural.  27
  • 28. COMPARATIVES AND SUPERLATIVES (I COMPARATIVI E I SUPERLATIVI) I.  IL COMPARATIVO: There are three comparatives:   1) More …. than più...di più...che  2) Less… than meno...di meno...che We use "DI":   when two people/objects are compared with respect to one quality/action Mario è più alto di Stefano (= I am comparing Mario and Stefano in relation to height)    before numbers or pronouns Mario è più alto di me.  We use "CHE":   when comparing two qualities/actions referring to just one person/object Mario è più bello che simpatico (= I am comparing two qualities referring to Mario, his  beauty and his niceness)  4.in front of a preposition 5.in front of an infinitive  3) As much as a. (così)...come or (tanto)...quanto  (for adjective and adverbs:  "così...come" and "tanto...quanto" are adverbs and there is no agreement) b. (tanto)...quanto (for nouns:  here "tanto...quanto" are adjectives and there is agreement) c. (tanto) quanto...  (for verbs:  "(tanto)...quanto" are adverbs and there is no agreement) così and tanto are optional and usually avoided  II. IL SUPERLATIVO RELATIVO This is one of the easiest grammatical points in Italian.  The relative superlative is formed by: the definite article (il, la, i , le) + (noun) + più/meno + adjective + di + the term in relation to which we are comparing:  È la prsona più simpatica di quella comitiva  (it is like English, really, except that in Italian you use "di" instead of "in")    28
  • 29.  III. SUPERLATIVO ASSOLUTO It is the equivalent of the English "very+adjective" and "adjective+est" or "most+adjective."  In Italian this can be expressed in several ways: 1. by adding ‐issimo/a/i/e at the end of an adjective 2. by placing molto, tanto, parecchio, assai in front of the adjective 3. by using the prefix arci‐, stra‐, super‐, ultra‐ 4. by using stock phrases such as ricco sfondato (filthy rich); ubriaco fradicio (very drunk); stanco morto (dead tired); bagnato fradicio (soaking wet); innamorato cotto (madly in love)... 5. by repeating the adjective or the adverb 6. some adjectives have irregular superlatives: acre/acerrimo; celebre/celeberrimo; integro/integerrimo; celebre/celeberrimo; misero/miserrimo; salubre/saluberrimo; in spoken language, however, people just avoid "‐issimo" with these and use "molto, tanto, parecchio, assai." BUT BASICALLY, IF YOU KNOW (1) and (2) YOU ARE SET    III.  COMPARATIVI E SUPERLATIVI IRREGOLARI The ones you absolutely must know are the following: the comparative of "bene" is always "meglio" (and never "più bene”) the comparative of "buono" is "migliore" ("più buono" can also be used) the comparative of "male" is always "peggio"  (and never "più male") the comparative of "cattivo" is "peggiore" ("più cattivo" can also be used) "maggiore" is an alternative to "più grande" (più grande=bigger; maggiore=greater) "minore" is an alternative to "più piccolo" (più piccolo=smaller; minore=lesser)  29
  • 30. VERBS  ESSERE  Essere (= to be) is an irregular verb:    (io)     sono  (tu)     sei  (lui/lei/Lei)   è  (noi)    siamo  (voi)    siete  (loro)    sono    C’è  = there is  Ci sono = there are    SOME EXPRESSIONS WITH ESSERE:    essere di + name of a city   ‐ to be from (sono di Roma)  essere di + name of person   ‐to belong to (questa chitarra è di Marco)  di chi è?       ‐ whose is it?  di chi sono?       ‐ whose are they?  essere in anticipo     ‐ to be early  essere in ritardo     ‐ to be late    AVERE  Avere (= to have) is also an irregular verb:      (io)     ho  (tu)     hai  (lui/lei/Lei)   ha  (noi)    abbiamo  (voi)    avete  (loro)    hanno    SOME EXPRESSIONS WITH AVERE:   quanti anni hai?    ‐ how old are you?  avere caldo    ‐ to feel warm ho ….. anni    ‐ I am ….. years old  avere freddo    ‐ to feel cold avere fame    ‐ to be hungry  avere ragione    ‐ to be right avere sete     ‐ to be thirsty  avere torto    ‐ to be wrong avere paura    ‐ to be afraid  avere bisogno di    ‐ to need avere sonno    ‐ to be sleepy  avere voglia di     ‐ to feel like (Ho  avere fretta    ‐ to be in a hurry  fame, ho voglia di un panino)  30
  • 31. PRESENT TENSE   The infinitive of all Italian regular verbs end in –are, ‐ere or –ire.  When you look up a verb in the dictionary you will find the infinitive (corresponding to to work, to study, etc.). The present tense of regular verbs is formed by dropping the infinitive ending (‐are, ‐ere or –ire) and adding the appropriate endings to the remaining stem. The ending is different for each person.   A group of verbs in –ire behave slightly differently, as shown in the following table:   LAVORARE VEDERE DORMIRE CAPIRE io lavor- o ved- o dorm- o cap- isco !tu lavor- i ved- i dorm- i cap- isci !lui/lei/Lei lavor- a ved- e dorm- e cap- isce !noi lavor- iamo ved- iamo dorm- iamo cap- iamovoi lavor- ate ved- ete dorm- ite cap- iteloro lavor- ano ved- ono dorm- ono cap- iscono !   Other frequerntly used verbs like capire: preferire, pulire, finire, costruire (ecc.)  A number of verbs are irregular in the present. Please see Contatto 1, p.53 for a list of these verbs.    The present tense is used to talk about events which are taking place now or will take place  in the future. It often replaces the English to be doing…  Guardo la televisione       ‐ I watch TV / I am watching TV Domani parto per gli Stati Uniti  ‐ I am leaving / will be leaving for the States  tomorrow      The present tense + da is also used in expressions of time corresponding to I have been  doing something since…  Studio italiano da settembre    ‐ I have been studying Italian since settembre Abito a Galway da tre mesi    ‐ I have been living in Galway for three months.  31
  • 32. EXPRESSING THE PAST (1):  PASSATO PROSSIMO  Italian uses several different verb tenses to talk about the past. When talking about actions or events, the passato prossimo (present perfect) is the most often used. Depending on the context, it can translate the English “I have done” and “I did”.  When to use: It can refer to recent events:    Sabato sono andata in centro e ho comprato un paio di scarpe.   On Saturday I went to the town centre and I bought a pair of shoes.  Or it can refer to events which happened a long time ago:   Cinque anni fa ho lavorato a Firenze per due mesi.   Five years ago I worked in Florence for two months.  How to form: The passato prossimo is formed by combining the present tense of avere (to have) or essere (to be) and the past participle (parlato, venduto, dormito, ecc = spoken, sold, slept, etc.).    The past participle of regular verbs is formed as follows:    ARE  ►ATO     parlare   ► parlato   ERE  ►UTO     vendere  ► venduto    IRE   ►ITO     dormire  ► dormito    The form of avere depends on who carried out the action, but the past participle does not change.      (io) ho parlato      (noi) abbiamo parlato   (tu) hai parlato      (voi) avete parlato   (lui/lei/Lei) ha parlato    (loro) hanno parlato    The form of essere also depends on who carried out the action, but in this case the past participle changes depending on whether the subject is masculine or feminine, singular or plural:    (io) sono andato/a    (noi) siamo andati/e   (tu) sei andato/a    (voi) siete andati/e   (lui/lei/Lei) è andato/a    (loro) sono andati/e  Which verbs take essere?  32
  • 33.  A. ESSERE, STARE    Il mese scorso sono stato/a a Londra  B. MOST VERBS OF MOVEMENT OR NON‐MOVEMENT: andare    arrivare   cadere      entrare partire      restare   (restate)  rimanere (rimasto)  salire scendere (sceso)  tornare     uscire     venire (venuto) ecc.  C. VERBS EXPRESSING PHYSICAL OR EMOTIONAL CHANGE:  apparire    crescere    dimagrire  diventare ingrassare    invecchiare    morire (morto)  nascere (nato) ecc.   D. REFLEXIVE VERBS:  svegliarsi [= svegliar(e) + si]  ►   mi sono svegliato/a  ci siamo svegliati/e           ti sei svegliato/a    vi siete svegliati/e           si è svegliato/a      si sono svegliati/e    ecc.     33
  • 34. EXPRESSING THE PAST (2): IMPERFETTO   The Imperfetto is a past tense used to indicate habitual or ongoing action in the past. It corresponds to the English used to, would, was + ‐ing.  When to use:  To describe habitual actions in the past. In this case it is often accompanied by expressions like ogni (every), sempre (always), di solito / generalmente (usually), il sabato/ di sabato , la domenica / di domenica, ecc. (every Saturday, every Sunday, etc)     Da piccolo, andavo sempre in vacanza al mare.   As a child, I always used to go on holidays to the beach. (I would always go…)  To describe ongoing parallel actions (actions that were occurring simultaneously). In this case it may be accompanied by mentre (while):    Mentre lui leggeva, io guardavo la TV.   While he was reading, I was watching TV.  To describe an action that was going on when suddenly something else interrupted it. In this case ONLY the ongoing action is expressed in the imperfetto, the interrupting action is expressed in the passato prossimo.    Leggevo quando è squillato il telefono.   I was reading when the phone rang.  Descriptions of people (physical characteristics, age, mood, character), description of places, whether and time of day in the past go in the imperfect:    Avevo sei anni quando ho iniziato la scuola.   I was six when I started school.    Da piccolo avevo le lentiggini   When I was little, I used to have freckles.    La casa dei miei nonni era grande e aveva un bel giardino.   My grandparents’ house was big and had a large garden.    Erano le 6.30 quando siamo arrivati a Roma.   It was 6.30 when we arrived in Rome.    34
  • 35. How to form:  The imperfetto is mostly a regular tense. With all verbs, it is formed by dropping the –re of the infinitive and adding the following endings:    giocare vedere partireio gioca-vo vede-vo parti-voyu gioca-vi vede-vi parti-vilui/lei/Lei gioca-va vede-va parti-vanoi gioca-vamo vede-vamo parti-vamovoi gioca-vate vede-vate parti-vateloro gioca-vano vede-vano parti-vano  Essere in the only truly irregular verb in the imperfetto:    essereio erotu erilui/lei/Lei eranoi eravamovoi eravateloro erano  The following three verbs have an irregular stem:   dire bere fareio dicevo bevevo facevotu dicevi bevevi facevilui/lei/Lei diceva beveva facevanoi dicevamo bevevamo facevamovoi dicevate bevevate facevateloro dicevano bevevano facevano 35
  • 36.         36
  • 37. DIRECT PRONOUNS WITH PASSATO PROSSIMO     When DIRECT pronouns LO – LA – LI – LE are used with the PASSATO PROSSIMO with avere, the past participle must agree with these pronouns (and it ends in the same vowel as the pronoun):   Hai visto Marco     →  Sì, lo ho visto   (more often: l’ho visto)* Hai visto Elena     →  Sì, la ho vista   (more often: l’ho vista)* Hai visto i bambini      →  Sì, li ho visti Hai visto le tue amiche     →  Sì, le ho viste   The agreement with direct pronouns mi – ti – ci – vi  is optional. To avoid mistakes, it is advisable to restrict agreement only to the four pronouns listed above in the examples.  * REMEMBER: The form l’ is used only in the singular.  37
  • 38.   38
  • 39.  THE FUTURE   The future tense is used   to express actions which are going to take place in the future (and of which we are             quite certain);  to express the intention of doing something (plans, promises, etc.);  to make a guess (corresponding to English expressions like: It must be nearly 8            o’clock, He must be at work etc);  to forecast.  The Italian future tense is formed by dropping the final –e of the infinitive and adding the following endings: ‐ò, ‐ai, ‐à, ‐emo, ‐ete, anno.  Verbs which end in –are change the a into e:    LAVORARE SCRIVERE DORMIREio lavorer- ò scriver- ò dormir- òtu lavorer- ai scriver- ai dormir- ailui/lei/Lei lavorer- à scriver- à dormir- ànoi lavorer- emo scriver- emo dormir- emovoi lavorer- ete scriver- ete dormir- eteloro lavorer- anno scriver- anno dormir- anno  As in the present, verbs like giocare, pagare add an H in order to keep the /k/ sound. Verbs like cominciare, mangiare, drop the i:    GIOCARE PAGARE COMINCIARE MANGIAREio giocherò pagherò comincerò mangeròtu giocherai pagherai comincerai mangerailui/lei/Lei giocherà pagherà comincerà mangerànoi giocheremo pagheremo cominceremo mangeremovoi giocherete pagherete comincerete mangereteloro giocheranno pagheranno cominceranno mangeranno  Short (two‐syllable) verbs in ‐are do not change the a into e. And they are very similar to ESSERE:   DARE FARE STARE ESSEREio darò farò starò saròtu darai farai starai sarailui/lei/Lei darà farà starà sarànoi daremo faremo staremo saremovoi darete farete starete sareteloro daranno faranno staranno saranno   39
  • 40. IRREGULAR VERBS: Some verbs – mostly in –ere, stressed on the infinitive ending, such as avEre, potEre, ecc – are irregular in the future: they drop the E:  AVERE DOVERE POTERE VEDERE VOLEREavrò dovrò potrò vedrò vorròavrai dovrai potrai vedrai vorraiavrà dovrà potrà vedrà vorràavremo dovremo potremo vedremo vorremoavrete dovrete potrete vedrete vorreteavranno dovranno potranno vedranno vorranno  ANDARE VENIREandrò verròandrai verraiandrà verràandremo verremoandrete verreteandranno verranno  Note that in Italian we use the future in expressions like:  When he arrives, he’ll be tired:  quando arriverà, sarà stanco.   40