Building health, social and economic capabilities among adolescents threatened by HIV and AIDSThe Siyakha Nentsha program ...
Setting<br />Semi-rural KwaZulu Natal<br />Poverty and income inequality<br />Unemployment<br />Early pregnancy<br />Early...
Formative research: Structural factors ssociatedwith adolescent HIV risk behaviors<br />Residing in relative poverty<br />...
Durban Program Scan<br />Few adolescent SRH or HIV programs address social, economic, and cultural underpinnings of risk b...
Purpose<br />Improve functional capabilities and well-being of adolescents at high risk for:<br />	HIV and STIs		teenage p...
Program Methods<br /> Intervention<br />Evidence-based<br />Piloted<br />Multi-sectoral<br />Participatory<br />Intensive ...
Randomization<br />HIV education, social support + financial literacy<br />HIV education and social support<br />Delayed i...
Research Methods<br />Longitudinal survey <br />FGs & IDIs w <br />   adolescents (F, M), <br />   guardians, teachers, <b...
How powerful do you feel?<br />Males				Females*<br />
Awareness of social grants<br />Males				Females*<br />
Know can get pregnant if you have sex only once<br />Males				Females<br />
Very or somewhat confident know how to use a condom correctly<br />Males				Females<br />
Have drugs or alcohol affected your sexual decision-making in the last 12 months?<br />Males				Females<br />
Participant views of program <br />“It’s different, in school we learn mathematics and biology but here we learn things th...
Participant attitudes on HIV and AIDS<br />“….. I didn’t understand about HIV and AIDS before <br />but now I do. I didn’t...
Moreparticipant quotes about program<br />It is good for young people like me because it teaches about things that happen ...
More work underway<br />More outcomes<br />Gender attitudes<br />Attitudes about sexual violence<br />Aspirations; future ...
Selected resources<br />Hallman, K. 2010, in press. “Social exclusion: The gendering of adolescent HIV risks in KwaZulu-Na...
Thank you! <br />Our funders: ESRC/Hewlett Joint Scheme<br />& DFID via the ABBA RPC<br />
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Building health, social and economic capabilities among adolescents: the Siyakha Nentsha Program in KwaZulu Natal

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May 2010

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Building health, social and economic capabilities among adolescents: the Siyakha Nentsha Program in KwaZulu Natal

  1. 1. Building health, social and economic capabilities among adolescents threatened by HIV and AIDSThe Siyakha Nentsha program in KwaZulu-Natal<br />Kelly Hallman, Eva Roca, Kasthuri Govender, Emmanuel Mbatha, <br />Mike Rogan, Rob Pattman, DeeviaBhana and Hannah Taboada <br />Poverty, Gender and Youth Meeting<br />8June 2010, Accra, Ghana<br />
  2. 2. Setting<br />Semi-rural KwaZulu Natal<br />Poverty and income inequality<br />Unemployment<br />Early pregnancy<br />Early school leaving<br />HIV<br />
  3. 3. Formative research: Structural factors ssociatedwith adolescent HIV risk behaviors<br />Residing in relative poverty<br />Fewer social connections<br />Non-cohesive community<br />Orphanhood<br />Source: Hallman 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2010; Hallman & Roca 2007<br />
  4. 4. Durban Program Scan<br />Few adolescent SRH or HIV programs address social, economic, and cultural underpinnings of risk behaviors<br />Few livelihood programs make conceptual link to health risk behaviors<br />Not context-, age-, culture- or gender-specific<br />Design not evidenced based <br />Delivery weak<br />Little monitoring or evaluation<br />
  5. 5. Purpose<br />Improve functional capabilities and well-being of adolescents at high risk for:<br /> HIV and STIs teenage pregnancy parenthood<br /> school dropout loss of one or both parents<br /> lack of knowledge of further employment and training opportunities<br />
  6. 6. Program Methods<br /> Intervention<br />Evidence-based<br />Piloted<br />Multi-sectoral<br />Participatory<br />Intensive – multi-session<br />Government accredited<br />
  7. 7. Randomization<br />HIV education, social support + financial literacy<br />HIV education and social support<br />Delayed intervention<br />
  8. 8. Research Methods<br />Longitudinal survey <br />FGs & IDIs w <br /> adolescents (F, M), <br /> guardians, teachers, <br /> school principals and program facilitators<br /> to assess experience with intervention<br />
  9. 9. How powerful do you feel?<br />Males Females*<br />
  10. 10. Awareness of social grants<br />Males Females*<br />
  11. 11. Know can get pregnant if you have sex only once<br />Males Females<br />
  12. 12. Very or somewhat confident know how to use a condom correctly<br />Males Females<br />
  13. 13. Have drugs or alcohol affected your sexual decision-making in the last 12 months?<br />Males Females<br />
  14. 14. Participant views of program <br />“It’s different, in school we learn mathematics and biology but here we learn things that we can use in the future.”<br /> - female age 16 <br />
  15. 15. Participant attitudes on HIV and AIDS<br />“….. I didn’t understand about HIV and AIDS before <br />but now I do. I didn’t learn that in school before.” <br />–female age 20 years<br />“It changed my attitude, because I know how to use a condom and I know how to trust my partner and I know how to advise my partner, when we are sitting together and talking about, how to have sexual intercourse and I know even to advise the community as a whole about HIV/AIDS…”–male age 22 years<br />
  16. 16. Moreparticipant quotes about program<br />It is good for young people like me because it teaches about things that happen in real life. <br />I can express my ideas to others. <br />I can plan for my future.<br />Taking steps necessary to pursue my goals.<br />To make a plan and stick to it.<br />Made me realize I had a bright future.<br />What happens now determines my future.<br />I failed this grade but didn’t give up.<br />It builds my self-esteem.<br />I am confident.<br />How important it is to plan for everything you intend to do.<br />I have now decided to study and finish school first, rather than planning for family although I have onebaby already.<br />To be prepared for any challenges or circumstances that may ever come.<br />In order to have a brighter future it starts now and plan what you are going to do with your life.<br />Knowing everything made me become more assertive.<br />I am planning high and also work hard to achieve my goals.<br />
  17. 17. More work underway<br />More outcomes<br />Gender attitudes<br />Attitudes about sexual violence<br />Aspirations; future planning<br />Financial beliefs and behaviors<br />Empowerment and agency<br />Round 3……?<br />Biomarkers…….?<br />
  18. 18. Selected resources<br />Hallman, K. 2010, in press. “Social exclusion: The gendering of adolescent HIV risks in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa,” in J. Klot and V. Nguyen eds., The Fourth Wave: An Assault on Women - Gender, Culture and HIV in the 21st Century. Social Science Research Council and UNESCO.<br />Hallman, K. 2008.“Researching the determinants of vulnerability to HIV amongst adolescents,” IDS Bulletin, 39(5), November 2008.<br />Bruce, J. and Hallman, K. 2008. “Reaching the girls left behind,” Gender & Development, 16(2): 227-245.<br />Hallman, K and Roca, E. 2007. “Reducing the social exclusion of girls,” www.popcouncil.org/pdfs/TABriefs/PGY_Brief27_SocialExclusion.pdf<br />Hallman, K. 2007. “Nonconsensual sex, school enrollment and educational outcomes in South Africa,” Africa Insight (special issue on Youth in Africa), 37(3): 454-472.<br />Hallman, K. Genderedsocioeconomic conditions and HIV riskbehavioursamongyoung people in South Africa. 2005. African Journal of AIDS Research 4(1): 37–50.Abstract: http://www.popcouncil.org/projects/abstracts/AJAR_4_1.html<br />
  19. 19. Thank you! <br />Our funders: ESRC/Hewlett Joint Scheme<br />& DFID via the ABBA RPC<br />

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