UR. IM. 1.0

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UR. IM. 1.0

  1. 1. IM 0.1<br />
  2. 2. Assessment<br />Exam One 20%<br />Short Presentation 10%<br />Long Presentation 20%<br />Exam Two 20%<br />Project 30%<br />
  3. 3. Bartlett and Ghoshal<br />MNC as a company that : makes substantial investment in foreign countries ; actively manages operations in foreign countries ; and regards them as strategic and integral to the organization.<br />
  4. 4. Traditional motivations to invest abroad<br />
  5. 5. Spatial Clusters in the World Economy<br />5<br />
  6. 6. Spatial Clusters in the World Economy<br />6<br />First noticed in Silicon Valley in the United States, in what is now known as the Third Italy, in Southern Germany, and in East Asia<br />Much productive knowledge cannot be codified into explicit forms<br />Rather, communicated via a highly social process of face-to-face interaction over a relatively long period of time<br />Consequently, innovation and learning is a spatially-located, social and collective process among a group of firms<br />
  7. 7. Spatial Clusters in the World Economy<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Spatial Clusters in the World Economy<br />8<br />
  9. 9. Cluster exists within a milieu<br />9<br />
  10. 10. A Value Chain Within a Spatial Cluster<br />10<br />
  11. 11. Spatial Clusters and Milieus<br />11<br />
  12. 12. Spatial Clusters and Milieus<br />12<br />Also it is possible that a MNE can tap into selected foreign clusters and milieus<br />In the local milieu where the (MNE) controls full-fledged operations<br />Can be characterized as an insider<br />Linked to other firms in both formal and informal networks<br />Typically maintains close linkages to local research and education facilities, governmental bodies, etc.<br />Provide channels for rapid dissemination of knowledge and information<br />Provide a basis for co-operation leading to a continuous stream of improvements<br />
  13. 13. Spatial Clusters and Milieus<br />13<br />
  14. 14. Multinational Management: The Local-Global Paradox<br />14<br />Ownership advantages offset the extra costs of doing business internationally<br />
  15. 15. Multinational Management: The Local-Global Paradox<br />15<br />As a firm globalizes its production system it must decide upon<br />Locationof the components of the multinational value network <br />Coordinationamong these components<br />Summarize some issues raised in book Managing Across Borders: The Transnational Solution by Bartlett and Ghoshal (2002)<br />A recurring theme relating to a creative tension between the local and the global—local-global paradox<br />
  16. 16. Strategic challenges faced by MNEs<br />16<br />
  17. 17. Bartlett and Ghoshal2002: “Multinational” Firm<br />17<br />
  18. 18. Bartlett and Ghoshal (2002): Global Firm<br />18<br />
  19. 19. Bartlett and Ghoshal (2002): International Firm<br />19<br />
  20. 20. Bartlett and Ghoshal (2002)<br />20<br />Argue in favor of a transnational model of global management<br />
  21. 21. Bartlett and Ghoshal (2002)<br />21<br />Argue in favor of a transnational model of global management<br />A “flexible centralization/coordination” or an “integrated network” <br />Role of subsidiaries is differentiated throughout the multinational value network, differing among countries<br />One subsidiary might only be involved in sales, while another is involved in R&D<br />Coordination of the multinational value network is achieved using multiple methods<br />Flows of goods are coordinated through centralization<br />Flows of resources are coordinated through formalization<br />Flows of information are coordinated through socialization<br />Bartlett and Ghoshal advocate the rotation of personel throughout the network <br />Disparate elements of the MNE are tied together in a coherent mission through the use of vision and innovative human resource development policies<br />
  22. 22. Bartlett and Ghoshal (2002)<br />22<br />Argue in favor of a transnational model of global management<br />A “flexible centralization/coordination” or an “integrated network” <br />Role of subsidiaries is differentiated throughout the multinational value network, differing among countries<br />One subsidiary might only be involved in sales, while another is involved in R&D<br />Coordination of the multinational value network is achieved using multiple methods<br />Flows of goods are coordinated through centralization<br />Flows of resources are coordinated through formalization<br />Flows of information are coordinated through socialization<br />Bartlett and Ghoshal advocate the rotation of personel throughout the network <br />Disparate elements of the MNE are tied together in a coherent mission through the use of vision and innovative human resource development policies<br />
  23. 23. Bartlett and Ghoshal (2002)<br />23<br />Argue in favor of a transnational model of global management<br />A “flexible centralization/coordination” or an “integrated network” <br />Role of subsidiaries is differentiated throughout the multinational value network, differing among countries<br />One subsidiary might only be involved in sales, while another is involved in R&D<br />Coordination of the multinational value network is achieved using multiple methods<br />Flows of goods are coordinated through centralization<br />Flows of resources are coordinated through formalization<br />Flows of information are coordinated through socialization<br />Bartlett and Ghoshal advocate the rotation of personel throughout the network <br />Disparate elements of the MNE are tied together in a coherent mission through the use of vision and innovative human resource development policies<br />
  24. 24. Examples of Multi-Home-Based MNEs<br />24<br />

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