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2011.04 Marketing Management

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Marketing Management

Marketing Management

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  • 1. Marketing Management
    Stephan Langdon, MBA, M.Ed.
  • 2. Week 4
  • 3. PPT 4-3
    Dimensions of a Market Analysis
    Emerging submarkets
    Actual and potential market and submarket size
    Market and submarket growth
    Market and submarket profitability
    Cost structure
    Distribution systems
    Trends and developments
    Key success factors
  • 4. Emerging Submarkets
    Relevance!
    PPT 4-4
  • 5. Chapter 4 - Market and Submarket Analysis
    PPT 4-5
    Marketing the Wrong Product
    SUV
    Hybrid
  • 6. PPT 4-6
    Customer Decision Process
    Brand Preference
    Brand Relevance
    Determine Brands to Consider
    Select Product Category or Subcategory
    Select Brand to Buy
  • Chapter 4 - Market and Submarket Analysis
    PPT 4-7
    Questions to Help Structure a Market Analysis
    Submarkets
    Are augmented products, emerging niches, trend toward systems, new applications, repositioned product classes, customer trends, or new technologies creating worthwhile submarkets? How should they be defined?
    Size and Growth
    Potentially important submarkets? Size and growth characteristics? Submarkets declining? How fast? Driving forces behind the trends?
    Figure 4.1
  • 11. Chapter 4 - Market and Submarket Analysis
    PPT 4-8
    Questions to Help Structure a Market Analysis
    Profitability
    How intense is the competition among existing firms? Threats from potential entrants and substitute products? Bargaining power of suppliers and customers? Attractive/profitable markets or submarkets?
    Cost Structure
    Major cost and value-added components for various types of competitors?
    Figure 4.1
  • 12. Chapter 4 - Market and Submarket Analysis
    PPT 4-9
    Questions to Help Structure a Market Analysis
    Distribution Systems
    Alternative channels of distribution? How are they changing?
    Market Trends
    Key Success Factors
    Key success factors, assets, and competencies to compete successfully? Can assets and competencies of competitors be neutralized?
    Figure 4.1
  • 13. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-10
    Characteristics of Business Markets
    Fewer, larger buyers
    Close supplier-customer relationships
    Professional purchasing
    Many buying influences
    Multiple sales calls
    Derived demand
    Inelastic demand
    Fluctuating demand
    Geographically concentrated buyers
    Direct purchasing
  • 14. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-11
    Buying Situation
    Straight rebuy
    Modified rebuy
    New task
  • 15. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-12
    Systems Buying and Selling
    Turnkey solution
    desired;
    Bids solicited
    System
    subcomponents
    assembled
    Prime
    Contractors
    Second-tier
    Contractors
  • 16. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-13
    The Buying Center
    Initiators
    Users
    Influencers
    Deciders
    Approvers
    Buyers
    Gatekeepers
  • 17. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-14
    Sales Strategies
    Key Buying
    Influencers
    SmallSellers
    Multilevel
    In-depth
    Selling
    Large Sellers
  • 18. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-15
    Stages in the Buying Process: Buyphases
    Problem recognition
    General need description
    Product specification
    Supplier search
    Proposal solicitation
    Supplier selection
    Order-routine specification
    Performance review
  • 19. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-16
    Table 7.2 Buygrid Framework
  • 20. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-17
    Forms of Electronic Marketplaces
  • Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-18
    Methods of e-Procurement
    Websites organized using vertical hubs
    Websites organized using functional hubs
    Direct extranet links to major suppliers
    Buying alliances
    Company buying sites
  • 27. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-19
    Table 7.3 Vendor Analysis
  • 28. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-20
    Establishing Corporate Trust and Credibility
    Expertise
    Likeability
    Trustworthiness
  • 29. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-21
    Factors Affecting Buyer-Supplier Relationships
    Availability of
    alternatives
    Importance of
    supply
    Supply market
    dynamism
    Complexity of
    supply
  • 30. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 7-22
    Categories of Buyer-Seller Relationships
    Basic buying and selling
    Bare bones
    Contractual transaction
    Customer supply
    Cooperative systems
    Collaborative
    Mutually adaptive
    Customer is king
  • 31. Chapter 4 - Market and Submarket Analysis
    PPT 4-23
    Detecting Maturity and Decline
    Price pressure caused by overcapacity and the lack of product differentiation
    Buyer sophistication and knowledge
    Substitute products or technologies
    Saturation
    No growth sources
    Customer disinterest
  • 32. A group of organizations (i.e., sellers) offering goods or services that are similar and close substitutes for one another
    What’s an industry?
  • 33. Is the market vs. industry distinction important?Why or why not?
  • 34. Does industry attractiveness matter? Why or why not?
  • 35. A Tool for Assessing Industry Attractiveness: Porter’s Five Forces
    Threat of new
    entrants
    Bargaining
    power
    of suppliers
    Bargaining
    power
    of buyers
    Rivalry among
    existing industry
    firms
    Threat of substitute
    products
    Source: Adapted from Michael E. Porter, “Industry Structure and Competitive Strategy: Keys to Profitability,” Financial Analysts Journal, July-August 1980, p. 33.
  • 36. Porter: Win - Lose
    “ The implicit essence of Porter’s theory is that corporate competitiveness play is a “win by some - lose by some” play, where the firms which are competitively agile will alone sustain themselves and grow. In a sense Porter’s theory reflects modern corporate Darwinism where only the fittest would survive.”
  • 37. Sixth Force
  • 38. Downes’ Three new Forces
  • 39. Chapter 4 - Market and Submarket Analysis
    PPT 4-31
    Risks of
    High-Growth
    Market
    Competitive Risk
    • Overcrowding
    • 40. Superior competitive entry
    Firm Limitations
    • Resource constraints
    • 41. Distribution unavailable
    Market Changes
    • Changing KSFs
    • 42. New technology
    • 43. Disappointing growth
    • 44. Price instability
    Figure 4.5
  • 45. Political-Legal Environment
    Increase in
    business legislation
    Growth of special
    interest groups
  • 46. 3-33
    MIS Systems Provide Information on Buyer Preferences and Behavior:Dupont’s Pillow Study
    Pillow Segments
    23% - stackers
    20% - plumpers
    16% - rollers or folders
    16% - cuddlers
    10% - smashers
  • 47. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 3-34
    What is a Marketing Information System (MIS)?
    A marketing information system consists of people, equipment, and procedures to gather, sort, analyze, evaluate, and distribute needed, timely, and accurate information to marketing decision makers.
  • 48. Internal Records and Marketing Intelligence
    Order-to-Payment
    Cycle
    Sales
    Information
    System
    Databases,
    Warehousing,
    Data Mining
    Marketing
    Intelligence
    System
  • 49. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 4-36
    The Measures of Market Demand
    Potential
    Market
    Available
    Market
    Penetrated
    Market
    Target
    Market
  • 50. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 4-37
    Figure 4.4 Ninety Types of Demand Measurement
  • 51. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 4-38
    Figure 4.5 Market Demand Functions
  • 52. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 4-39
    Figure 4.5 Market Demand Functions
  • 53. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 4-40
    Table 4.6 Calculating Brand Development Index
  • 54. 41
    The Conentional Marketing Mix
  • 55. Plus 4 P’s