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Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
Discovering the internet
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Discovering the internet

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PACE University - CIS 101 Discovering the Internet

PACE University - CIS 101 Discovering the Internet

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  • 1. <ul><li>Chapter 1
  • 2. Into the Internet</li></li></ul><li>Objectives<br />Define the Internet<br />Describe how the Internet is used<br />Discuss the history of the Internet and the World Wide Web<br />Describe how individuals and businesses connect to the Internet<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />2<br />
  • 3. Defining the Internet<br />The Internet is a worldwide network of computers that allows individual and business users to share information and other resources<br />The Internet is an interconnected network of networks where each host has a number of other computers connected to it<br />Users who connect to the Internet to access information are online<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />3<br />
  • 4. Defining the Internet<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />4<br />
  • 5. Using the Internet<br /><ul><li>The Internet has profoundly changed nearly every aspect of life by revolutionizing how:
  • 6. People access information for personal and business use
  • 7. Individual shoppers or commercial buyers purchase products and services
  • 8. Students do their school work
  • 9. People communicate with friends, family, colleagues, and others
  • 10. Businesses interact with their customers, vendors, and business partners</li></ul>Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />5<br />
  • 11. Using the Internet<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />6<br />
  • 12. Using the Internet<br />Who Uses the Internet?<br />Students<br />Businesspeople<br />Professionals<br />Homemakers<br />Retirees<br />Hobbyists<br />Consumers<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />7<br />
  • 13. Using the Internet<br /><ul><li>Internet Activities
  • 14. Browsing and searching for information on the World Wide Web
  • 15. Communicating with others through e-mail, chat, instant messaging, Web-based discussion groups, newsgroups, mailing lists, blogs, and other social media
  • 16. Downloading and uploading files
  • 17. Logging on to remote computers
  • 18. Conducting business activities</li></ul>Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />8<br />
  • 19. Using the Internet<br />Internet Activities – The World Wide Web<br />Web pages – created using HTML or Web authoring software and connected by hyperlinks<br />Web site – collection of related Web pages<br />College, university, corporate, retail, non-profit, personal<br />Web server – computer on which Web pages are stored<br />Web browser – software used to view Web pages<br />Used to browse or "surf" the Web<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />9<br />
  • 20. Using the Internet<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />10<br />
  • 21. Using the Internet<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />11<br />
  • 22. Using the Internet<br />Internet Activities (cont'd)<br />Search tools<br />Web-based resource to help find specific information on the Web<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />12<br />
  • 23. Using the Internet<br />Internet Activities (cont'd)<br />E-mail – users send and receive text with or without attached files<br />Instant messaging (IM) – two or more users take turns exchanging brief messages<br />Internet Relay Chat (IRC) or chatting – users type text into a chat window; all users can see what other users type<br />Newsgroups and mailing lists – users subscribe to a newsgroup discussion or mailing list on a certain topic and receive messages about that topic<br />Social media – users share information, photos, links, and personal commentary using a variety of online tools<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />13<br />
  • 24. Using the Internet<br />Internet Activities (cont'd)<br />Downloading and uploading files – using FTP to send or retrieve electronic files from a server<br />Music, video, data<br />Logging on to a remote computer – using Telnet to log on to a remote computer to use its processing power<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />14<br />
  • 25. Using the Internet<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />15<br />
  • 26. Using the Internet<br />Internet Activities (cont'd)<br />Conducting business activities<br />E-commerce<br />E-business models<br />B2C<br />B2B<br />B2E<br />C2C<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />16<br />
  • 27. History of the Internet<br />Origins in ARPANET<br />Department of Defense founded ARPA to promote computer and scientific research<br />J.C.R. Licklider headed computer and information research<br />Leonard Kleinrock developed packet switching<br />ARPANET – prototype network connecting ARPA and university research centers<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />17<br />
  • 28. History of the Internet<br /><ul><li>Growth and Development of ARPANET
  • 29. Ray Tomlinson developed e-mail (1971)
  • 30. Vinton Cerf and Robert Kahn developed standard or protocol for communications over a network TCP and IP (1972)
  • 31. Beyond Research, to the Public
  • 32. NSFnet replaced ARPANET (1985)
  • 33. Congress authorized commercial activity on the NSFnet (1992)
  • 34. NSFnet moved connections to commercial network providers (1995)</li></ul>Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />18<br />
  • 35. History of the Internet<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />19<br />The Beginnings and Rise of the Web<br />Gopher at University of Minnesota<br />Directory-based system<br />Made it easier to find documents on Internet-connected servers<br />
  • 36. History of the Internet<br />The Beginnings and Rise of the Web (cont'd)<br />Tim Berners-Lee (1991)<br />Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)<br />Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)<br />First Web browser and Web server<br />Marc Andreessen and Eric Bina (1993)<br />Mosaic browser<br />Marc Andreessen and Jim Clark (1994)<br />Netscape Navigator browser<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />20<br />
  • 37. History of the Internet<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />21<br />
  • 38. History of the Internet<br />The Beginnings and Rise of the Web (cont'd)<br />New research networks<br />Internet2 (I2)<br />CANARIE<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />22<br />
  • 39. Connecting to the Internet<br />Internet Service Providers (ISPs)<br />Provide access to the Internet<br />Considerations for choosing an ISP<br />The speed or bandwidth of the connection<br />The type of connection and cost of service<br />Availability of customer service and technical support<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />23<br />
  • 40. Connecting to the Internet<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />24<br />
  • 41. Connecting to the Internet<br />Connection Methods<br />Dial-up access<br />Computer uses standard telephone lines and a modem to access the Internet<br />Mostly home users<br />Two types:<br />Regular dial-up<br />High-speed dial-up<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />25<br />
  • 42. Connecting to the Internet<br />Connection Methods (cont'd)<br />Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)<br />An “always on” high-speed Internet connection over standard telephone lines<br />Broadband transmission splitting telephone wire into data and voice<br />Requires firewall protection to prevent intrusion by outsiders<br />Home<br />Businesses<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />26<br />
  • 43. Connecting to the Internet<br />Connection Methods (cont'd)<br />Cable<br />An “always on” high-speed Internet connection over cable TV lines<br />Cable modem and line splitter required<br />Firewall protection needed<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />27<br />
  • 44. Connecting to the Internet<br />Connection Methods (cont'd)<br />Fixed wireless connections<br />Microwave<br />Line-of-sight transmission<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />28<br />
  • 45. Connecting to the Internet<br />Connection Methods (cont'd)<br />Fixed wireless connections (cont'd)<br />One way or two way satellite transmissions<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />29<br />
  • 46. Connecting to the Internet<br /><ul><li>Connection Methods (cont'd)
  • 47. Mobile Wireless
  • 48. Wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi) technologies to connect to networks
  • 49. Wireless access point – hardware that connects wireless devices to a network
  • 50. Hotspot – specific geographic location in which a wireless access point provides public Internet access</li></ul>Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />30<br />
  • 51. Connecting to the Internet<br />Connection Methods (cont'd)<br />Mobile Broadband (cont'd)<br />GSM/GPRS card installed in a computer to allow it to connect to a wireless network<br />Cell phones, smartphones, or PDAs can connect to the Internet<br />High-Speed Business Connections<br />Businesses typically use high-speed fiber-optic cable such as a T1 line connected to their local area network to provide Internet access to employees<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />31<br />
  • 52. Connecting to the Internet<br />Chapter 1: Into the Internet<br />32<br />
  • 53. <ul><li>Chapter 1
  • 54. Complete</li>

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