• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Trends in civil society and engagement
 

Trends in civil society and engagement

on

  • 901 views

Bobby Duffy (Twitter: @BobbyIpsosMORI) is Director of the global Ipsos Social Research Institute and is also a Visiting Senior Fellow, King’s College London

Bobby Duffy (Twitter: @BobbyIpsosMORI) is Director of the global Ipsos Social Research Institute and is also a Visiting Senior Fellow, King’s College London

Statistics

Views

Total Views
901
Views on SlideShare
769
Embed Views
132

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0

3 Embeds 132

http://www.pinterest.com 117
https://twitter.com 14
http://pinterest.com 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Trends in civil society and engagement Trends in civil society and engagement Presentation Transcript

    • Paste co- brand logo here Version 1 | PublicTrends in Civil Society and EngagementBobby DuffyDirector Ipsos Social Research Institute, April 2013Visiting Senior Fellow, King’s College London© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • One key issue...What do you see as the most/other important issues facing Britain today? Brown becomes Cameron becomes PM PM 70 The economy 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 May May May May May May May May May May May May May May May May 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • We’re shaken...Thinking about the economic downturn, which of these statements comesclosest to your view? Even though the Dont know recession has been 13% tough, Britain will be stronger when it gets through it 31% The recession has been so tough that Britain will be 56% weaker because of it for years to comeBase: 1,009 online British adults aged 16-75, 9-11 November 2012 Source: Ipsos MORI/RSA© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • We are in a group of European countries feelinghardest hit by the last five years Net last five years good for country Brazil 40% R² = 0.49 Saudi Arabia 20% India Sweden Canada Australia Indonesia 0% Germany -40% -30% -20%Turkey -10% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Argentina RussiaNet disagree Net agree -20%country will Mexico Poland country willnever be the South Africa Belgium never be thesame again South Korea same again Japan -40% France US -60% GB Italy -80% Spain Hungary Net last five years bad for countryBase: 17,678 online interviews with adults aged 16/18-64 in 23 countries, September 4-18 2012 Source: Ipsos Global @dvisor© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • But cuts haven’t really hit perceptions of services....On balance, based on your personal experience, do you think the following publicservices have got better or worse over the past 12 months or have they stayed thesame? 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Primary education 6 18 49 17 3 7 Refuse collection 3 12 64 14 5 2 NHS GP 5 13 56 16 8 2 NHS Hospitals 4 13 47 20 11 5 Secondary education 1 9 59 19 6 6 Public transport 3 10 52 22 9 4 The police 3 9 41 18 19 10 Much better A little better Stayed the same A little worse Much worse Dont know/cant sayBase: Online British adults aged 16-75 who are users of each service (n in brackets), 9-11 November 2012 Source: Ipsos MORI/RSA© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Little awareness of progress with cuts...What proportion of the government’s planned cuts to public spending do you thinkhave been carried out so far? 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 100% * 90-99% * 80-89% 1 70-79% 2 60-69% 6 50-59% 40-49% 9 10 Mean: 30-39% 13 20-29% 10 40% 10-19% 8 1-9% 3 0% 1 Dont know 38Base: 1,009 online British adults aged 16-75, 9-11 November 2012 Source: Ipsos MORI/RSA© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • A new reality – where we expect our children to have alower quality of life than usWhen they reach your age, do you think your children will have a higher or lower quality of lifethan you, or about the same? % Higher % Lower November 2011 23 42 35 April 2003 43 45 12Base: 1,006 British adults aged 18+, 19th-21st November 2011 Source: Ipsos MORI© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Trust androle ofgovernment© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Some measures of trust are not that different – or on the up...Trust in institutions (How much do you trust...) Parliament Local Council 70 65 62 64 60 61 60 57 52 54 50Per cent 40 36 38 37 36 35 34 34 29 30 20 10 0 2001 2003 2005 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2012 Base: Core sample in England, (2001: 9,430, 2003: 8,920, 2005: 9,195, 2007-08: 8,804, 2008-09: 8,768, 2009-10: 8,712, Source: Ipsos MORI/DCLG, Citizenship Survey, 2010-11: 10,307) 2012 from Community Life Survey © Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Trust in civil servants vs politicians – why have views diverged somuch?...would you tell me if you generally trust them to tell the truth, or not? Civil Servants Government Ministers Politicians Generally 60 50 Charities higher – 6.6/10 compared with 4.8 councils 40 30 20 10 0 Source: Ipsos MORI most years face-to-face in-home, *2012 ICM telephone ** 2013Base: c.1,000-2,000 IM telephone© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • But more specific trust question shows seriousdeclineHow much do you trust a British government of any party to place the needs of thiscountry above the interests of their own political party? 40 % “almost never” 30% 20 10 0 Source: British Social Attitudes, 1986-2009© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Paste co- brand logo here Version 1 | PublicSignificant generationaldifferences© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Our generational balance is changing fundamentally –four roughly equal-sized and very different generations...Proportion of UK adult (18+) population from each generational grouping 100% 90% % Pre war generation 80% 70% 60% 50% % Baby boomers 40% 30% 20% % Generation X 10% % Generation Y 0% 83 84 85 86 87 89 90 91 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Source: Eurostat© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Attachment to political parties is declining – maybe not by asmuch as expect...?Do you think of yourself as a supporter of any one political party? 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 83 84 85 86 87 89 90 91 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10Base: All data points represent >200 responses Source: British Social Attitudes© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • ...driven by solid generational patternDo you think of yourself as a supporter of any one political party? 70% 60% 50%% ‘yes’ 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 83 84 85 86 87 89 90 91 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Pre war Baby boomers Generation x Generation yEach sample point represents >100 respondents BSA. Population data from Eurostat© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • International comparisons are very interesting –Sweden has very different pattern...Do you feel closer to a particular party than all other parties? 100% 90% % Ja 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 Pre War Baby Boomer Generation X Generation Y Overall Source: European Social Survey© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • ...compared with UKDo you feel closer to a particular party than all other parties?100% 90% % Yes 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 Pre War Baby Boomer Generation X Generation Y Overall Source: European Social Survey© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Declining support for more welfare spending...“the government should spend more money on welfare benefits for the poor,even if it leads to higher taxes” 70% 60% Agree total 50% 55% 39% 40% 30% 22% 28% 20% 10% Disagree total 0% 1987 1989 1991 1993 1994 1995 1996 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011Each sample point represents >100 respondents BSA. Population data from Eurostat© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Generations are very different...“the government should spend more money on welfare benefits for the poor,even if it leads to higher taxes” 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1987 1989 1991 1993 1994 1995 1996 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Pre war (before 1945) Baby boomers (1945-1965) Generation x (1966-1979) Generation y (1980-2000)Each sample point represents >100 respondents BSA. Population data from Eurostat© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • “Benefits for unemployed people are too low and causehardship” - % agree 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 83 84 85 86 87 89 90 91 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 Pre war (born before 1945) Baby Boomers (born 1945-65) Generation X (born 1966-1979) Generation Y (born 1980-) Overall: Source: BSA/NatCen. All data points represent>200 responses© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Pre-1945 generation have a consistently different, more positiveview of the NHSHow satisfied or dissatisfied would you say you are with the way in which the NationalHealth Service runs nowadays? 90% Total % Satisfied 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 83 84 86 87 89 90 91 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Pre War (born before 1945) Baby Boomers (born 1945-1965) Generation X (born 1966-1979) Generation Y (born 1980 onwards)All data points represent > 200 responses Source: British Social Attitudes© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Younger generations pretty detached from welfare state overall“How much do you agree or disagree that … the creation of the welfare stateis one of Britains proudest achievements.” 80% % % Agree/Strongly agree 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% @BobbyIpsosMORI www.ipsos-mori-generations.com 0% 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Pre war (before 1945) Baby boomers (1945-65) Generation x (1966-1979) Generation y (1980-2000)All data points represent > 200 responses Source: British Social Attitudes© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • A “hump” in giving... Mind the Gap, CAF Sept 2012All data points represent > 200 responses Source: British Social Attitudes© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Seen in generational pattern...All data points represent > 200 responses Source: British Social Attitudes© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public Mind the Gap, CAF Sept 2012
    • Three quickobservations...1. Bigdifferencesbetween groups© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Iron-clad relationship between voluntary activity anddeprivation... % of England respondents 65 60 55 Informal volunteering 50 in last 12 months R² = 0.94 45 40 35 Formal volunteering in last 12 months 30 R² = 0.95 25 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Least deprived Most deprived IMD Deciles (England) England c.8,700 adults aged 16+ (Citizenship Study 2009/10)© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • 2. Involvement≠ happiness© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • There are lots of unhappy involved people… Involved in decision-making bodies on local issues Yes No 15% 85% 6% 9% NOT a happy group… CAN CANNOT - half the level of satisfaction influence influence with council, half as likely to decisions decisions feel informed, half as likely to think views sought… Source: Place Survey 2008/9© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • 3. Civil societyorganisationshave strengthsand weaknesses© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Charities and not for profits are more top-of-mind formore emotive service attributes…Some charities and some private companies receive funding from government to provide certain publicservices, such as healthcare services, care for the elderly, services for disabled people etc. Other publicservices are provided directly by public authorities such as the NHS or local councils. Of these threetypes of service provider, which one do you think would be BEST at… % Charities / NFP orgs % Private companies % Public authorities % Dont know Understanding what service users need 37 16 30 17 Providing a caring and compassionate 53 11 18 17 serviceBase: 1,001 British adults, 20-26 November 2009 Source: Ipsos MORI© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • …attitudes to best provider for quality of service aremore mixed…Some charities and some private companies receive funding from government to provide certain publicservices, such as healthcare services, care for the elderly, services for disabled people etc. Other publicservices are provided directly by public authorities such as the NHS or local councils. Of these threetypes of service provider, which one do you think would be BEST at… % Charities / NFP orgs % Private companies % Public authorities % Dont know Providing a professional and reliable 21 29 30 19 service Providing the best quality of service for the 29 27 25 20 moneyBase: 1,001 British adults, 20-26 November 2009 Source: Ipsos MORI© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • …and public sector seen as most able to decide prioritiesSome charities and some private companies receive funding from government to provide certain publicservices, such as healthcare services, care for the elderly, services for disabled people etc. Other publicservices are provided directly by public authorities such as the NHS or local councils. Of these threetypes of service provider, which one do you think would be BEST at… % Charities / NFP orgs % Private companies % Public authorities % Dont know Deciding exactly what type of service 25 16 39 20 should be provided Uniformity as shorthand for fairness?Base: 1,001 British adults, 20-26 November 2009 Source: Ipsos MORI© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Two nightmare scenarios...© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • 70% of charitable organisations do not perceive any influencefrom local statutory bodies ....Taking everything into account, overall, how do the statutory bodies in your localarea influence your organisation’s success? 51% 19% 15% 9% 5% 1% Very Positive Neither Negative Very Don’t positive influence positive influence negative know / No influence nor influence answer negative influenceBase: 48,939 charities and social enterprises in 149 Upper Tier English Local Authorities, Sep – Dec 2008 Source: Ipsos MORI / OCS NSCSEwww.nationalscse.com Survey conducted as NSTSO autumn 2008 – next wave autumn 2010 as NSCSE© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Conclusions• Shaken security, huge concern for future• But not led to greater collective feeling or action• Slow aggregate decline masks bigger shifts between generations• Context grew up in hugely important – generational patterns often significant• Huge variation in capacity by deprivation/disadvantage• Involvement often doesn’t lead to happiness/fulfilment• Civil society organisations have high trust/compassion, but statutory should still decide• Links between seem very limited, but is that an issue?© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
    • Paste co- brand logo here Version 1 | PublicThank youBobby DuffyDirector Ipsos Social Research Institute, November 2012Visiting Senior Fellow, King’s College London© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public