Personalisation Versus Privacy

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These slides were presented at the Personalisation versus privacy event held by Ipsos MORI and King's college London, 11th February 2014. Full poll: …

These slides were presented at the Personalisation versus privacy event held by Ipsos MORI and King's college London, 11th February 2014. Full poll: http://www.ipsos-mori.com/researchpublications/researcharchive/3342/Three-in-four-Britons-are-worried-about-companies-collecting-information-about-them.aspx

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  • 1. Personalisation versus privacy Bobby Duffy Director, Ipsos MORI Social Research Institute, Visiting Senior Fellow, King’s College London © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London #KingsIpsosMORI
  • 2. Not new area of study, but still an emergent issue… “Data and information sovereignty is the next big consumer issue” Demos 2012 “Far from being a quaint 20th Century idea… the latent demand for privacy has never been greater” Deloitte Data Nation 2013 “Personal data represents an emerging asset class, potentially every bit as valuable as other assets such as traded goods, gold or oil” World Economic Forum 2012 “All are endorsing that key data should be released back to consumers… This is the way the world is going and the UK is currently leading the charge.” Launch of midata initiative © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 3. What previous studies have told us… • 70-90% concerned with use of their (online) information… • But it’s not uniform - segments of population: Privacy unconcerned Privacy fundamentalists 10% Enthusiastic sharers 8% Value hunters 26% 19% 20% 64% Pragmatists Non-sharers 30% 22% Sceptics Privacy pragmatists • Depends on situation, and is moderated by trust: and trust encouraged by previous experience, brand and transparency Source: Westin 1991 and Harris Interactive 2003, and Demos 2012 © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 4. Whatever you do… If you found out a company you Failing safe or losing my personal data Failing to keepto keep safe or losing my are a customer personal data with was doing Selling anonymousanonymous data to other Selling data about customers about any of the companies customers to other companies following, which if any, would Exploiting overseas workers Exploiting overseas workers make you seriously Charging higher prices than Charging higher prices than competitors consider not competitors using this company Damaging the environment Damaging the environment again? Paying senior executives a large bonus/salary Paying senior executives a large bonus/salary Base: 1,036 British adults 15+, 30 March – 5 April 2012 © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London 70% 56% 53% 51% 49% 40% Source: Deloitte/Ipsos MORI
  • 5. New international study… © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 6. The survey • 20 countries* • Using Ipsos’ Global @dvisor online panel: representative of more affluent, connected population in developing countries • Only includes those aged 16-64, 16,000 interviews in total, fieldwork October 1st and October 15th 2013 *Some questions not asked in China © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 7. Overall trade-off on online privacy/personalisation – clear hierarchy between countries… Which comes closest to your own opinion… A. I am happy sharing information about online activities so that I get personalised services/relevant recommendations B. I would rather keep information and online activities private even if I do not get personalised services and relevant recommendations Agree more with: A B 1 India 46% 29% 2 Brazil 44% 32% 3 China 38% 24% 4 Italy 37% 46% 5 Russia 33% 41% T Total 26% 52% 6 the US 25% 57% 7 Great Britain 23% 62% 8 Spain 23% 62% 9 Canada 21% 59% 10 Australia 20% 60% 11 Germany 19% 60% 12 France 19% 68% 13 Sweden 11% 69% Base: 16,167 adults across 20 countries (1,000 GB), online, 1-15 October 2013, data is weighted. © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London Source: Ipsos Global Trends Survey
  • 8. Number of other hierarchies in concerns… © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 9. How information used – benefits and safeguards Don’t mind/am comfortable/happy with companies… 70% using information about I don't mind companies using information me such as my location about me provided automatically when I go online such and what Iand what been as my location have I have been browsing online browsing 60% 50% 40% making profits from using I am comfortable providing information about myself to companies who are online in return information about me if it for personalised services and products benefits me too using information I don't mindcollected about me as companies using information collected aboutas it's anonymised long me as long as it's anonymised and can't be linked back to me and can't be linked back to me 30% 20% 10% 0% Base: 16,167 adults across 20 countries (1,000 GB), online, 1-15 October 2013, data is weighted. © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London Source: Ipsos Global Trends Survey
  • 10. Hierarchy in type of information and activities We are now % Happy for information to be used going to show you some 30% …recommending products A website recommending products you might different based on your past purchases be interested in based on your past purchases 29% scenarios about how …making recommendations 32% A is informationwebsite making recommendations about based on things you have products you might be interested in based on used… looked at on their site things you have looked at on their site 31% a website… …making recommendations A website making recommendations about based on things based on products you might be interested inyou have looked at on other websites things you have looked at on otherwebsites 24% 14% …making recommendations A website making recommendations about based on the location of your products you might be interested in based on Global mobile phone/you Total the location of your mobile phone/you 17% 12% Great Britain Base: 16,167 adults across 20 countries (1,000 GB), online, 1-15 October 2013, data is weighted. © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London Source: Ipsos Global Trends Survey
  • 11. Hierarchy in types of organisation… To what extent, if at all, do you personally trust the following to use the information they have about you in the right way? % Great deal / Fair amount Public sector healthcare providers 45% 41% Banks 45% 32% 31% Supermarkets 38% Private sector healthcare providers 28% 31% Credit card companies 24% 31% Insurance companies 17% 25% Telecommunications companies Media companies Foreign governments Base: 16,167 adults across 20 countries (1,000 GB), online, 1-15 October 2013, data is weighted. © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London 33% 31% Your national government Social media sites Global Total Great Britain 34% 17% 20% 12% 19% 11% 15% 10% Source: Ipsos Global Trends Survey
  • 12. But no one view – and number of contradictions… © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 13. Inconsistency in stated attitudes – many quite explainable… 34% of those who say comfortable providing information for recommendations have been irritated by recommendations… 38% of those who say not concerned about privacy online say they do mind companies using information about them… 71% of those who are happy to share personal information with companies and brands that they like are concerned about how information collected about them is being used by companies © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 14. Contradictions between attitudes and what we do… …nearly half say willing to pay for extra privacy… I am willing to pay extra for a service or product to keep my details private Total 45% 46% Great Britain 34% 52% Agree Disagree Base: 16,167 adults across 20 countries (1,000 GB), online, 1-15 October 2013, data is weighted. © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London Source: Ipsos Global Trends Survey
  • 15. …but less than a quarter have increased the privacy settings on their computer… Increased privacy settings on browser In Britain, 74% of those who say willing to pay haven’t increased their privacy settings Total 23% 77% Great Britain 23% 77% Agree Disagree Base: 16,167 adults across 20 countries (1,000 GB), online, 1-15 October 2013, data is weighted. © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London Source: Ipsos Global Trends Survey
  • 16. How many really fully read terms and conditions? I often don't bother fully reading terms and conditions on a website before accepting them 1 Canada 71% 26% 2 Australia 69% 26% 3 Great Britain 67% 28% 4 Italy 67% 29% 5 China 66% 28% 6 France 66% 32% T Total 63% 33% 7 the US 62% 34% 8 Germany 59% 37% 9 Russia 58% 38% 10 Sweden 57% 36% 11 Spain 55% 41% 12 Brazil 53% 40% 13 India 53% 43% Agree Disagree Base: 16,167 adults across 20 countries (1,000 GB), online, 1-15 October 2013, data is weighted. © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London Source: Ipsos Global Trends Survey
  • 17. Evidence suggests otherwise… $1000 reward in EULA: 3000 downloads and 4 months before first person claimed (0.03%) “Immortal soul clause”: 88% signed up © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 18. Is it any wonder? “Would rather read… 58% 12% Source: Which, 2012; Skandia, 2011 © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 19. Concerns about surveillance sets a tone… …although only 20% say it’s a top reason for increased privacy concerns © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 20. Trying to unpick views of government surveillance… 0 - completely unacceptable Four types of activity 1 2 3 Two scenarios A real/immediate threat of terrorist attack Combat crime 4 5 6 7 8 Two target groups © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London You personally Anyone (impersonal) 9 10 - completely acceptable
  • 21. Looking first at CRIME… Please indicate how acceptable or not you would find it if the government in COUNTRY was allowed to do the following things to combat crime without their/your consent? Monitor…. % saying completely unacceptable Anyone’s Your Phone calls 47% Phone calls 41% Texts 46% Texts 40% Email 45% Email 39% Internet 41% Internet 37% Global Total Great Britain Base: 1,001 GB Adults, online, 1-15 October 2013, data is weighted. © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London 45% 41% 45% 41% 46% 40% 40% 35% Source: Ipsos Global Trends Survey
  • 22. When asking about a TERRORIST THREAT… Please indicate how acceptable or not you would find it if the government in COUNTRY was allowed to do the following things to deal with a real and immediate threat of a terrorist attack without their/your consent? Monitor… % saying completely unacceptable Phone calls 51% Phone calls 39% Texts 51% Texts Email Internet Global Total Great Britain Base: 1,001 GB Adults, online, 1-15 October 2013, data is weighted. © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London Anyone’s Your 39% 38% 36% 49% Email 44% Internet 24% 18% 24% 18% 25% 18% 22% 18% Source: Ipsos Global Trends Survey
  • 23. Conclusions “…people are fearful of sharing their data largely because companies and government haven’t been good at clearly explaining how they use it.” The Data Dialogue, Demos 2012 Suspicion and concern high, knowledge and action low – and concern increases for many as told more: transparency needs to increase, but weak incentive to be first mover, and unpredictable implications for trust “When asked, we tend not to want our personal information to be used and manipulated without our consent, the chance to correct it or to limit its accessibility; yet every day we make decisions and choices that suggest we ultimately don’t care or know enough.” Demos 2008 Smart defaults – use what we know about people to default into more appropriate options (incl. “personalising privacy”) – will concern some… More positively… © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London
  • 24. People see the potential in “smart disclosure”… I would like to have access to the data that companies hold Total about me, as it could really help me make better decisions – for example about how I spend my Great Britain money 71% 22% 74% 17% Agree Disagree Base: 16,167 adults across 20 countries (1,000 GB), online, 1-15 October 2013, data is weighted. © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London Source: Ipsos Global Trends Survey
  • 25. Thank you bobby.duffy@ipsos.com @BobbyIpsosMORI © Ipsos MORI / King’s College London