Ipsos MORI research on public attitudes to the UK’s energy challenges
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Ipsos MORI research on public attitudes to the UK’s energy challenges

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The British public are now far more concerned by energy security than climate change compared with people around the world. There is recognition we need a diverse mix of energy sources to meet needs, ...

The British public are now far more concerned by energy security than climate change compared with people around the world. There is recognition we need a diverse mix of energy sources to meet needs, including support for nuclear. However, consumers themselves are still wedded to gas, and have limited awareness of alternative options. Ben Page gave this presentation to Madano Partnership's breakfast briefing on the UK’s evolving energy policy: Opportunties and Challenges on 25 April 2013.

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    Ipsos MORI research on public attitudes to the UK’s energy challenges Ipsos MORI research on public attitudes to the UK’s energy challenges Presentation Transcript

    • © Ipsos MORIVersion 1 | PublicPublic attitudes to the UK’s energy challenges,and the role for consumers and businessesIpsos MORI
    • © Ipsos MORIHow concerned are the publicabout energy security andaffordability of supply?
    • © Ipsos MORI585650505042393636353533302827272523231912874SwedenGermanyGreat BritainJapanUSASouth KoreaAustraliaSouth AfricaSpainBelgiumItalyCanadaPolandFranceChinaTurkeyHungaryArgentinaIndonesiaSaudiArabiaIndiaMexicoRussiaBrazilBase: Between 500-1010 respondents per country, February 2 - 14 2011Q. What are the three most important environmental issues in your country?% Future energy sources and suppliesSource: Ipsos Global @dvisorBrits care much more than most about energy security
    • © Ipsos MORI56554844424240403834333029282727272525252321199South KoreaIndiaJapanMexicoBrazilIndonesiaCanadaSpainGermanyArgentinaTurkeyAustraliaFranceSwedenBelgiumItalyUSAGreat BritainHungarySaudiArabiaSouth AfricaChinaPolandRussiaBase: Between 500-1010 respondents per country, February 2 - 14 2011Source: Ipsos Global @dvisorBut Britain is less concerned than others about climatechangeQ. What are the three most important environmental issues in your country?% Global warming / climate change
    • © Ipsos MORIThe public are concerned about security of supply andaffordabilityBase:1,822 British adults, aged 15 and over, 6th January-26 March 2010Electricity will becomeunaffordableSupplies of fossil fuels (e.g.coal and gas) will run outThe UK will become toodependent on energy fromother countries% Not at all concerned% Not very concerned% Fairly concerned% Very concerned% Dont know/no opinionQ. How concerned, if at all, are you that in the future…Source: Cardiff University / Ipsos MORI78%81%78%
    • © Ipsos MORIHow acceptable are renewablesand nuclear as a way ofmeeting the UK’s energyneeds?
    • © Ipsos MORI0%10%20%30%40%50%Aug98Feb99Sep99Apr00Dec00July01Dec02Dec03Dec04Nov05Nov06Nov07Nov08Nov09Nov10Jun11Dec11Dec12Q. How favourable or unfavourable are your overall opinions or impressions ofthe nuclear industry/nuclear energy?Favourable opinion of the nuclear industry has slipped, thoughthere is no growth in unfavourable opinionFavourable Unfavourable40%17%Base: All GB adults aged 16+ (1,000 – 2,000)24%28%40%19%35%18%Source: NIA / Ipsos MORI
    • © Ipsos MORI0%10%20%30%40%50%60%Support OpposeQ. To what extent would you support or oppose the building of new nuclearpower stations in Britain TO REPLACE those that are being phased outover the next few years? This would ensure the previous proportion ofnuclear energy is retained i.e. 18%.Support for replacement nuclear newbuild slips, thoughpositive balance continues* Wording in 2001 was “To what extent would you support or opposethe building of new nuclear power stations in Britain?”19%47%36%28%50%20%20%42%# Wording up to 2011 was “This would ensure the current proportionof nuclear energy is retained i.e. 18%”Source: NIA / Ipsos MORIBase: All GB adults aged 16+ (1,000 – 2,000)
    • © Ipsos MORIQ. To what extent would you support or oppose the building of new nuclearpower stations in Britain TO REPLACE those that are being phased outover the next few years? This would ensure the previous proportion ofnuclear energy is retained i.e. 18%.-100102030402002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011(June)2011(Dec)2012(Dec)Net support for newbuildNet support for nuclear newbuild below its peak+8+29Fukushima+9+5-10+30+22Source: NIA / Ipsos MORIBase: All GB adults aged 16+ (1,000 – 2,000)
    • © Ipsos MORIThe public favour renewables over fossil fuels andnuclearBase: 1,822 British adults, aged 15 and over, 6th January-26th March 2010Q. How favourable or unfavourable are your current overall opinions orimpressions of the following sources for producing electricity...?Sun / solar powerWindHydroelectricBiomassGasCoalNuclearSource: Cardiff University / Ipsos MORIOil% favourable
    • © Ipsos MORIQ. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?Base: 1,822 British adults, aged 15 and over, 6th January-26th March 2010;1,491 British adults, aged 15 and over, 1st October – 6th November 2005Source: Cardiff University / Ipsos MORI% Strongly agree % Tend to agree % Neither / nor% Tend to disagree % Strongly disagree % Dont know / no opinion20052010Britain needs a mix ofenergy sources toensure a reliablesupply of electricity,including nuclearpower and renewableenergy sourcesHowever, there is acceptance of need for diverse energymix74%63%
    • © Ipsos MORIQ. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?Base: 1,822 British adults, aged 15 and over, 6th January-26th March 2010;1,491 British adults, aged 15 and over, 1st October – 6th November 2005Source: Cardiff University / Ipsos MORI% Strongly agree % Tend to agree % Neither / nor% Tend to disagree % Strongly disagree % Dont know / no opinion20052010We need nuclearpower becauserenewable energysources alone are notable to meet ourelectricity needs… And this mix needs to include nuclear55%48%
    • © Ipsos MORIThere is some willingness to pay more for renewable energybut less so for nuclear powerYour electricity comesprimarily fromrenewables?313436Your electricity comesprimarily from nuclearpower?721811Base: 1,822 British adults aged 15 and over, 6th-January-26th March 2010Q. Considering your current electricity bills, by how much, if at all, wouldyou be willing to increase the amount that you pay per month in order toensure that:Source: Cardiff University / Ipsos MORI£0£0£2- £8£2- £8£10 andover£10 andover
    • © Ipsos MORIQ. To what extent would you support or oppose the followingdevelopments in your area? (By area we mean up to approximately 5miles from your home)But Not in My Backyard, for both nuclear and coalBase: 1,822 British adults aged 15 and over, 6th January-26th March 2010The building of a newnuclear power stationThe building of a new coalpower station% Strongly support % Tend to support % Neither support nor oppose% Tend to oppose % Strongly oppose % Dont know/ No opinionSource: Cardiff University / Ipsos MORI21%24% 60%59%
    • © Ipsos MORIQ. To what extent would you support or oppose the followingdevelopments in your area? (By area we mean up to approximately 5miles from your home)NIMBY-ism is less prevalent with WindBase: 1,822 British adults aged 15 and over, 6th January-26th March 2010% Strongly support % Tend to support % Neither support nor oppose% Tend to oppose % Strongly oppose % Dont know/ No opinionThe building of a new windfarmSource: Cardiff University / Ipsos MORI73%16%
    • © Ipsos MORIWhat steps are the publicwilling to take to help addressthe energy challenge?• Public interest in renewable heating• Public engagement with smartmetering
    • © Ipsos MORIMost only think about gas for the futureQ. If you were going to replace your current heating system, what types ofheating system would you consider to heat both your home and hot water?63%10%8%4%3%3%2%2%3%5%Gas boiler – combination (combi)Gas boiler –but not combination (combi)Gas boiler – not sure what typeOil boiler –combination (combi)Biomass boilerGround-source heat pumpElectric storage heatersGas Fire (mains)Other, please specifyRefused / dont knowMentions of 2% or moreBase: All GB homeowners aged 18+ who do not currently heat their homemainly using a GSHP, ASHP, biomass boiler or heat network (2,848),28th August to 14th October 2012Source: DECC / Ipsos MORI
    • © Ipsos MORI69%60%28%24%17%16%12%18%24%19%23%15%15%15%14%17%53%53%68%69%73%Gas Condensing BoilerSolar thermalGround Source Heat PumpBiomass boilerAir Source Heat PumpHeat network, district or community heatingMicro-CHPI have heard of it and I know what it is I have heard of it but Im not sure what it is I have never heard of thisLow awareness of renewable options, other than solarSource: DECC / Ipsos MORIBase: All GB homeowners aged 18+ (2,900), 28th August to 14th October 2012Q. Which of the following best describes the extent to which you had heard ofeach of these ways of heating your home and/or hot water beforetoday?
    • © Ipsos MORI Source: DECC / Ipsos MORIQ. Having seen this information, how would you say you feel about a...Some renewable options do have appeal once explained44%11%10%8%6%6%36%35%28%26%23%20%311%17%17%21%23%27%13%15%18%21%Gas Condensing BoilerMicro-CHPGround Source Heat PumpHeat NetworkAir Source Heat PumpBiomass BoilerVery positive Fairly positive Fairly negative Very negativeRespondents wereshown basic informationfactsheets about eachtechnology beforeanswering this questionBase: All GB homeowners aged 18+ who do not currently heattheir home through a more efficient heating system (2,848),28th August to 14th October 2012
    • © Ipsos MORI Source: DECC / Ipsos MORIMixed opinions about solar thermalQ. Having seen this information, how positive or negative do you feel aboutusing a solar thermal system to heat your water? Would you say youare…15%30%20%16%16%3%Base: All GB homeowners aged 18+ who own the roof on their property (2,521)Very positiveFairly positiveNeither positive nornegativeFairly negativeVery negativeDon‟tknow
    • © Ipsos MORIHalf of the public have never heard of smart metersBase: Adults aged 18+ who are at least partly responsible for payinghousehold energy bills : 2,159 , 5th – 20th October 2012Source: DECC / Ipsos MORI5%44%50%Yes, I have one Yes, but I don‟t have one No, never heard of themAdjusted figure for ownership: 2%*Q. Before today, had you heard of smart meters?* Adjusted to account for overclaim due tomisunderstanding of smart meter
    • © Ipsos MORIHalf of British bill-payers are still undecided aboutsmart metersBase: Adults aged 18+ who are at least partly responsible for paying household energy bills:Wave 1 (2,396), 30th March – 26th April 2012; Wave 2 (2,159) 5th – 20th October 2012972322454812118844Wave 1Wave 2Strongly support Tend to support No feelings either wayTend to oppose Strongly oppose Dont know32% support 20% oppose29% support 19% opposeQ. To what extent do you support or oppose the installation of smart meters inevery home?Source: DECC / Ipsos MORI
    • © Ipsos MORI9932312527282755Wave 1Wave 2Very interested Fairly interestedNot very interested Not at all interestedDont knowInterest in smart meters highest among younger, andlarger householdsBase: Adults aged 18+ who are at least partly responsible for paying household energy bills and have not had asmart meter installed: Wave 1 (2,267), 30th March – 26th April 2012; Wave 2 (2,049) 5th – 20th October 2012274643314148364956Aged 65+ (588)Aged 35-64 (1,020)Aged 18-35 (441)1 person in HH (531)2-3 persons in HH (1,055)4+ persons in HH (460)Never heard of (1,141)Know at least a little (696)Know a great deal/fair amount (180)Significantly different interest between subgroups(95% confidence level)(Wave 2) % interestedBase sizes in bracketsQ. To what extent would you be interested, or not, in having a smart meterinstalled in your home in the near future?Source: DECC / Ipsos MORI
    • © Ipsos MORISmart meters are expected to help households budget,avoid waste and get accurate bills16%23%3%6%6%8%9%19%26%31%17%22%4%7%9%8%7%19%26%33%Dont knowNothing / no benefitsEnergy SecurityTailored tariffsNot having meter readEnvironmentInfluence othersAccuracyAvoid wasteBudgetingWave 1 Wave 2Base: Adults aged 18+ who are at least partly responsible for paying household energy bills:Wave 1 (2,396), 30th March – 26th April 2012; Wave 2 (2,159) 5th – 20th October 2012Q. What, if anything, do you think you would benefit from if you had a smartmeter installed in your home? (spontaneous)Source: DECC / Ipsos MORI
    • © Ipsos MORIMost think smart meters have no disadvantages,although some are concerned about cost19%10%7%6%1%2%3%2%41%19%17%9%8%7%4%3%2%2%39%20%CostData securityDifficult to understandInconvenienceChecking usage too muchReliabilitySomeone might lose their jobHealthNothingDont knowWave 1 Wave 2Base: Adults aged 18+ who are at least partly responsible for paying household energy bills:Wave 1 (2,396), 30th March – 26th April 2012; Wave 2 (2,159) 5th – 20th October 2012Responses for the code „Checking usage too much‟ cannot be compared as it was added as a pre-code in Wave 2Q. What, if anything, do you think are the disadvantages if you had a smartmeter installed in your home?Source: DECC / Ipsos MORI
    • © Ipsos MORIWhat do consumers expectfrom business?
    • © Ipsos MORIQ. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?Base: 1,055 GB adults 16-64, 7-12 September 2012It is important that companiestake action to try and ensure thatpeople in the future can live well,while also living within the limits ofthe planetThe companies that care aboutpeople and the planet aremore likely to succeed in the longtermCompanies should just focuson making as much profit as theycanTotalagree %71%53%9%There is clear support for company sustainabilitySource: Ipsos MORI Sustainable Business Monitor
    • © Ipsos MORIBase: 1,055 GB adults 16-64, 7-12 September 2012StronglydisagreeTend todisagreeTend toagreeMost large companies in the UK are workingfor the long term good of everyoneStronglyagree (2%)Neitheragree nordisagreeOnly 13% agree thatmost companies areworking for the goodof everyone – half(47%) disagreeDon‟t knowBut few think it is currently happening to any great extentQ. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement?Source: Ipsos MORI Sustainable Business Monitor
    • © Ipsos MORI• Q To what extent you agree or disagree with the following statement?Companies need to prove they are responsibleBase: 1,055 GB adults 16-64, 7-12 September 2012Neither agreenor disagreeDon‟t knowTend to disagreeTend to agreeStrongly disagree (1%)StronglyagreeI don’t think it’s enough for companiesto say that they are responsible, theyneed to prove it to me75% agree thatcompanies need toprove that they arebehaving responsiblySource: Ipsos MORI Sustainable Business MonitorQ. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement?
    • © Ipsos MORIQ. When forming a decision about buying a product or service from a particularcompany or organisation, how important is it that it shows a high degree ofsocial responsibility?Majority say purchase decisions are informed bycorporate responsibilityBase: 954 GB adults 16+, 14-26 September 2012, asked face-to-faceNot at allimportantNot veryimportantVeryimportantFairlyimportantA quarter sayresponsibility isvery important totheir purchasing(74% say it is importantto some degree)Don‟tknowSource: Ipsos MORI Sustainable Business Monitor
    • © Ipsos MORIVersion 1 | PublicFor more information please contact:Edward Langley – Head of Environment Research, Ipsos MORIedward.langley@ipsos.com, 020 7347 3154Antonia Dickman – Associate Director, Ipsos MORIantonia.dickman@ipsos.com, 020 7347 3157