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Intro to Bus chapter 12

Intro to Bus chapter 12

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  • See Learning Goal 1: Trace the history of organized labor in the United States.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Trace the history of organized labor in the United States. Many of the benefits that workers’ enjoy today are due to the battles unions have fought over the past 100 years. Students are often shocked that a little over 100 years ago the average work week was between 60 to 80 hours. The 40 hour work week is a direct result of unions.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Trace the history of organized labor in the United States.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Trace the history of organized labor in the United States.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Trace the history of organized labor in the United States.
  • See Learning Goal 2: Discuss the major legislation affecting labor unions.
  • See Learning Goal 2: Discuss the major legislation affecting labor unions. The National Labor Relations Act (often referred to as the Wagner Act) created the NLRB.
  • See Learning Goal 2: Discuss the major legislation affecting labor unions. Why Join a Union? This slide lists some of the key reasons why a person might consider joining a union. The power of unions has waned as the economy has shifted from an industrial economy into a service based economy. Ask students the following question: Are unions necessary in today’s modern working environment?
  • See Learning Goal 3: Outline the objectives of labor unions.
  • See Learning Goal 3: Outline the objectives of labor unions.
  • See Learning Goal 3: Outline the objectives of labor unions.
  • See Learning Goal 3: Outline the objectives of labor unions.
  • See Learning Goal 3: Outline the objectives of labor unions.
  • See Learning Goal 3: Outline the objectives of labor unions.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Describe the tactics used by labor and management during conflicts, and discuss the role of unions in the future.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Describe the tactics used by labor and management during conflicts, and discuss the role of unions in the future.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Describe the tactics used by labor and management during conflicts, and discuss the role of unions in the future.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Describe the tactics used by labor and management during conflicts, and discuss the role of unions in the future.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Describe the tactics used by labor and management during conflicts, and discuss the role of unions in the future. The percentage of union membership has fallen over the past fifty years. In 1945 35.5% of all workers were unionized today that number stands at only 12.4%.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Describe the tactics used by labor and management during conflicts, and discuss the role of unions in the future.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Describe the tactics used by labor and management during conflicts, and discuss the role of unions in the future. Union Membership by State The slide presents union membership by state in the U.S. New York, Michigan, Hawaii and Alaska lead the states with unionization rates greater than 20%. North Carolina and South Carolina have the lowest percentage of union workers with unionization rates less than 4.9%.
  • See Learning Goal 5: Assess some of today’s controversial employee-management issues, such as executive compensation, pay equity, childcare and elder care, drug testing, and violence in the workplace. Peter Drucker suggested CEO pay should be no more that 20X the lowest paid employee. The average is now 180X.
  • See Learning Goal 5: Assess some of today’s controversial employee-management issues, such as executive compensation, pay equity, childcare and elder care, drug testing, and violence in the workplace.
  • See Learning Goal 5: Assess some of today’s controversial employee-management issues, such as executive compensation, pay equity, childcare and elder care, drug testing, and violence in the workplace.
  • See Learning Goal 5: Assess some of today’s controversial employee-management issues, such as executive compensation, pay equity, childcare and elder care, drug testing, and violence in the workplace. Equal Pay for Equal Work This slide presents the Equal Pay Act factors that justify pay differences: skill, effort, responsibility, and working conditions. The Equal Pay Act prohibits unequal pay to men and women who perform jobs that require substantially the same skills, efforts, responsibilities, etc. Ask the students: Is it fair that different genders receive different pay? (Most will say “NO.”) Yet, in the U.S., women earn only about 80% of what men earn. There are, however, significant disparities by profession, education level, etc.
  • See Learning Goal 5: Assess some of today’s controversial employee-management issues, such as executive compensation, pay equity, childcare and elder care, drug testing, and violence in the workplace. Students should realize that sexual harassment covers all employees as well as vendors, suppliers and others who come in contact with company employees. Businesses need to take all allegations seriously and develop a protocol for investigating each claim.
  • See Learning Goal 5: Assess some of today’s controversial employee-management issues, such as executive compensation, pay equity, childcare and elder care, drug testing, and violence in the workplace.
  • See Learning Goal 5: Assess some of today’s controversial employee-management issues, such as executive compensation, pay equity, childcare and elder care, drug testing, and violence in the workplace.
  • See Learning Goal 5: Assess some of today’s controversial employee-management issues, such as executive compensation, pay equity, childcare and elder care, drug testing, and violence in the workplace.
  • See Learning Goal 5: Assess some of today’s controversial employee-management issues, such as executive compensation, pay equity, childcare and elder care, drug testing, and violence in the workplace. As the population ages caring for one’s parents will be a bigger employment related issue. Proactive companies will develop benefits to meet this challenge.

Chap012 Chap012 Presentation Transcript

  • * * Chapter Twelve Dealing with Employee-Management Issues and Relationships Copyright © 2010 by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill/Irwin
  • GOALS of ORGANIZED LABOR * *
    • To work with fair and competent management.
    • Be treated with human dignity.
    • Receive a reasonable share of wealth in the work it generates.
    Employee -Management Issues LG1 12-
  • ORGANIZED LABOR * *
    • Unions -- Employee organizations whose main goal is to represent members in employee-management negotiations of job-related issues.
    • Labor unions were responsible for:
      • Minimum wage laws
      • Overtime rules
      • Workers’ compensation
      • Severance pay
      • Child-labor laws
      • Job-safety regulations
    LG1 Employee - Management Issues 12-
  • HISTORY of ORGANIZED LABOR * *
    • Craft Union -- An organization of skilled specialists in a particular craft or trade.
    • As early as 1792, shoemakers in a Philadelphia craft union met to discuss fundamental work issues.
    LG1 The Early History of Organized Labor
    • Work weeks were 60+ hours, wages were low and child labor was rampant.
    12-
  • EMERGENCE of LABOR ORGANIZATIONS * *
      • Knights of Labor -- First national labor union; formed in 1869.
    LG1 The Early History of Organized Labor
      • Knights attracted 700,000 members but fell from prominence after a riot in Chicago.
      • American Federation of Labor (AFL) -- An organization of craft unions that championed fundamental labor issues; formed in 1886.
    12-
  • INDUSTRIAL UNIONS * *
    • Industrial Unions -- Labor unions of unskilled or semiskilled workers in mass production industries.
    • Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) -- Union organization of unskilled workers; broke away from the AFL in 1935 and rejoined in 1955.
    • The AFL-CIO today has affiliations with 56 unions and about 10.5 million members.
    LG1 The Early History of Organized Labor 12-
  • EFFECTS of LAWS on LABOR UNIONS * *
    • Labor unions’ growth and influence has been very dependent on public opinion and law.
    • The Norris-LaGuardia Act helped unions by prohibiting the use of Yellow-Dog Contracts -- A type of contract that required employees to agree to NOT join a union.
    • Collective Bargaining -- The process whereby union and management representatives form an agreement, or contract, for employees.
    LG2 Labor Legislation and Collective Bargaining 12-
  • FORMING a UNION in the WORKPLACE * *
    • The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) was created to oversee labor-management issues and provide guidelines for unionization.
    • Certification -- The formal process by which a union is recognized by the NLRB as the bargaining agent for a group of employees.
    • Decertification -- The process whereby employees take away a union’s right to represent them.
    LG2 Labor Legislation and Collective Bargaining 12-
  • WHY JOIN a UNION? * *
    • Pro-union attitudes
    • Poor management/employee relations
    • Negative organizational climate
    • Poor work conditions
    • Union’s reputation
    • Job security
    Labor Legislation and Collective Bargaining LG2 12-
  • LABOR/MANAGEMENT AGREEMENTS * *
    • Negotiated Labor-Management Agreement (Labor Contract) -- Sets the terms under which labor and management will function over a period of time.
    • Union Security Clause -- Stipulates workers who reap union benefits must either join the union or pay dues to the union.
    LG3 Objectives of Organized Labor 12-
  • UNION SECURITY AGREEMENTS * *
    • Closed Shop Agreement -- Specified workers had to be members of a union before being hired for a job.
    • Union Shop Agreement -- Declares workers don’t have to be members of a union to be hired but must agree to join the union within a specific time period.
    • Agency Shop Agreement -- Allows employers to hire nonunion workers who don’t have to join the union but must pay fees.
    LG3 Objectives of Organized Labor 12-
  • RIGHT-to-WORK LAWS * *
    • Right-to-Work Laws -- Legislation that gives workers the right, under an open shop, to join or not to join a union.
    • The Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 granted states the power to outlaw union shop agreements.
    • Open Shop Agreement -- Agreement in right-to-work states that gives workers the right to join or not join a union, if one exists in their workplace.
    LG3 Objectives of Organized Labor 12-
  • RESOLVING DISAGREEMENTS * *
    • Labor contracts outline labor and management’s rights and serves as a guide to workplace relations.
    • Grievances -- A charge by employees that management isn’t abiding by the terms of the negotiated agreement.
    • Shop Stewards -- Union officials who work permanently in an organization and represent employee interests on a daily basis.
    LG3 Resolving Labor-Management Disagreements 12-
  • USING MEDIATION and ARBITRATION * *
    • Bargaining Zone -- The range of options labor and management have between initial and final contract offers that each side will consider before an impasse is reached.
    • Mediation -- The use of a third party to encourage both sides to keep negotiating to resolve key contract issues.
    • Arbitration -- An agreement to bring in a third party to render a binding agreement.
    LG3 Mediation and Arbitration 12-
  • The GRIEVANCE RESOLUTION PROCESS * * LG3 Mediation and Arbitration 12-
  • TACTICS USED in CONFLICTS * *
    • Weapons used by labor unions include:
      • Strikes
      • Boycotts
      • Work Slowdowns
      • Pickets
    LG4 Tactics Used in Labor-Management Conflicts 12-
  • STRIKES and BOYCOTTS * *
    • Strikes -- A strategy in which workers refuse to go to work.
    • Primary Boycott -- When a union encourages both its members and the general public to not buy the products of a firm in a labor dispute.
    • Secondary Boycott -- An attempt by labor to convince others to stop doing business with a firm that’s the subject of a primary boycott.
    LG4 Union Tactics 12-
  • TACTICS USED in CONFLICTS * *
    • Weapons used by management include:
      • Lockouts
      • Injunctions
      • Strikebreakers
    LG4 Tactics Used in Labor-Management Conflicts 12-
  • LOCKOUTS, INJUNCTIONS and STRIKEBREAKERS * *
    • Lockout -- An attempt by management to put pressure on workers by closing the business thus cutting off workers’ pay.
    • Injunction -- A court order directing someone to do something or refrain from doing something.
    • Strikebreakers -- Workers hired to do the work of striking workers until the labor dispute is resolved; called scabs by unions.
    LG4 Management Tactics 12-
  • CHALLENGES FACING LABOR UNIONS * *
    • The number of union workers are falling.
    • Many workers (like airline employees) have agreed to Givebacks -- Gains from labor negotiations are given back to management to help save jobs.
    LG4 Future of Unions and Labor-Management Relations 12-
  • LABOR UNIONS in the FUTURE * *
    • Union membership will include more white-collar, female and foreign-born workers than in the past.
    LG4 Future of Unions and Labor-Management Relations
    • Unions will take on a greater role in training workers, redesigning jobs and assimilating the changing workforce.
    • Unions will seek more job security, profit sharing and increased wages.
    12-
  • UNION MEMBERSHIP by STATE * * LG4 Future of Unions and Labor-Management Relations 12-
  • COMPENSATING EXECUTIVES * * Executive Compensation LG5
    • CEO compensation used to be determined by a firm’s profitability or increase in stock price.
    • Now, executives receive stock options and restricted stock that’s awarded even if the company performs poorly.
    12-
  • COMPENSATING EXECUTIVES in the FUTURE * * Executive Compensation LG5
    • Boards of directors are being challenged concerning executive contracts.
    • Government and shareholders are putting pressure to overhaul executive compensation.
    • Financial crisis of 2008-2009 strengthened the argument of shareholders concerning limits on compensation.
    12-
  • The QUESTION of PAY EQUITY * * Pay Equity LG5
    • Women earn 78.7% of what men earn.
    • This disparity varies by profession, experience and level of education.
    • The 2009 Paycheck Fairness Act strengthened protections against compensation discrimination.
    12-
  • EQUAL PAY for EQUAL WORK Equal Pay Act Factors that Justify Pay Differences * *
    • Skill
    • Effort
    • Responsibility
    • Working Conditions
    Pay Equity LG5 12-
  • WHAT’S SEXUAL HARASSMENT * * Sexual Harassment LG5
    • Sexual Harassment -- Unwelcomed sexual advances, requests for sexual favors or other verbal or physical conduct that creates a hostile work environment.
    • Sexual harassment laws cover men, women and foreign companies doing business in the U.S.
    • Violations can be extremely expensive for businesses.
    12-
  • KINDS of SEXUAL HARASSMENT * * Sexual Harassment LG5
    • Quid pro quo sexual harassment involves threats like “Go out with me or you’re fired.” An employee’s job is based on submission.
    • Hostile work environment sexual harassment is conduct that interferes with a worker’s performance or creates an intimidating or offensive work environment.
    12-
  • FACING CHILDCARE ISSUES * * Child Care LG5
    • The number of women in the workforce with children under three-years-old has increased.
    • Childcare related absences cost businesses billions of dollars each year.
    • Who should pay for the cost of childcare - a dividing issue among employees and businesses.
    12-
  • BUSINESSES RESPONSE to CHILD CARE * * Child Care LG5
    • Firms have established discount arrangements with national childcare providers.
    • Employees are given vouchers that offer payment toward childcare.
    • Referral services identify high-quality childcare facilities to employees.
    • On-site childcare centers and sick-child centers have been established at some companies.
    12-
  • INCREASING ELDER CARE CHALLENGES * * Elder Care LG5
    • Households with at least one adult providing elder care has tripled.
    • About 20 million workers provide care which costs companies $11 billion a year in absenteeism, reduced productivity and turnover.
    • Costs could rise up to $25 billion.
    12-