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Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia

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- Australia's solar resource and grid connectivity …

- Australia's solar resource and grid connectivity
- Effect of 20% Renewable Energy target
- Solar Flagships program and long term cost
- Solar thermal developments in the region
Dr Jim Smitham, Deputy Director, Theme Leader, Energy Transformed Flagship, CSIRO, Australia

Published in: Technology, Business

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  • 1. Recent Developments in CommercialisingSolar Thermal Power in AustraliaENERGY TRANSFORMED FLAGSHIPDr Jim Smitham & Dr Alexander WonhasFebruary 2011
  • 2. Overview Australias Solar Resource and Grid Connectivity Effect of 20% Renewable Energy Target Solar Flagships Program and Long Term Cost Solar Thermal Developments in the RegionRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 2
  • 3. Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in AustraliaAustralias Solar Resource andGrid Connectivity Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 3
  • 4. Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 4
  • 5. Growth of Annual Electricity Consumption GWh 300 000 250 000 200 000 150 000 GWh 100 000 50 000 0 1960-61 1962-63 1964-65 1966-67 1968-69 1970-71 1972-73 1974-75 1976-77 1978-79 1980-81 1982-83 1984-85 1986-87 1988-89 1990-91 1992-93 1994-95 1996-97 1998-99 2000-01 2002-03 2004-05 2006-07 Source: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE), Australian GovernmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 5
  • 6. Age of Infrastructure Source: Electricity Gas Australia 2010, Energy Supply Association of Australia (esaa)Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 6
  • 7. Growth in Peak Demand for Electricity National Electricity Market Peak Demand 40 Summer peak demand growth (1999-2009): 3.6% 35 30 25 SummerGigawatts 20 Winter Winter peak demand growth (1999-2009): 2.4% 15 10 5 0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Source: Electricity Gas Australia, various issues Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 7
  • 8. Australia: Electricity Transmission Network 90% Source: Energy network infrastructure and the climate change challenge report by Parsons Brinkerhoff to ENA (Energy Networks Australia), March 2009Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 8
  • 9. Australia’s Solar Resource andElectricity Transmission NetworksRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 9
  • 10. Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 10
  • 11. Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in AustraliaEffect of 20% Renewable EnergyTarget Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 11
  • 12. Government Programs & Rebates Schemes• Federal Government • Renewable Energy Target • Clean Energy Initiatives – $5 billion • Solar Flagships Program – $1.35 billion • Australian Centre for Renewable Energy – over $690 million • Renewable Energy Future Fund - $100 million • Australian Solar Institute - $150 million (2008-2012) • Smart Grid, Smart City - up to $100 million • Solar Cities - over $75 million • National Solar Schools – over $51 million • Multi Party Climate Change Committee – to price carbon from 2012 Source: Department of Climate Change, Australian GovernmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 12
  • 13. Enhanced Renewable Energy Target• Original Renewable Energy Target commenced 1 January 2010 to encourage additional generation of electricity from renewables to meet commitment to achieving 20% of electricity from renewables by 2020• Increased from 9,500 to 45,000 GWh by 2020 from 1 January 2011 • Legal liability on wholesalers to purchase • Sets the frame for both the supply and demand of Renewable Energy Certificates (REC)• Extended from 2020 to 2030• Split into two parts • Large Scale Renewable Energy Target (LRET) • large-scale renewable energy projects like wind farms, commercial solar and geothermal, will deliver the majority of the 2020 target • Small Scale Renewable Energy Scheme (SRES) • households, small business and community groups Source: Department of Resources Tourism & Energy, Australian GovernmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 13
  • 14. Legislated Annual Renewable Energy Targets Source: Renewable Energy Regulator, Australian GovernmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 14
  • 15. Solar Innovation ChainRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Source: Australian Solar Institute Slide 15
  • 16. Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in AustraliaSolar Flagships Program and LongTerm Cost Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 16
  • 17. Solar Flagships Program• The Government has committed $1.35 billion to support the construction of up to four large scale, grid-connected solar power stations in Australia, using solar thermal and photovoltaic technologies• The Solar Flagships program (SFP) is part of the Australian Government’s $5 billion expanded Clean Energy Initiative (CEI)• The primary objective of the Solar Flagships program is to provide the foundation for large scale, grid-connected, solar power to play a significant role in Australia’s electricity supply and to operate within a competitive electricity market. The Government’s aim is to establish up to 1,000 megawatts of solar power generation capacity• 32 submissions first round Source: Department of Resources Tourism & Energy, Australian GovernmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 17
  • 18. Solar Flagship Project Descriptions Round 1 –Solar Thermal Shortlisted Projects• ACCIONA Solar Power • ACCIONA Solar Power proposed to generate 200 MW using solar thermal parabolic trough technology at a single site in Queensland. The consortium comprises ACCIONA Solar Power and its subsidiaries, Mitsubishi Corporation, ACCIONA Infrastructures, Australia’s BMD Constructions and Australian engineering firm, GHD. Project withdrawn• Parsons Brinkerhoff • Parsons Brinckerhoff leads the Solar Flair Alliance involving Siemens Pty Ltd, John Holland and CS Energy to construct a conventional 150MW solar thermal parabolic trough power station next to the Kogan Creek Power Station in Queensland. The project will use Siemens solar and power generation technology Source: Department of Resources Tourism & Energy, Australian GovernmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 18
  • 19. Solar Flagship Project Descriptions Round 1 –Solar Thermal Shortlisted Projects cont’d• Transfield • A consortium consisting of Transfield Holdings, Novatec (a subsidiary of Transfield Holdings), Transfield Services and the Transfield Services Infrastructure Fund plan to convert the existing coal fired Collinsville power station in north Queensland to a 150 MW solar thermal station. Chosen technology is linear fresnel• Wind Prospect CWP • Wind Prospect CWP Pty Ltd has formed a consortium with CS Energy Ltd, AREVA Solar and Mitsui & Co (Australia) Ltd to develop, build and operate a stand alone, 250 MW solar thermal power plant at Kogan Creek, near Chinchilla in Queensland. Chosen technology is is Areva’s Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector (CLFR) Source: Department of Resources Tourism & Energy, Australian GovernmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 19
  • 20. Solar Flagship Project Descriptions Round 1 –Solar PV Shortlisted Projects• AGL • In collaboration with First Solar and Bovis Lend Lease, is developing up to five solar photovoltaic (PV) projects with a total capacity of up to 200 MW AC in up to five different states and territories• BP Solar • BP Solar is leading a consortium to develop, construct, own and operate a 150 MW photovoltaic (PV) facility in the NSW Tablelands• Infigen Suntech • Infigen Energy have formed a consortium to build solar power plants with a capacity of between 150 MW and 195 MW at up to three sites in Victoria or NSW• TRUenergy • TRUenergy proposes to build a 180 MW solar power plant near Mildura in Victoria Source: Department of Resources Tourism & Energy, Australian GovernmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 20
  • 21. Locations of Solar Flagship Projects Transfield, Collinsville Acciona Solar Power, Emerald, QLD Parsons Brinkerhoff & Wind Prospect CWP, Kogan Creek BP Solar & Infigen Suntech, Moree Infigen Suntech, Nyngan TRUenergy & Infigen Suntech, Manildra Infigen Suntech, Mildura Infigen Suntech, Bungendore Key: AGL, up to 5 Solar Thermal sites proposed Solar PV for ACT, NSW, Solar PV, multiple VIC, QLD & SA sites for one projectRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 21
  • 22. Solar Thermal Energy at 10c/kWh (USD) Source: DOE/GO-12007-2400: Report to Congress on Assessment of Potential Impact of Concentrating Solar Power for Electricity Generation (EPACT 2005 – Section 934(c)) February 2007Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 22
  • 23. Cost of CSP Source: Department of Resources Tourism & Energy, Australian GovernmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 23
  • 24. Cost of CSP Source: Department of Resources Tourism & Energy, Australian GovernmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 24
  • 25. Cost of CSPRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 25
  • 26. Cost of CSP Source: What’s Next for Alternative Energy? Boston Consulting Group Report 2010Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 26
  • 27. Where Will the Savings Come From?• Increased plant efficiency – peak temperature? Concentration ratio, optical efficiency, receiver efficiency, cycle efficiency...• Power block and heliostat economies of scale• Technical maturity – component and ongoing costs• Location, location, location!Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 27
  • 28. Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in AustraliaSolar Thermal Developments in theRegion Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 28
  • 29. Commercial Ventures in Australia• Wizard Power • The Whyalla Solar Oasis is a project developed by N.P Power and Sustainable Power Partners in consortium with Wizard Power. The project will develop a commercial scale 40MWe concentrating solar thermal power plant in Whyalla, South Australia. Chosen technology is ANU’s “Big Dish”• Solar Systems (purchased by Silex 2010) • Announced in 2006 a 154MW concentrating PV plant in Mildura, Victoria to be developed in three stages (Stage 1: 2MW Pilot Demonstration Facility in 2011; Stage 2: 102MW Solar Power Station by 2013; Stage 3: 50MW Extension). Project rescope.• CS Energy • A 44 MW(peak) equivalent superheated steam solar boost to the coal-fired turbines of the existing 750MW Kogan Creek Power Station in Queensland. Expected to be operational in 2012. Chosen technology is Areva’s Compact Linear Fresnal Reflector (CLFR)Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 29
  • 30. Commercial Ventures in Australia• Lloyd Energy • Announced 3MWe installation of a high concentration solar tower in Cooma, New South Wales and a 16 tower solar array at Lake Cargelligo in central New South Wales (end of grid) • Announced 10MW plant using a heliostat field and a graphite block receiver/steam generator at Cloncurry in Queensland (end of grid)• Mid West Energy • Proposed a 200MW linear Fresnel power plant located at Perenjori 300km north of Perth Western Australia. Chosen technology is Areva’s Compact Linear Fresnal Reflector (CLFR)• AREVA (purchased AUSRA 2010) • Has developed and is expanding world’s first solar 3MWe thermal power collector system for coal‐fired power augmentation using Compact Linear Fresnal Reflector (CLFR) technology for supplying solar‐generated steam to the 2,000MW Liddell Power Station in New South WalesRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 30
  • 31. Australian Solar Institute• The Australian Solar Institute is a component of the Australian Government’s Clean Energy Initiative. The ASI has a $150 million allocation for the period 2008-2012.• Key objectives of the Australian Solar Institute include: • advancing and accelerating innovation in solar thermal and solar photovoltaic technologies in Australia • driving research that will have a major impact on the efficiency and cost effectiveness of solar technologies • increasing the competitiveness of solar technologies • retaining local and attracting international expertise in solar energy research to Australia • establishing Australia as a key player in the development of solar energy technologies in the Asia-Pacific region • $50 million US-Australia Solar Research Collaboration initiative to accelerate the reduction in costs for solar energy technologies• At May 2010 13 projects funded • $44.5 million funding supporting 13 R&D projects with a total activity value of around $131 million Source: Australian Solar InstituteRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 31
  • 32. Solar Thermal ResearchRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 32
  • 33. Solar Thermal Research• CSIRO Demonstration of Solar-Enhanced Fuels for Electricity and Transport Applications • New “solarization” process to reform natural gas with steam and CO2 to produce syngas, which can feed a gas turbine • Develop new reactors and catalysts able to use CO2 as a reactant, thus making use of the waste stream and minimizing water useRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 33
  • 34. Solar Thermal Research• ASI • CSIRO Foundation Project • ASI fully funded $5 million project to construct a new solar tower and heliostats at the CSIRO Energy Centre in Newcastle (1MWTH) • Solar Brayton demonstraton • CSIRO and the Australian National University: Development of Advanced Solar Thermal Energy Storage Technologies for Integration with Energy Intensive Industrial Processes and Electricity Generation • University of Newcastle: Fabrication of Thermionic Devices Using Directional Solidification / Sintering Processes for High Temperature Concentrating Solar Thermal Applications • CSIRO and the Australian National University: Advanced Steam Generating Receivers for High Concentration Solar Collectors • In CST innovation ASI sought proposals in Round 2 that will reduce the levelised cost of solar energy by increasing the efficiency of CST energy generation • CSIRO target 10c/kWhRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 34
  • 35. ASI CSIRO Foundation ProjectRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 35
  • 36. Solar Brayton Systems• Scalable from micro-turbines up to large gas turbines• Distributed generation option for CSP• Spinning mass reduces the impact of transient output• Can be co-fired with supplementary energy source such as natural gas providing high 4 availability 2• Only inputs required are air and sun 1 3• Large capacities can be met by clustering individual unitsRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 36
  • 37. PV Position in Australia• Current position • Total installed capacity in Australia 184 MW • 87% grid connected • Total of 79 MW installed in 2009, 360% increase on 2008 • 12 MW of cells were produced in Australia in 2009 from imported wafers • Government expenditure on research, development, demonstration and market incentives totalled AUD526 million in 2009 Source: National Survey Report of PV Power Applications in Australia 2009, Australian PV AssociationRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 37
  • 38. Summary• Australia has a quality solar resource, constrained by network access• Opportunities for solar thermal off grid at many locations• Government confusion over solar thermal power cost compared with recent PV cost trend• Stimulus programs – MRET, Solar Flagships, carbon price setting will encourage further development• Pathways to 10c/KWh will drive developmentRecent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia Slide 38
  • 39. Energy Transformed FlagshipDr Jim Smitham & Dr Alexander WonhasPhone: +61 2 4960 6000Email: jim.smitham@csiro.auWeb: www.csiro.au/org/EnergyTransformedFlagshipThank youContact UsPhone: 1300 363 400 or +61 3 9545 2176Email: Enquiries@csiro.au Web: www.csiro.au
  • 40. Recent Developments in Commercialising Solar Thermal Power in Australia