Free the Animals:     Effective Action Against Vivisection                 Conference             October 27-28, 2012The I...
U.S. 2011 import statistics   U.S. is a huge importer of    primates for research:    18,140 in 2011   Crab-eating macaq...
Problems with import statistics   Some shipments are not    reported to USFWS   It’s unclear if USFWS inspects    animal...
The crab-eating macaque   Macaca fascicularis, AKA:    •   Long-tailed macaque    •   Cynomolgus monkey        (“cyno” fo...
The Chinese trade   Crab-eating macaques    are not native to China   Nevertheless, China has    become the main supplie...
1977: India bans primate exports   After IPPL uncovered primate abuse in military    experiments, India banned rhesus mon...
After 1977: Trading placesRhesus macaque     Crab-eating macaque(Macaca mulatta)   (Macaca fascicularis)
Global exports of crab-eating macaques            (Source: CITES database)80,00070,00060,00050,00040,00030,00020,00010,000...
Total number of crab-eatingmacaques traded through 2010     1,089,124
2004: Project BioShield $5.6 billion over 10 years Focus on animal testing Stockpile and develop vaccines  •   Anthrax ...
A secret plea from Cambodia“A Korea listed company Orient Bio group buy amonkey farm in kampong chhnang province, Cambodia...
Inside a Cambodian monkey farm
Inside a Cambodian monkey farm
Inside a Cambodian monkey farm
Inside a Cambodian monkey farm
Cambodian monkey farm,   capacity: 15,000
Cambodian monkey farm,   capacity: 35,000
Latest trend: Primates on demand
Wild-caught crab-eating macaques
The real face of the primate trade…                        Photo credit: BUAV
Possible actions   Have protests/letters targeting    embassies   Improve macaque PR   Do undercover investigations    ...
Stay in touch with the International            Primate Protection League!    TMP.O. Box 766Summerville, SC 29484E-mail: i...
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The International Trade in Primates for Labs

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IPPL Founder and Executive Shirley McGreal delivered this presentation at the "Free the Animals: Effective Action Against Vivisection" conference in Saint Louis, MO,

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The International Trade in Primates for Labs

  1. 1. Free the Animals: Effective Action Against Vivisection Conference October 27-28, 2012The International Trade inPrimates for Laboratories Dr. Shirley McGreal IPPL Founder and Executive Director TM
  2. 2. U.S. 2011 import statistics U.S. is a huge importer of primates for research: 18,140 in 2011 Crab-eating macaques are the most commonly imported species (89%) China remains the largest country of origin for U.S.’s imported primates (70%)
  3. 3. Problems with import statistics Some shipments are not reported to USFWS It’s unclear if USFWS inspects animal shipments bound for labs via military bases It’s hard to obtain comparison data from Customs and CDC databases USFWS statistics represent minimum numbers of imports
  4. 4. The crab-eating macaque Macaca fascicularis, AKA: • Long-tailed macaque • Cynomolgus monkey (“cyno” for short) • Java macaque Once widespread through much of Southeast Asia On CITES Appendix II IUCN “Least Concern”
  5. 5. The Chinese trade Crab-eating macaques are not native to China Nevertheless, China has become the main supplier to world markets China is suspected of raiding the wild monkey populations of neighboring countries and calling them “captive bred”
  6. 6. 1977: India bans primate exports After IPPL uncovered primate abuse in military experiments, India banned rhesus monkey exports. “Received your letter of 3rd yesterday evening. You are quite correct in saying that I banned the export of monkeys on a humanitarian basis… I believe in preventing cruelty to all living beings in any form. This is the ancient Indian culture and is a part of vegetarianism.” Morarji Desai, former Prime Minister of India, 1985 “I now realise from Mr Desai’s letter that the International Primate Protection League played the really key role in getting the ban declared in the first place and that the ban indeed reflected Indian concern over the cruel and inhumane use of primates.” Dr. Charles Southwick, conservationist, 1985
  7. 7. After 1977: Trading placesRhesus macaque Crab-eating macaque(Macaca mulatta) (Macaca fascicularis)
  8. 8. Global exports of crab-eating macaques (Source: CITES database)80,00070,00060,00050,00040,00030,00020,00010,000 0
  9. 9. Total number of crab-eatingmacaques traded through 2010 1,089,124
  10. 10. 2004: Project BioShield $5.6 billion over 10 years Focus on animal testing Stockpile and develop vaccines • Anthrax • Ebola • Smallpox • Plague • H1N1
  11. 11. A secret plea from Cambodia“A Korea listed company Orient Bio group buy amonkey farm in kampong chhnang province, Cambodia.The status of the farm is very bad. Food for monkey isonly corn or pumpkin per day. All monkey house isbroken, a lot of sharp broken metal inside pen can hurtmonkey. The health status of monkey is very bad. Youcan see the individual cage is terrible to monkey. A lotof monkey died every day. They only put the dead bodyunder the soil. Attached a lot of photo for you to see.”
  12. 12. Inside a Cambodian monkey farm
  13. 13. Inside a Cambodian monkey farm
  14. 14. Inside a Cambodian monkey farm
  15. 15. Inside a Cambodian monkey farm
  16. 16. Cambodian monkey farm, capacity: 15,000
  17. 17. Cambodian monkey farm, capacity: 35,000
  18. 18. Latest trend: Primates on demand
  19. 19. Wild-caught crab-eating macaques
  20. 20. The real face of the primate trade… Photo credit: BUAV
  21. 21. Possible actions Have protests/letters targeting embassies Improve macaque PR Do undercover investigations following inside leads Campaign to upgrade macaque status from CITES Appendix II to I Ask other groups what they are doing to protect macaques
  22. 22. Stay in touch with the International Primate Protection League! TMP.O. Box 766Summerville, SC 29484E-mail: info@ippl.orgWeb: www.ippl.orgPhone: 843-871-2280

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