AR2010:  “The Tragedy of Trade”   The International Primate Trade: Monkey Business Goes Global Dr. Shirley McGreal Interna...
“ No Place on Earth” Untouched by the Primate Trade <ul><li>Nepalese mountaineer Jyamchang Bhote on Mt. Everest with IPPL’...
“ Plain” Monkeys Under Hidden Threat from “Legal” Export <ul><li>Primates imported into U.S. in 2009 (USFWS): </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>International primate trade most affected by CITES </li></ul><ul><li>CITES: leading international treaty governing...
Primates and Appendices <ul><li>All  primates are on either Appendix I or II </li></ul><ul><li>Appendix I: Includes all ap...
Example 1: Monkey Laundering Cambodia  ► China  ► The West <ul><li>Cambodia:  Wild-caught macaques transferred to breeding...
Example 2: Chinese Numbers   Wild-caught  ► “Captive-bred” <ul><li>China has no native crab-eating macaques </li></ul><ul>...
Example 3: Outsourced to Malaysia   Research/breeding sites  ► Developing nations <ul><li>EU debates on phasing out primat...
Example 4: Nepal “Monkey Farms”   Native monkeys  ► Western labs <ul><li>Rhesus export ban from India/etc. since 1970s, re...
Contact the  International Primate Protection League  <ul><li>IPPL </li></ul><ul><li>P.O. Box 766 </li></ul><ul><li>Summer...
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Ar2010 ippl-the tragedy of trade

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Presentation delivered by Dr. Shirley McGreal, founder of IPPL, during the 2010 National Animal Rights Conference in Washington, D.C.

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  • The Tragedy of Trade (animal abuses in world trade; animal imports)
  • 22,098 total primate imports in 2009
  • Ar2010 ippl-the tragedy of trade

    1. 1. AR2010: “The Tragedy of Trade” The International Primate Trade: Monkey Business Goes Global Dr. Shirley McGreal International Primate Protection League www.ippl.org
    2. 2. “ No Place on Earth” Untouched by the Primate Trade <ul><li>Nepalese mountaineer Jyamchang Bhote on Mt. Everest with IPPL’s protest banner, May 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>IPPL campaigns with WWG (Nepal) to ban native rhesus exports </li></ul><ul><li>Nepal’s monkeys highlight sustainability and globalization issues </li></ul>
    3. 3. “ Plain” Monkeys Under Hidden Threat from “Legal” Export <ul><li>Primates imported into U.S. in 2009 (USFWS): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Crab-eating macaque monkeys: 19,979 (90%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rhesus macaque monkeys: 1,596 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other monkeys/ prosimians: 515 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apes: 8 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can this continue, even for “common” monkeys? </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>International primate trade most affected by CITES </li></ul><ul><li>CITES: leading international treaty governing trade in endangered species (1975) </li></ul><ul><li>Most nations (175 out of 195) are signatories </li></ul><ul><li>Appendix II and I listings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>II: trade permitted if animals legally removed from the wild and “no detriment” to species </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>I: commercial trade banned (import and export permits needed for transport) </li></ul></ul>Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species
    5. 5. Primates and Appendices <ul><li>All primates are on either Appendix I or II </li></ul><ul><li>Appendix I: Includes all apes and all lemurs (as well as many monkeys) </li></ul><ul><li>Appendix II (less protected) monkey species like macaques traded more easily </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Traded with only export permits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Export permits easily falsified </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wild-caught animals listed as captive-born to evade regulations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multinational corporations/ research facilities exploit these loopholes </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Example 1: Monkey Laundering Cambodia ► China ► The West <ul><li>Cambodia: Wild-caught macaques transferred to breeding/collecting centers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wild-caught and captive-born monkeys shipped to China </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Suspect “captive born” documents often used </li></ul></ul><ul><li>China: Monkeys become menu items/export items </li></ul><ul><li>The West: Monkeys in high demand for biowarfare experiments </li></ul>Cambodian monkeys awaiting export
    7. 7. Example 2: Chinese Numbers Wild-caught ► “Captive-bred” <ul><li>China has no native crab-eating macaques </li></ul><ul><li>China claims: exported only “12,244” of these “captive-bred” monkeys 2004-2007 (CITES workshop, Nov. 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>But U.S. alone imported 13,952 from China in 2007 (USFWS) </li></ul>
    8. 8. Example 3: Outsourced to Malaysia Research/breeding sites ► Developing nations <ul><li>EU debates on phasing out primate research </li></ul><ul><li>Pharmaceutical companies increasingly seeking to outsource research and testing </li></ul><ul><li>Issues of welfare, legal recourse, etc. </li></ul>IPPL (UK) and BUAV protest at Malaysian High Commission
    9. 9. Example 4: Nepal “Monkey Farms” Native monkeys ► Western labs <ul><li>Rhesus export ban from India/etc. since 1970s, results in alleged “shortage” of monkeys </li></ul><ul><li>Native rhesus monkeys sought for 2 U.S. labs </li></ul><ul><li>Nepal cancels export plans in August 2009, 200+ monkeys released into national park! </li></ul>Former monkey holding and breeding center in Lele, Nepal
    10. 10. Contact the International Primate Protection League <ul><li>IPPL </li></ul><ul><li>P.O. Box 766 </li></ul><ul><li>Summerville, SC 29484 </li></ul><ul><li>Phone: 843-871-2280 </li></ul><ul><li>Fax: 843-871-7988 </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail: info@ippl.org </li></ul><ul><li>Web: www.ippl.org </li></ul>

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