Using Interactive Metronome® in Schools

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Check out these great tips on how to use Interactive Metronome® in the school setting. See how to work with children from resource classes to gifted students in public and private schools. A great way to boost your private practice and make more money while advancing your career.

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  • Bricole….once again, I will leave the formatting and layout up to your magic!! Feel free to split slides if too busy…mj
  • Charter: State run charters are schools not affiliated with local school districts. They are often established by universities, non-profit groups and some government entities.
    In addition, some school districts permit corporations to open chains of for-profit charter schools.
    Home-schooling: It allows parents a legal option for providing a learning environment for their children other than publicly-provided schools.
  • Build rapport with classroom teachers
    2. Take the time to educate the administrators  about IM; starting at building level principals and working up to Dept heads for Special Ed and  Curriculum.
    3.  Be sure when you talk to administrators that you tie in the benefits of IM with writing, math, behavior, attention/concentration and especially test scores.  School Districts who perform poorly on State exams are put into performance improvement and could lose money if the trend continued.  Building Principals want their building to perform well and know that their job ultimately is on the line if scores don't stay at satisfactory levels.  In Arkansas, state benchmark exams are given for Literacy, Math and Science.  The students who have received IM have demonstrated positive improvements in the Math and Literacy scores, with increases in Math scores happening before increases in Reading/Literacy.
    4.  Talk to the Director of Curriculum for the district and give them numbers from research and what that could do for the district.  Again tie it into testing scores, Response to intervention (RTI).  Changes in scores are definitely documented and something that can be followed over time.  That is what we are doing to prove efficacy to our district.  That way they will continue to pay for the minutes/units year after year. We didn't know just how much IM would affect these, but, now we can say that it definitely does!
    5.  You need to have a point person who will collect information, test scores, etc. to help prove efficacy over time, do training or be there to help with people who are new to IM, initiate scheduling etc. otherwise it can get overwhelming for everyone.
    6.  Take time to familiarize yourself with the machine and reports on the machine.  Play with it for awhile and get your own task average down before you try to pattern anyone.
    7. A weekly schedule is imperative if the machine is being shared, almost as much as putting the machine on a cart so that set up and take down time is minimized.  Post the schedule on the cart and give copies to others using the machine so they know where it goes next.
    8.  IEPS: if you see a child more than their scheduled time on the IEP, get a permission slip signed by the parent allowing this.  It just covers you.
    9.  Scheduling can be difficult and three times a week might not be possible.  While more is better, any time is better than none.  (You have to be intentional especially during certain times during the school year Christmas and spring are difficult)  We also see kids before or after school if scheduling is too hard during school or if the student isn't a therapy kid but needs intervention.  Beginning an IM program at the start of the school year has worked best for us.
    In our study some of our kids who showed awesome gains only got 9/12 sessions (4weeks) and only 200-300 reps each time.  My thought here is that any amount of time you can do it is better than not getting IM. I do think that at least twice a week is good and best case is 3x a week. You'll see bigger gains with more reps as long as the student doesn't become overwhelmed, bored etc. 
  • We do a master schedule each nine weeks and move the machine to the next person on the schedule to make things flow better.  
    A weekly schedule is imperative if the machine is being shared, almost as much as putting the machine on a cart so that set up and take down time is minimized.  Post the schedule on the cart and give copies to others using the machine so they know where it goes next.
  • I would consider your 3-5th graders at first only because they have more testing that you can track before and after IM (especially if you can start in Jan and go until Benchmarks) that way you'll have the documentation you'll need to get the schools to buy more machines. Of course that doesn't go with the portfolio kids.
    When writing our notes we document IM as an activity to achieve a certain goal that way Medicaid will pay for it.  Our speech path doesn't even mention it in her notes, rather states that she worked on timing and rhythm for fluency or something like that. Talk to the Director of Curriculum for the district and give them numbers from research and what that could do for the district.  Again tie it into testing scores, Response to intervention (RTI).  Changes in scores are definitely documented and something that can be followed over time.  That is what we are doing to prove efficacy to our district.  That way they will continue to pay for the minutes/units year after year. We didn't know just how much IM would affect these, but, now we can say that it definitely does! Our pilot study helped demonstrate to the district the cost effectiveness of using IM, they then funded through the curriculum budget 6 IM stations for the 4 elementary schools and the middle school and junior high last year.  We did not and I would not charge for IM specifically, just use it as a modality part of your therapy time, just like you would heavy input activities or visual perceptual activities, etc.  I agree the cost is a bit of a challenge, but well worth it.  Our district/state is really into raising standardized test scores and we have proof that our kids who did IM definitely raised scores.  Of course our district also offered remediation but the kids with the most significant improvements were our IM kids. 
  • Using Interactive Metronome® in Schools

    1. 1. By: Mary Jones, OTR/L Sensational Kids LLC Bradenton, FL Using Interactive Metronome in Schools
    2. 2. Which School Environment? Public - traditional  An educational institution funded with tax revenue and administered by local government or government agency. Public - Charter  Elementary or high schools that receive public money but have been freed from some of the rules, regulations and statutes that apply to other public schools in exchange for some kind of accountability for producing certain results, which are set forth in each schools charter. No tuition fees are rendered due.
    3. 3. Which School Environment? Private • Not administered by local, state or national governments. • Funded by student tuition and sometimes private donation. Home Based • The education of children at home, usually by parents or tutors , as an alternative to a traditional school setting.
    4. 4. What Age?  Pre-school (age 3-5 years)  Elementary (kindergarten to 5th or 6th grade)  Middle (also known as intermediate or junior high school – 6th or 7th grade to 8th or 9th grade)  High (also called secondary school – 9th to 12th grade)
    5. 5. Groups?...What Size Group – small: 2-4; Large: 6-8; Class: 18-24  Individual - Direct  Single IM station  Multiple IM stations  Multiple Triggers
    6. 6. What Space?  Classroom – assigned  Classroom - generic  Designated treatment space  Indoors  Outdoors  Large  Small
    7. 7. Which Provider? • Therapy: OT – PT – SLP • Faculty • Resource • Educators • Tutors • Parents
    8. 8. Marketing to Schools…. What do you say? 1. What is Interactive Metronome? 2. Why is timing important? 3. How does IM help children? 4. The neurological influence of IM 5. The academic relevance of IM 6. The athletic relevance of IM
    9. 9. 1) What is Interactive Metronome? A computerized brain training program Administered by certified licensed professionals Addresses a child’s mental/interval timing
    10. 10. 2) Why is timing important? Improved timing and rhythm perception translates into significant improvements in developmental progress, academic achievement and sports performance.
    11. 11. 3) How does IM help children?  All daily activities involve timing and rhythm: - Listening - Daily Routines - Play - Movement - Reading - Writing - Math - Sports - Attention  There is a strong connection between rhythmic ability and skilled motor acquisition.  IM training involves reducing timing error during a child’s interaction with a synchronized metronome beat
    12. 12. 4) Neurological influence of IM  Brain plasticity  Hemispheric interaction  Inter-hemispheric coupling (bimanual coordination)  Inhibitory/excitatory facilitation  Association  Motor planning  Attention  Sensory feedback
    13. 13. 5) The Academic Relevance of IM Pathways Center Pilot Study  Jacokes (2004) Use of IM in Benton Public Schools  Pilot study by Debra Law, OT; Patricia Snowden, SLP; Aamie Mason, SLP Improvement in Interval Time Tracking and Effects of Reading Achievement  Taub, McGrew & Keith (2007)
    14. 14. Pathways Center Pilot Study Jacokes (2004)  13 subjects Pre/post assessments included: 1. CLEF-3: Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, Third Edition 2. Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency 3. Sensory Profile – Care Giver Questionnaire 4. Interactive Metronome Parent Questionnaire 5. Self Perception Survey 6. Handwriting Evaluation Tool 7. The Listening Test 8. Draw A Person
    15. 15. Pathways Center Pilot Study Jacokes (2004) Improvements noted in:  Balance & bilateral coordination  Sensory processing (10 subscales of Sensory Profile)  Handwriting (legibility, copying speed, simple dictation)  Auditory processing (concept formation, reasoning)  Attention/concentration (parent report)  All improvements were maintained at 3 months, with further improvements 6 months post-IM treatment
    16. 16. Applied Intelligence • Problem Solving & Critical Thinking Skills • Ability to Retain & Apply Learning Developmental • Fine Motor Skills • Gross Motor Skills • Communication Skills • Adaptive Behavior • Independence • Hearing/Vision • Sensory Awareness & • Tolerance Classroom Behavior • Self Control • Attend Over Time • Work Independently • Organizational Skills • Attention to Detail • Willingness to Work Perceptual Processing • Ability to Interpret & Analyze Information Psychological/Social Skills • Self Management • Self Esteem/Self Concept • Responsibility • Integrity The Use of IM in the Benton Public Schools Pilot study by Debra Law, OT; Patricia Snowden, SLP; Aamie Mason, SLP
    17. 17. BASC-2 Teacher Rating Scales Report Area Number of students scoring Clinically Significant Pre/post Number of students scoring At Risk Pre/post Number of students scoring Typical Pre/post Hyperactivity 2/0 1/1 5/7 Aggression 1/0 1/0 6/8 Conduct Problems 1/0 1/0 6/8 Externalizing problems 1/0 0/0 7/8 Anxiety 0/1 2/1 6/6 Depression 0/0 4/0 4/8 Somatization 2/0 3/0 3/8 Internalizing Problems 1/0 3/0 4/8 Attention problems 3/1 2/2 3/5 Learning Problems 2/0 3/4 3/4 School Problems 2/0 2/2 4/6 Atypicality 1/1 2/1 5/6 Withdrawal 2/1 2/0 4/7 The Use of IM in the Benton Public Schools Pilot study by Debra Law, OT; Patricia Snowden, SLP; Aamie Mason, SLP BASC-2 SCORES
    18. 18. Improvement in Interval Time Tracking and Effects of Reading Achievement Taub, McGrew & Keith (2007)  86 children grades 1 – 4  IM training accounted for 18-20% growth in reading fluency  Significant impact on critical early reading skills  Phonics  Phonological awareness  Rapid automatized naming (reading fluency) Published in Psychology in the Schools
    19. 19. 6) Athletic relevance Performance Training of St. Thomas Aquinas High School Student-Athletes Jackokes (2003) Motor Study: Journal of General Psychology Libkuman & Otani (2002)
    20. 20. 6) Athletic Relevance St. Thomas Aquinas High School Student-Athletes Jacokes (2003) 29 student-athletes IM training in groups of 15-17 over 15 days Pre/Post Measures:  Team timing (IM Short Form Test scores)  Team focus (IM IAR Scores)  Team mental processing (WJ III Reading & Math Fluency)  Team execution (survey)
    21. 21. 6) Athletic Relevance St. Thomas Aquinas High School Student-Athletes Jacokes (2003) Results:  Team timing  increased from 55th to 99th percentile  decrease from 46ms to 15 ms  Team focus  90% increase in IAR on Short Form Test  Team mental processing  Reading fluency increased 2.03 years  Math fluency increased .99 years
    22. 22. 6) Athletic Relevance St. Thomas Aquinas High School Student-Athletes Jacokes (2003) Team execution survey results:  Improved Team Focus by 45%  Increased Overall Team Synchronization/Timing by 62%  Raised Overall Team Execution by 56%  Decreased Offensive Miscues by 50%
    23. 23. 6) Athletic Relevance St. Thomas Aquinas High School Student-Athletes Jacokes (2003)  Student-athlete comments post-IM training:  “I am in the right place at the right time.”  “I feel I get less mentally tired at practice since we started training.”  “I tend to have a better time of zoning out all that is around me aside from the task at hand.”  “I can adjust to a defense better, especially reading the blitz and  calling audibles.”  “My ability on defense to read routes and offensive formations and react to plays has improved greatly.”  “My reading concentration has improved and I now read much faster.”  “I feel my body is more in sync with my mind and it reacts better than prior to IM training.”
    24. 24. 6) Athletic Relevance Motor Study The Journal of General Psychology  Comparison of IM- trained golfers to a control group  Pre/post tested on computerized driving range  Significant improvements in golf shot accuracy
    25. 25.  20% Overall Gain in Shot Accuracy  35% Increase for advanced golfers who had consistent swing mechanics 6) Athletic Relevance Motor Study The Journal of General Psychology
    26. 26. Research Considerations where to start…  Go to www.interactivemetronome.com  Open “Research” tab  Follow listings for : - Published and completed scientific papers - Papers in the process of publication - Ongoing Research - Efficacy of timing and rhythm interventions - Temporal Processing and Gait - Research Packets.  Temporal Research Resources are available in the following areas:- * ADHD * Executive Functions *Attention * Intelligence * Auditory Processing * Memory/working memory *Autism * Mental Timing Theory *Brain Injury * Motor Skills * Dyslexia * Music * Processing Speed * Reading * Speech
    27. 27. How to fit IM into the school curriculum  Individual or small-to-medium group sessions during non-academic periods (i.e., break/lunch periods).  Individual or small-to-medium groups in designated therapy space during periods assigned by teaching staff.  Individual interventions during homeroom based activities  Before or after-school, onsite scheduling for individual or group sessions  Laptop set up most flexible with use of mobile storage i.e. bag/cart
    28. 28. Monetary considerations  Grant funds available  Fees for services  Curriculum budget  School contracting for services
    29. 29. Dealing with Distractions Analyze your environment  Visual  Auditory  Spatial  Temperature  Smell Modify with:  Partitions  Positioning  Creative scheduling  Creative themes  Activity incentives
    30. 30. Managing attentional challenges Learning differences  SPD  Spectrum  ADHD/ADD/NDD Strategies  Motivation  Size of room  Pacing of sessions  Allow for more repetition  Allow for more concrete presentation of session material  Calming strategies pre-during-post IM
    31. 31. Keeping a student engaged Useful tools to help modify IM activities:  Velcro  Multiple Triggers  Specialized Triggers  Colored Tape  Weighted tape  Fidget items  ‘Quick fix’ items  Reinforcement items  Age-appropriate toys and games
    32. 32. Group considerations  Rhythm group with passive metronome  Obstacle course with IM component  Multiple triggers – turn taking/social skills/game playing/speech and  cognitive overlay.  Speakers over headphones
    33. 33. Session content and duration Content  discipline considerations  age considerations  modifications Duration  the more repetitions and engagement, the better the results….  however, a little can go a long way…
    34. 34. Determining treatment goals and reviewing progress – collaboration with professionals and parents.  Treatment goals: Functionally and academically based Discipline specific  Progress based on gains as measured by standardized tests  DeGangi - Berk Test of Sensory Integration  Bruininks - Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOT2)  Woodcock Johnson III  Academic Benchmark test scores  Minnesota Handwriting Test  Beery Visual Motor Integration Testing (VMI)  Sensory Integration and Praxis Test (SIPT) or parts of.  ADHD Monitory System (Rabiner, D. Phd)  Gray Silent Reading Test  Stanford Reading Test  Developmental test of Visual Perception (DTVP)  Connor’s Behavior Rating Scale
    35. 35. Determining treatment goals and reviewing progress – collaboration with professionals and parents.  IM software and documentations Specific scoring and performance checklists  Functional performance gains Functional rating scales Highlight specific problem areas Review the course of neuro-plasticity….prepare staff and families for potential clinical/academic down turn or ‘funk’ period before leveling out.  Academic gains Classroom performance Ability to complete homework assignments
    36. 36. Determining treatment goals and reviewing progress – collaboration with professionals and parents.  Formal and informal reporting from staff and family Use of checklists and verbal reporting  Written and aural samples Collect before, during and after.  Photographic and video samples Use for data collection, education and as a reward system  Collaboration…education-education-education!  Availability – whenever you set out to influence the development of a child’s central nervous system, have a communication system set up for staff and families
    37. 37. Any Questions? Now that you’re thinking outside of the box…

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