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Is Your CRM Performing Like A Rock Star or an Amateur?
 

Is Your CRM Performing Like A Rock Star or an Amateur?

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Determine whether your system is underrealized and why, and how to optimize so it really sings! Many institutions approach CRM with an urgency to meet a specific business challenge, but then find they ...

Determine whether your system is underrealized and why, and how to optimize so it really sings! Many institutions approach CRM with an urgency to meet a specific business challenge, but then find they don’t have the luxury to spend time evaluating and optimizing other processes that may be considered secondary or not mission critical. Organizations may not even realize that they have inefficient lead qualification or followup approaches, or perhaps they are struggling with user adoption, or maybe they are using the system but not responding and optimizing their relationship practices based on the actionable data being provided? This session will help you determine whether you are underrealizing the full potential of a very valuable tool and provide painless approaches to move you in the right direction. We provide leading questions to determine whether or not your system is performing optimally for your organization, and use peer examples and best practice approaches to provide you with ideas to more fully leverage your system.

Michele Hamer
Associate Director of Graduate Studies
SUNY Oswego/Intelliworks

Emily Meehan
Project Manager
Intelliworks

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  • Key Success Factors and Obstacles relating to managing change
  • Even those with greatest talent and great instruments can get lost trying to connect with their audience
  • FORRESTER: is generous during university fundraising drives and sends three children to the school.Those levels of achievement obviously don’t all occur in the initial semesters of running aCRM application. However, what should be apparent is that the institution is effectivelycompeting for the “best and the brightest” students who are also the best fit for theinstitution and its culture.Students remain past the first semester and then the second semester. This shows that theyare satisfied at the institution and will likely continue their degree process. These milestonescan be established and met fairly early on. They also demonstrate the quality and quantity ofthe match in the recruiting process.Campaign management identifies what’s working and what’s not. This enables theinstitution to change tactics to improve recruitment, for example, or encourage alumnicommitment.
  • Let’s identify some symptoms of an underutilized or underrealized CRM, some root causes, and suggested best practices to get you on the right path.
  • Identify the areas of underutilization, their root causes, and solutions.
  • At the very least, you should be able to define and segment your database according to where they sit in the enrollment funnel, where they came from, and their program or program(s) of interest.
  • Every lead shouold be qualified and receiving a touchpoint with a defined call to actionat some sort of defined interval. If you are struggling to do this or find its still time consuming then you are not leveraging your tools and processes properly – whether its because you haven’t created an automated communications plans to unburden you from some of the manual intervention -- or you’re not able to focus efforts on low-hanging fruit or high priority segments. In this day and age NO one should sit in a funnel without a response. At the same time, are you dropping expensive print mailers to the wrong audience. I do a lot of secret shopping and its incredible to me to see the turnaround time to some of my inquiries (anecdote)
  • Not everyone uses the system in the same way – recruiters on the road don’t have time to enter or frequent training, some end-users might find it too difficult to use since it has not been properly configured for them, the revolving door with PT student workers can lead to to knowledge loss and inconsistencies if support network not there to enforce behavior and you may be experiencing dissention with in the ranks related to political issues, a lack of executive support. We’ll talk more about the adoption topic later.
  • You purchased the whole seat, why only use the edge? Even if your organization did not have a plan to rollout some of the functionality – why not put a plan in place to leverage it? If a phased approach is preferred – great Underleveraging the functionality creates intelligence gaps, which compromises your ability to properly interpret and then optimize your CRM initiatives.
  • By roadmap, we mean short and long-term goals with assigned metrics. Turning on the technology and going live is not the end goal. Certainly it’s a foundational goal, but if you’ve done your due diligence in developing a business case for a CRM, then you have identified the levers that need to be pushed in order to get the results you want. However identifying the levers you need to push is still only half the battle, you still need a road map with the specific tasks, task owners, and initiatives that will help you get there.
  • It shouldn’t. Many institutions approach CRM with an urgency to meet a specific business challenge, then configure and complete the project so the organization can move on to the next mission critical project. This once-and-done approach can stall the learning experience among end-users and also risks losing the attention from executive leadership as new projects come up. The value of the CRM is in the actionable data it provides. In addition to enabling your organizations to respond to the shifting demands in your student candidates, it helps you determine whether a process needs to improve or change. Part of this effort is ensuring that end-users have the tools and resources to make those changes. Recommendation: The best examples we see are among institutions with a group of experienced system users that gather together regularly to brainstorm approaches, answer questions, or simply experiment and push the envelope with new or existing functionality. These individuals take the findings back to their teams and put it to work.
  • There are many reasons why a CRM system is underutilized.  As you will see, many of the same issues will arise again even if you switch to another CRM solution.There was no buy-in by the end-users. They were not involved in the planning process and do not see the benefit to them.The user interface is too complicated.Lack of training.Lack of senior management support.The system has not been modified to meet the changing business requirements.Poor data quality.  You can have a very well defined and functional CRM system but if the data is of poor quality, the perception is that the entire system is bad.User adoption due to buy-in and/or lack of trainingSource: ProSci, Best Practices in Change Management (2003)
  • If you don’t well defined technical and business goals, then you can’t put together a roadmap, and you won’t be able to define your database universe, and therefore you won’t have an effective engagement strategy – it’s just spray and pray. Similarly if you don’t know what tools you need to help you, then you can’t properly configure the system to meet your needs, and help you achieve your goals. There are many reasons why a CRM system is underutilized.  As you will see, many of the same issues will arise again even if you switch to another CRM solution.There was no buy-in by the end-users. They were not involved in the planning process and do not see the benefit to them.The user interface is too complicated.Lack of training.Lack of senior management support.The system has not been modified to meet the changing business requirements.Poor data quality.  You can have a very well defined and functional CRM system but if the data is of poor quality, the perception is that the entire system is bad.What’s happening in each of these stages – where are your prospects, what are you doing with them, and how are you doing it? Each organization may define their student stages differently (unqualified prospect, lead, engaged lead, applicant, student, etc), so these are left fairly generic, but this is where SUNY Oswego began to communicate how they would link CRM activities to phases and stages of the prospects in various stages of their decision cycle. Discovery – identifying where the demand is – go where the students are and casting the net to reach whether its through FB, purchasing lists, ad works, general or direct mail initiatives, etc. Listen: qualification stage qualifying prospects through strategic data collection processes via inquiry forms that capture data that enable you to segment/categorize these prospects and move them into the next stage. Engage: how are you communicating with them, is the information relevant to your target or are you blanketing them with generic messagin, encouraging them to move through whehter its to schedule an interview, attend an event, or submit an application or register.Reinforce: What strategies are in place for you to keep them engatged, reinfoce their interest in your program or support in the program.
  • We have observed many instances when a change in leadership or a decentralized operational structure results in a lack of support and project governance at the executive level. Without bi-partisan senior level support to authorize, guide and even enforce a new way of managing relationships with prospective students – the client project manager responsible for configuring the system may be politically outnumbered in his or her efforts to drive real change. This is especially important among organizations rolling out more than five licenses. You already have a full time job, how much extra time can you dedicate to training, preparing and managing system comfort level for even one new user, let alone ten, twenty or more?
  • This is likely stemming from a lack of executive support for the project. If you don’t have enough time to plan configure and rollout the system it will clearly be underutilized, or significantly delayed which hampers your abiliuty to generate any ROI from the system, if you don’t have enough support resources dedicated to seeing it through then clearly, or if you don’t have enough budget and you are only affording yourself part of the solution, then that’s also a lost opportunitiy.
  • The first three points we’ve just made will ultimately play a role generating user adoption problems. (Scene from Mutiny on the Bounty here) and can ultimately cause mutiny on the CRM. User adoption issues are caused by a lack of buy-in on the system or iniatiative, a problem with the configuration since their needs have had representation in the technical requirements due diligence or configuration stage, lack of support both from above to authorize and support the rollout and among peers to help execuite, and lack of training on the system. CRM systems now provide seemingly limitless levels of flexibility and function. As these systems mature, people are almost paralyzed with available options for changing or optimizing their processesThere are many reasons why a CRM system is underutilized.  As you will see, many of the same issues will arise again even if you switch to another CRM solution.There was no buy-in by the end-users. They were not involved in the planning process and do not see the benefit to them.The user interface is too complicated.Lack of training.Lack of senior management support.The system has not been modified to meet the changing business requirements.Poor data quality.  You can have a very well defined and functional CRM system but if the data is of poor quality, the perception is that the entire system is bad.User adoption due to buy-in and/or lack of trainingSource: ProSci, Best Practices in Change Management (2003)
  • Now we’d like to take this opportunity to present a case study of an organization who has lived and breathed this and who is putting strategies in place to get on the right path.
  • We knew what we were missing, we knew where we needed to go, and we knew the technology to bring us there.
  • Graduate Studies into full IW implementation is the lack of documentation of and training on current recruitment processes, and, in some areas, a lack of recruitment processes altogether. For example, although they are collecting inquiry information via the IW webform, nothing is happening to those inquiries after the initial auto-reply sent from the system. In addition, inquiries that generate from other places are not being entered into IW. Many opportunities are being missed because they do not have a process for moving prospects from inquiry to next stages. In fact, after inquiry, the next stage identified by this team was application.
  • Graduate Studies into full IW implementation is the lack of documentation of and training on current recruitment processes, and, in some areas, a lack of recruitment processes altogether. For example, although they are collecting inquiry information via the IW webform, nothing is happening to those inquiries after the initial auto-reply sent from the system. In addition, inquiries that generate from other places are not being entered into IW. Many opportunities are being missed because they do not have a process for moving prospects from inquiry to next stages. In fact, after inquiry, the next stage identified by this team was application.
  • Bluepring…the plan of action for the implementation of our CRM process. After evaluating or current internal business processes and examining best practices for moving forward we determined this outline of initialtives that are each attached to a Goal and Objective; our challenge is that this needs to be implemented by 3 of us each already overloaded with other responsibilities; how will we do it? What are our challenges? (expectations from higher management and perception of being “Behind Schedule” if each of these initiatives are not met on the time line) There is NO DEADLINE when trying to roll out a successful plan…there are milestones to reach along the way and there should be celebration when the are accomplished and move along to the next phase….
  • Process in place to capture inquiries and leads from road warrior grads -- get added to target and onramped to communication plan.
  • This is what we discussed last year…building the business case
  • Building a business case for CRM, Identifying Your Organizations Pain Points Developing a Plan to Solve to Make a Case for CRM.Diagnose current relationship management needsDefine the processes and technology needed to meet those needsEstablishing the value behind CRM initiativeIdentify key decision makers and influencers for this initiativeCreate negotiation tactics to accommodate the needs of all interested partiesSolutions Selling Methodology helps you:Diagnose your organization’s pain pointsIdentify key players affected by your institution’s painsCreate shared goals and objectivesDiscover possible solutions to address your painsEstablish a value proposition for possible solutionsCreates a win-win resolution across every member of your organization
  • Once you have fully assessed your technical and business needs, then you can move to the market place and identify your vendor. Please keep in mind that it is your job to push the vendor on your technical requirements. Do a thorough needs analysis before committing – don’t. Communicate as clearly as possible what your technical requirements are, and push the vendor to demonstrate the functionality in a real world scenario in as customized a way as possible.
  • Then define your path to get there. Even the simply cloud based SAAS based systems which are more flexible and easy to use, still require time to rollout. There are always 4 stages to a rolloiut – the definition stage, where you define your technical and business process needs before the configuration process can begin, then once it’s configured it needs to be piloted or vetted with select stakeholders, the scenarios need to be tested, tweaked and refined, and then rollout – which may be a phased approach depending on how many end-users need to be trained and depending on whether your rollout is taking place in phases across certain programs and schools. This could be a full time job in itself, but you already have one, so this needs to be planned around your existing business cycles – and everyone’s business cycles.
  • So as you can imagine, or as many of you are currently experiencing or have already experienced – the expense in resources – financial and otherwise – is not really about the technology, it’s managing the change to get there. AMR Research identified that 70% of CRM effort goes toward managing the change – and 30% goes toward the software itself. Forrester Research study showed that companies implementing, for instance, a new technology like CRM, are satisfied with the actual software application’s functionality and capability.[8]companies that had successful software implementations spent 10 to 15 percent of their project budget on OCM
  • So even though you think you’ve orchestrated a decent implementation plan with a defined schedule….
  • Interruptions and other obstacles are bound to get in the way and slow things town. So 1) please dont pin success of your project on the rollout date, and 2) be prepared to manage through these interruptions. If you can bring on a co-project manager to take the reigns if one person needs to be temporarily taken away from the project. If upper management is a stickler for meeting deadlines (despite your efforts to communicate that rolling it out right is better than rushing for the sake of meeting a deadline). It’s not the go live date that matters – it’s getting it done right, then build more slack than you think you need in your project plan up front to allow for the unknowns. Worse case scenario is that you rollout ahead of time and you look like a rock star. The point here is that 1) project success should be solely defined by the go live date and 2) be prepared to manage through unforseen interruptions
  • Identify the metrics that will demonstrate whether you are meeting your growth goals, If you want to improve the quality of your outreach initiatives or student satisfaction – how do you plan to measure that? Identify the metrics that are improving the quality of your initatives – establish some desired outcomes either from existing historical data if you have it, or generate data to establish a benchmark for yourself and go from there, then stop and determine what the drivers are that will create lift for you. Well if our abandonment rates are x% what is causing that? Perhaps we have some navigation issues that are causing people to bail on our application – leverage google analytics data to evaluate site conversion rates and optimize accordingly.
  • This particular rule is one I think that gets overlooked the most – especially among decentralized organizations . All the divisions are impacted by the CRM rollout, but the stakeholders can feel aliented b/c they don’t feel part of the process or -- and when something alters the way you do your job on a day to day basis – then you better be getting my input at least at some point to make sure it’s designed in a way that enable me to achieve my goals.
  • Jane was almost taken aback with level of effort she had to invest in onramping her end-users. It was not just training on the system – that was the easy part – but they way people worked fundamentally changed and that was met with a lot of resistance. If that had been communicated early on, the learning curve would have not been as steep and the level of surprise and dissatisfaction would have been greatly lessened. If we had to do it over, I would begin to work with counselors about how they were going to need to work differently. if another group had talked with them about how the culture was going to shift. What does it mean to be more proactive with inquiries? What are some tools that allow you to have more successful phone conversations?”As much as we prepared people when we went live for how to functionally deal with the tech, we hadn’t dealt with how their style of qorking with inquiries needed to change along with the implementation. They didn’t have a way to easily get at. It’s the expectactions of how they would be doing their work with the CRM. We did not overtly prepare them for the change in how they would be doing their job. We did not weave that together with how they needed to do their job differently.
  • Let consitutuents know what’s coming, when they can expect to start onramping, but most importantly, why the rollout is taking place – as part of that its imperative to consider how their day-to-day processes will change. We have noticed many organizations really struggle managing the change from simply responding to inquiries to cultivating interest and actively engaging the audience by taking the conversation to the next level – this may be done through automated communications or by simply retraining the front lines to modify their engagement approach.This new world order cannot necessarily be set by the project lead, it needs to be communicated from upper management. If you think about it, the CRM project lead driving new job roles and functions may not be well received. “You’re here to implement software, you can’t tell me how to do my job.” So the expectation needs to be set and communicated by upper management, and the project lead can help execute the change. During ImplementationChanges in timelinePreview the system to ensure it needs end-user needsGet approval from up and down the food chainThe larger implementation roadmap does not always consider each end-users workload and bandwidth constraintsInvolvement and participation in driving the change is keyInvolve them in the configurationDetermine conflicts/business cycles that will disrupt changeHeavy travel dates, application cycles, marketing campaigns
  • Over time, there will be software updates and modifications that are going to impact how people use the system – once the system is live, who is should be considered the “lifetime” administrator to communicate and prepare the stakeholders for these changes? In large decentralized schools, people use the system differently and develop innovative approaches – how are these best practices shared? Set up periodic meetings or have a distribution mechanism to share innovative apporaches that might benefit other people using the system. Sharing positive results can even create a degree of healthy lighthearted competition – spot light on various divisions or reports that demonstrate growth or objectives being achieved. prevent people from resting on their laurels.
  • Master rollout with division-specific business cycles. Reporting out of CRM to ensure departments are meeting their numbersFor patches if applicable and effect the admissions office functionality – global email. Large product release we have a meeting about it. GO over the changes, what it means, what we need to do to prep.Each business in our college is different. We make suggestions, but at the end of the day each one has a different approach. Different quirks. 1 department that doesn’t use cases at all. Another lives by cases. Another that uses cases and also uses tasks. Hodge podge – keep . Dealing with disgruntled users. Hurt us from a PR and Brand user. Because we have been having quirky issues in grad issues this director was asking if there is a statement that we. Truly bizarre – where we have crossed wires with other tenant. Getting applicants in are bread and better. 2 more schools to launch and ho. The biggest problem we have had – we shift the way we use the product to new schools. Historically have been building them out at a bad time to invest the time in the system, its crunch time and they can’t sit in front of them and play. We schedule the new builds, we still have CAS and HS for the less busy times. We ask what they are and schedule them approprirate. Until Next rounds of apps – Trish built out a grid to determine bets times to roll out apps to dedicate time for best time and testing. Well in advance for when they needs. IT’s on them – they are accountable to high people. If their numrbs don’t . They have full accoutabiliyt for completing tasks to get their projects complete. IF I set it and they don’t launch them in time. Hardline –one time only. Most of her peoplear gung-ho. Want to make it work and willing to do it. All admissions office report to marketing. Staff turnover – because each dept is so individual, they are responsible for training. They provide training guides, process flow manuals, all different kinds of tools to use. To reference and train with. Refresher or what have.
  • Dr. BJ Fogg is a psychologist and technology innovator who directs the Persuasive Technology Lab at Stanford University. His work empowers people to think clearly about the psychology of persuasion and convert those insights into practical outcomes. He studies methods that create habits and shows what actually causes and automates behavior and he has developed a “behavior model” and has identified 3 requisit elements for changing user behavior – especually as it related to technology: Provide MotivationAn ability to use it or simplicityAnd a behavior triggerHe is the author of Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do, and is also the co-editor of Mobile Persuasion. His upcoming book is entitled The Psychology of Facebook. Fortune Magazine selected BJ Fogg as one of the “10 New Gurus You Should Know”.At my Stanford lab, the Persuasive Technology Lab, we focus on methods for creating habits, showing what causes behavior, automating behavior change, persuading people via mobile phones (mobile persuasion), and leveraging the psychology of Facebook. Over the years, improving health has become a theme. The last two events we organized were Mobile Health 2010 and Mobile Health 2011. I use what I learn at Stanford to achieve outcomes in the real world. Motivation: A way to drive Sensation, Anticipation, and Social Cohesion. EAbility (or Simplicity): Is it easy for them to do? here are two paths to increasing ability. You can train people, giving them more skills, more ability to do the target behavior. That’s the hard path. Don’t take this route unless you really must. Training people is hard work, and most people resist learning new things. That’s just how we are as humans: lazy.The better path is to make the target behavior easier to do. I call this Simplicity. By focusing on Simplicity of the target behavior you increase Ability.Trigger: What is the cue, prompt or call to action to make the behavior happen? he takeaway message for designers is to map out the behavior chains you need -- the user flow you want to happen. (You will likely have more than one.) Then figure out how to get people to do the first behavior in a chain. If people don’t naturally take the next step in the chain, then figure out how to get the next step to happen. Step by step. Continue this process, until the chain works
  • Motivation: A way to drive Sensation, Anticipation, and Social Cohesion. Why would they use the system? Because it makes their lives easier! Create excitement around the opportunity, the ability to have more information at fingertips rather than ask IT for a report, takes the guesswork out of what you do on a day to day basis. Ability (or Simplicity): Is it easy for them to do? here are two paths to increasing ability. You can train people, giving them more skills, more ability to do the target behavior. That’s the hard path. Don’t take this route unless you really must. Training people is hard work, and most people resist learning new things. That’s just how we are as humans: lazy.The better path is to make the target behavior easier to do. I call this Simplicity. By focusing on Simplicity of the target behavior you increase Ability.Trigger: What is the cue, prompt or call to action to make the behavior happen? Establish a workflow guide, create a visual diagram of a step by step workflow, and be very prescriptive by setting time frames for certain touchpoints or actions to take place depending on where a prospective student sits in the enrollment cycle. i.e. after 48 hours all new leads (from an online form, event, whereever) that are assigned to you must have received at least one phone call or email – this will be displayed on your home page as an action item for you. Don’t make them go look for what they have to do. where people are more aware of their insulated role in the larger scheme of things – create an understanding of how step 1 needs to happen before step 2, and . I have had a number of conversations with people on the phone where they have no idea what happens before or after what they do. But even within their role –. he takeaway message for designers is to map out the behavior chains you need -- the user flow you want to happen. (You will likely have more than one.) Then figure out how to get people to do the first behavior in a chain. If people don’t naturally take the next step in the chain, then figure out how to get the next step to happen. Step by step. Continue this process, until the chain works
  • Get feedback on process to configure systemPilot early versions with end-users to get buy-inUnderstand your audience and their limitations Take phased approach and set achievable milestonesBuild confidence and trust in the system and process
  • Lesley U has “cram jams” and bagel fridays to encourage participationMotivation: A way to drive Sensation, Anticipation, and Social Cohesion. EAbility (or Simplicity): Is it easy for them to do? here are two paths to increasing ability. You can train people, giving them more skills, more ability to do the target behavior. That’s the hard path. Don’t take this route unless you really must. Training people is hard work, and most people resist learning new things. That’s just how we are as humans: lazy.The better path is to make the target behavior easier to do. I call this Simplicity. By focusing on Simplicity of the target behavior you increase Ability.Trigger: What is the cue, prompt or call to action to make the behavior happen? he takeaway message for designers is to map out the behavior chains you need -- the user flow you want to happen. (You will likely have more than one.) Then figure out how to get people to do the first behavior in a chain. If people don’t naturally take the next step in the chain, then figure out how to get the next step to happen. Step by step. Continue this process, until the chain works
  • Though you can be as prescriptive as possible and cinfigure the system as easy as possible, you still have to train people. And it can be a significant investment! Here are some tips for training effectively when you have a large decentralized institutions. remote person the presenter and we talk through what we are trying to do with them doing it. We do one a month (third month) but we have 8 to do every month for 1.5. We have representation, Jane is on the call, supervisor is on the call, and inside team members on the call so. This is reinforcement. I do think that a variety of difft kinds of training, combination of webinar for offsite as well as campus based trainings, once when first went live and again over the summer. That in combination for sessions for on-campus.
  • . In this regard, we recommend a less-is-more approach for end-users with very narrowly defined roles. Keep in mind that at time of rollout, your comfort level with the system is far more advanced than anyone. Realize that your ambitious vision to deliver precisely the right message, at the right time to the right segment with the most irresistible call to action will not happen overnight, so taking a phased approach with your staff is highly recommended for building confidence. Recommendation: Consider a phased approach, setting realistic goals for end-users to achieve in the short term. After each phase, get a temperature read on comfort-level, optimize and tweak as necessary before introducing new system functionality.
  • Motivation: A way to drive Sensation, Anticipation, and Social Cohesion. EAbility (or Simplicity): Is it easy for them to do? here are two paths to increasing ability. You can train people, giving them more skills, more ability to do the target behavior. That’s the hard path. Don’t take this route unless you really must. Training people is hard work, and most people resist learning new things. That’s just how we are as humans: lazy.The better path is to make the target behavior easier to do. I call this Simplicity. By focusing on Simplicity of the target behavior you increase Ability.Trigger: What is the cue, prompt or call to action to make the behavior happen? he takeaway message for designers is to map out the behavior chains you need -- the user flow you want to happen. (You will likely have more than one.) Then figure out how to get people to do the first behavior in a chain. If people don’t naturally take the next step in the chain, then figure out how to get the next step to happen. Step by step. Continue this process, until the chain works
  • Show reports that show open cases, people not following up, visibilityQuinn – cases by counselorMichele – other list views
  • The best examples we see are among institutions with a group of experienced system users that gather together regularly to brainstorm approaches, answer questions, or simply experiment and push the envelope with new or existing functionality. These individuals take the findings back to their teams and put it to work.
  • We talk so much about communicating with the customer and changing how we do business, but in order to get there, we have to manage that change internally, and communicating with our end-users is of critical importance for getting buy-in, generating support for the project and to help drive the change.

Is Your CRM Performing Like A Rock Star or an Amateur? Is Your CRM Performing Like A Rock Star or an Amateur? Presentation Transcript

  • Best Practices and Strategies to Ensure Your CRM Can SingMichele Hamer, Emily Meehan,SUNY Oswego Division of Graduate IntelliworksStudies
  • Agenda Symptoms and Root Causes of an “Under Realized” CRM SUNY Oswego Case Study Best Practices  Definition  Communication  Adoption  Optimization
  • Show of Hands, Please Currently using a CRM? Consider the project complete or live? Think you are operating at full potential?
  • Sometimes even the greatest actsneed a little help to the stage…
  • What We [Should] All Know About CRM Yeah yeah, it’s about People, Process AND Technology!
  • Your Ability to: Should Result In: Define goals and • Increased enrollment objectives Receive data on • Improved yield recruiting effectiveness (inclusive of all recruitment initiatives) • Ideally improved student retention rates Optimize tactics to which demonstrate improve response to recruitment initiatives quality and quantity of the match.
  • But getting there is easier saidthan done….
  • How Pervasive is CRM Underutilization? Ability to Demonstrate Increased Survey of 1,700 worldwide Revenue companies indicated 83.9% Increased are underutilizing the CRM Revenue tools they have in place 16.10% System Underutiliz ed 83.90% Dickie, J., 2009. 2009-Era sales needs 2009-Era CRM. Customer Relationship Manage
  • What are Some Symptoms of an Underutilized CRM?
  • Inability to Define the Database Universe Who’s In There? Applicants (but in what stage?), 25% No idea, 40% Purchased lists?, 20% Event leads, 15%
  • Inability to Efficiently Respond toLeads Are prospective students waiting 120 longer than they need to? 100 No No Followup, 10 Followup, 20 Second 80 No Second Followup, 20 Followup, 60 Followup, 20 60 40 Second First Followup, 10 First Followup, 70 Followup, 60 20 First Followup, 30 0 After 30 Days After 60 Days After 90 DaysIs it personalized? Is it targeted based on the specified program of interest?
  • Inconsistent Data Capture Across Users The Confident Road Warrior Recruiter Project Lead Student Worker Frustrated End-User
  • Partial Deployment of Functionality Automated Comms Online Social Application Media Online Inquiry Event Form Management Email Marketing
  • No Roadmap WHERE IS YOUR The End Game ROADMAP TO GET CRM Rolled Out THERE? More Applications More Accepts More Enrolled Students
  • CRM Rollout has an “End” Date
  • What Causes CRM Underutilization?
  • Poorly Defined Strategic Goals ? Discovery Growth Listening Intelligence Engaging Reinforcing Quality Efficiency
  • Lack of Executive Level Support andSponsorship
  • Limited Time, Resources, Budget
  • User Adoption Challenges  No Buy-In  Configuration Does Not Meet Needs  Lack of Training  Lack of Support (Source: Intelliworks; ProSci, Best Practices in Change Management; DemandEngine; AMR Research, Gartner)
  • About SUNY Oswego Four schools with 30 graduate degree programs and 5 approved non-degree certificate programs  School of Education;  School of Business,  College of Liberal Arts and Sciences,  Communication Media and the Arts Total enrollment: 9000; 1000 graduate full time, part time and non-degree
  • Where We GigSUNY Oswego Program We are where they want to hear us play!  Main Campus in Oswego NY  Branch Campus in Syracuse NY  Finger Lakes area, North Country and various venues in Oswego County  Online, hybrid and traditional f2f No song is the same  Application requirements vary by program/area of study -  Marketing is not all rock’n roll--blues, rap, country…
  • Operational, Marketing and Growth Pains High growth expectations from President and Provost for enrollment and applications; No capability to track and/or qualify prospects/inquiries or communicate CRM system elements needed to be integrated into strategic marketing plan to demonstrate value and get buy in at the executive level.
  • Objectives IdentifiedObjective Initiative Drive effective recruiting practices leveraging people,Growth processes, current business practices and technologyEfficiency Move applications online and improve application process management workflow.Quality Develop prospect qualification process and response mechanisms to assist candidates through decision cycleIntelligence Set KPIs to track the above objectives once user adoption is complete and data is readily available
  • What Could Go Wrong?  Built Business Case for CRM  Selected Vendor to Meet Technical and Business Requirements  Implementation Road Map
  • Configuration Moves Ahead…
  • 7 Months Later…System fully configured BUT…. Email marketing conducted via 2 systems Stalled plans to implement recruitment processes and procedures across departments due to end-user resistance Lack of documentation and training on recruitment process No inquiry follow-up beyond auto email or process to move prospects from inquiry to subsequent stages Overburdened small staff with little time to train and optimize recruitment process
  • Lack of Executive Sponsorship Project started and executive sponsors stepped back Project manager’s role not communicated No plan or executive support to enforce migration away from legacy systems and/or processes
  • End-User Adoption Confusion on system configuration, fear and trust of new system Lack of time to train No identified “new” process for moving inquiries to the next stage Business cycle timing: Project interruptions and new deadlines caused conflicts
  • We Needed Help with Process Technology was implemented, but new recruitment processes were not. Inquiries generated from other systems not being entered into CRM. System not being used to engage prospects at each stage in the enrollment cycle. Inconsistent capture of interactions with prospect across end-users.
  • How We Are Moving Forward Process planning End-users participation in process configuration Vendor Setting Expectations for Steering Committee Technology updates and configuration to meet our needs
  • Identifying Objectives to Meet Goals
  • Assigning Task Owners
  • Establishing a Timeline
  • Status Check Realizing what was truly achievable in the timeframe set Implementing many new initiatives among staff of 3 was overwhelming Maintaining attention and support from Executive Sponsors was challenging – one slipped deadline = loss of project confidence
  • Where We Are Today…
  • Training Guides and Workflows
  • Process in Place to Capture andQualify Inquiries Across 4 Schools
  • Personalized Targeted Campaigns 30% View Rate for Event Campaign
  • Analyzing Data, Optimizing andCommunicating Results! Analyzing data to optimize outreach strategies Automated communication plan to engage inquiries Reports and results distributed to executive sponsors
  • •Definition•Communication•Adoption•Optimization
  • Let’s step back to the beginning…
  • Rule #1: Define Goals, Roadmap, MetricsDefine…A. The business case for a CRMB. Business and technical requirementsC. An implementation plan with defined ownersD. Goals and metrics to be measured over the long term
  • A. Define The Business Case Diagnose current Relationship Mgmt needs ID key DM’s / Influencers & impact on them Picture the “Shining City on the Hill” Define path to get there Create wins for all related parties
  • B. Define Technical and BusinessRequirements Before Selecting a Vendor
  • C. Define Implementation Roadmap Define Configure Verify RolloutMonth 1 Month 2 Month 3 Month 4 Month 4 Month 5 Month 6 New Program Registration Grad Fairs Launch Begins On Campus Applications Go Events Online
  • Managing the Change to Get ThereInvolves a Lot of Effort CRM Effort Software, 30% Change Management, 70%AMR Research senior analyst Louis Columbus says that if youbroke out a pie chart for the average CRM effort, you’d see thatat least 70% is spent on change management and 30% is spenton software.
  • And the Best Laid Schemes of Mice andMen… Define Configure Verify RolloutMonth 1 Month 2 Month 3 Month 4 Month 4 Month 5 Month 6 New Program Registration Grad Fairs Launch Begins On Campus Applications Go Events Online
  • Often Go Awry Define Configure Verify RolloutMonth 1 Month 2 Month 3 Month 4 Month 4 Month 5 Month 6 Project Manager Leaves New Program Mediating Conflicts on Process Registration Grad Fairs Launch Begins On Campus Applications Go New student workers Online Events New Executive Level on board New Program Projects Launches
  • A Few Words of Advice Account for unknowns in your plan Success is not defined by meeting a deadline Have a co-pilot or “back-up” project support
  • D. Define Goals and Metrics for theLong-Term• Reduce abandonment rates by 20% •Increase Y-o-Y• Reduce by 45% • Reduce byby 15% time it inquiries 25% the number of clicks to takes to complete a campaign complete application • Grow enrollments in Growth X program by 25% • Maintain inquiry response• Improve satisfaction time under 4 hours • Generate 500 more rates to >85% at 4-5. attendees to info Intelligence • Automate assignment of sessions leads to counselors Quality Efficiency
  • Rule #2: Communicate… End-Users To prevent mutiny on the CRM! CRM Team Captain
  • Heard on the Street… “As much as we prepared people on how to functionally deal with the technology, we hadn’t dealt with how their style of working with inquiries would need to change with the implementation. If we had to do it over, I would begin to work with counselors about how they were going to need to work differently.”  Jane Raley, Director of Enrollment and CRM Project Manager at Lesley University Graduate and Undergraduate Programs
  • What to Communicate DuringImplementation Project What, When, and Why Change in Roles or Job Functions Management Expectations
  • What to Communicate Over theLong-Term Product changes and impacts to existing process New approaches and best practices shared from one group to another Positive Results – to peers, upper management, across divisions
  • Simmons College:Communication Management Example Simmons: • Undergraduate and Graduate Education • ~60 end-users across grad and undergrad schools  Weekly internal meetings with functional leads  Global emails and scheduled meetings in advance of new product releases  Master rollout schedule for new deployments  Executive level reporting and oversight
  • Rule #3: Drive AdoptionDr. BJ Foggstudies howto harnesstechnology Prospective students are notand humanpsychology the only customers you have….to influencehumanbehavior.
  • 3 Essential Elements for End-UserAdoptionMotivation Simplicity (Keep It Simple Stupid) Behavior Trigger
  • What You Don’t WantMmm yeah, not much buy-in goingon here…
  • Heard On the Street…“If they don’t like it, then we can’t use it. It’s that simple.”--Director of Marketing for Online Programs, Quinnipiac University
  • Quinnipiac University:Best Practice for Driving AdoptionQuinnipiac University:• Online Graduate Programs• 10 Recruiters System piloted with end-users early on Forms to enforce data capture and mark milestones Step-by-Step training guides, and workflows with detailed time-based milestones Weekly 1 on 1 meetings with supervisor to ensure reps meets goals.
  • Heard on the Street…“We do ‘cram jams’ and Bagel Fridays to encourage attendance at our trainings. We also offer prizes such as discounted movie tickets, and T-shirts.” --Jane Raley, Lesley University Generate excitement and anticipation Rewards-based system Use incentives to encourage participation and best practice sharing
  • Lesley University:Best Practices for Driving AdoptionLesley University:• Graduate and Undergraduate Programs• 60 End-Users , many across the US 8 trainings per month for various groups Project lead and supervisor presence Campus-based in-person workshops Webinar trainings for off site recruiters for large and small groups  REMOTE trainer presents!!
  • Make it Achievable Less is more! Take a phased approach Set achievable short-term goals Get periodic temperature reads and refine as needed Build foundation before introducing new functionality
  • Make It Actionable Executive reporting and oversight to encourage and enforce behavior Use alerts and tasks to prompt action Configure to deliver mission-critical information
  • Heard on the Street… “After training, the end-users are fully accountable to complete tasks and get their projects complete. Most want to make it work and are willing to do it – they are accountable to high people.”  Business Analysis/Solutions Consulting and Project Manager for CRM for Simmons College Graduate Schools
  • Rule #4: There is No Project“End Date”! Observe  Executive support/oversight  Reporting to benchmark results  Include a model and placeholders for summary of observations/findings and recommendations. Refine  Change outreach strategy to improve campaign effectiveness  Communicate results to Executive Support and get buy-in to optimize or change gears
  • Build A Scorecard To Track Progress
  • It’s a Continuous Process Expectations Evolve Communicate Changes andObserve, Refine, Optimi updatesze Needs and concerns Enable Make it easy. Motivate, use triggers,
  • Summary of Key Success Factors Executive sponsorship to endorse and support project goals Buy-in from front line managers and system users Functional leads informing the process and configuration Continuous and targeted internal communication Timing points of rollout with business cycles Bandwidth to observe findings and optimize
  • Michele Hamer Emily MeehanState University of New York IntelliworksOswego Division of Graduate Studies Emily.meehan@intelliworks.comMichele.hamer@oswego.edu