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Developing Retention Action Plans

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Catherine Anderson, Associate Provost for Enrollment, Gallaudet University ...

Catherine Anderson, Associate Provost for Enrollment, Gallaudet University

David Yaskin, Founder & CEO, Starfish Retention Solutions, Inc.

Learn how Gallaudet University has implemented a proactive, comprehensive student retention strategy by recruiting students who will succeed, defining clear pathways to reach graduation, setting priorities and measurable outcomes along the path, and identifying barriers that may hinder success. This case study presentation will offer lessons learned from Gallaudet’s own path to success see how they might apply to your
enrollment management initiatives.

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Developing Retention Action Plans Developing Retention Action Plans Presentation Transcript

  • Developing Retention  l i i Action Plans Action Plans Presentation for Intelliworks P t ti f I t lli k July 2010 Catherine Andersen   Catherine Andersen Associate Provost Enrollment Gallaudet University
  • Agenda  Agenda • What are the factors related to retention  • What are some of the best practices • Know your pathway Know your pathway • Example plan using data
  • Factors Related to Retention Factors Related to Retention • Academic ‐ Preparation and Progress • Institutional Fit  (Climate) • Commitment to Educational Goals Commitment to Educational Goals • Social and Academic Integration ‐ cumulative • Social ‐ Emotional S i l E ti l • Financial 
  • Best Practices • First‐Year Seminars • Early Alert E l Al • Learning Communities • Active Learning and Engagement • Student Faculty Interactions • Enriching Experiences • Caring Culture  g • Clear pathways to student success
  • Path to Graduation What is a Path? • Path has – Goal and therefore direction – Guideposts or markers –T i Turning points and possible stumbling  i t d ibl t bli blocks • Path to graduation should include Path to graduation should include – Purpose – Specific course plan Specific course plan – Key transition points – Imbedded support pp
  • Promoting paths to graduation • Do you know your path to graduation? • Where do students stop off the path? Where do students stop off the path? • Why?
  • Promoting paths to graduation • You must have clear pathways for student success and know  why students get off the path
  • Conceptualizing Movement to  Graduation Academic Prospective Novice Students Professional Higher Ed Institutions Practitioners Input  Environment Output  Variables Social/ Emotional
  • Making the Path to Graduation Work Professional Communities Novice Professional Prospective Gallaudet University Practitioners Students Entry Semester 1 Semester 2 Year 2 Major Personal Communities
  • Barriers Can Be Courses Barriers Can Be Courses • What prevents students from earning credit What prevents students from earning credit  and getting into their intended major? • Often trigger courses those with a high Often trigger courses – those with a high  (more than 30%) DFWD rate • F Frequently they are: l h – Math – Biology – Pre requisite courses for specific majors
  • What are your action to address this?   • Institution (culture, policy and practice) • D Department ( d t t (pedagogy, expectations) t ti ) • Course  (triggers ‐ points where students struggle ‐ curriculum ‐ add SI and modify) y) • Instructor   Reduce size or pace of assignments ‐‐ but not  expectations or standards.  If there are large numbers of failing  students allow greater opportunity for success.  i.e. larger  students allow greater opportunity for success. i.e. larger assignments with high percentage grades become several smaller  sequential assignments. Are they available? • Student (variables in input or present) (variables in input or present)
  • Barriers Can Be Lack of Engagement Institutional fit, commitment to educational goals, social emotional Institutional fit, commitment to educational goals, social‐emotional and Academic Integration • Do they: – Turn in work on time – Respond to feedback – Come to class – Come to class prepared – Use resources Use resources – Participate
  • BARRIERS CAN BE SOCIAL‐ EMOTIONAL CHANGE IN SELF CONCEPT DURING THE FIRST YEAR CHANGE IN SELF‐CONCEPT DURING THE FIRST YEAR % at least “above average” At entry End of FY Diff Writing ability 51% 56% 5% Spirituality 38% 41% 3% Self‐understanding 57% 59% 2% Social self confidence self‐confidence 49% 50% 1% Leadership ability 61% 61% 0 Intellectual self‐confidence 61% 59% ‐2% Emotional health 55% 53% ‐2% Physical health 55% 50% ‐5% Drive to achieve Drive to achieve 79% 73% ‐6% 6% Academic ability 77% 70 ‐7% KEUP FROM 2008 CIRP DATA
  • BARRIERS CAN BE PERSONAL CHALLENGES  DURING THE FIRST YEAR DURING THE FIRST YEAR % of students reporting that they “frequently” or “occasionally” felt: Lonely or homesick 65% Isolated from campus life 50% Had difficulty getting along with roommate(s)/ H d diffi lt tti l ith t ( )/ housemate(s) 48% Worried about their health 45% Unsafe on campus Unsafe on campus 21% % of students reporting that they “frequently” felt: Overwhelmed by all you had to do 41% Depressed 12% KEUP
  • BARRIERS CAN BE HEALTH AND  WELLNESS ISSUES WELLNESS ISSUES • The number of student self‐ • HS drinking among new  injury cases is rising. students is decreasing. • Si ifi t i Significant increases in  i – C Consumption of beer, wine, &  ti fb i & students who enter college  liquor goes up during the first  already on psychotropic  year. medication. di i – 46% of male & 31% of female 46% of male & 31% of female  colleges students regularly  • Directors of campus counseling  binge drink. centers report: – 40%+ of their clients have “severe  • 22% f fi t 22% of first‐year students  t d t psychological problems.” spend 6+ HPW “partying.” – 9% have impairments such that  • First‐year students experience  they cannot remain in school or  a decline in HPW spent on  do so with extensive psychological  exercising or sports & leisure  or psychiatric help. activities. KEUP
  • Path to Graduation Gallaudet University– A C G ll d t U i it A Case Study  St d The biggest barrier to graduation occurs around the  third year and getting into a major third year and getting into a major First  Return Return  Return Enter  Enter 100% Fall 80% Semester  65% 35% Major 28% Graduation Year 2 Enrollment 2 • Attendance  • Total Credits  • GPA above 2.5 Pattern Taken • ENG 101 Course  • ACT ACT  • GPA above  Passage g • Credits  taken  2.75 • Department Course  toward  • Course  Passage graduation Passage • ACT 18 or above
  • Finding the path  Where we were two years ago Wh t Open  Return Return  100% Admissions 80% Semester 2 65% Year 2 35% Enter Major 28% Graduation Enrollment Where we are today High  Return Return  Enter  100% Quality  90% Semester  75% Year 2 50% Major 28% Graduation FTF 2
  • Building the path Where we are today Wh t d High  Return Return  Enter  100% Quality  90% Semester  75% Year 2 50% Major 28% Graduation FTF 2 Where we want to be in 2015 High  Return Return  Enter  100% Quality  90% Semester  75% 65% 50% Graduate Year 2 Major FTF 2
  • Identifying the path: Recruit those who will succeed h h ll d Earned  vs. attempted credits Total number of credits  are up are up are up are up FTF Earned  credits as a percent  Total earned credits of attempted credits 12 80.0% 75.0% 11 70.0% 65.0% 10 60.0% 9 55.0% 50.0% 8 45.0% 45 0% 40.0% 7 35.0% 30.0% 6 Fall, 2005 F ll 2005 Fall, 2006 F ll 2006 Fall, 2007 F ll 2007 Fall, 2008 F ll 2008 Fall, 2009 F ll 2009 Fall, 2005 Fall, 2006 Fall, 2007 Fall, 2008 Fall, 2009
  • Identifying the path: Provide intense, non‐voluntary  support in the first semester pp 100% 93% 89% 90% 84% 83% 80% 79% 80% 76% 74% 70% 63% 61% 59% 58% 60% 50% 40% Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Fall 2006 Fall 2007 Fall 2008 Fall 2009 Spring return rate Fall Two return rate Spring and Year 2 enrollment as a percentage of initial freshman enrollment
  • Personal behavior that contributed to the  retention of Fall 09 First Time Freshman • Better class attendance – Retained averaged 3 instructor reported  total course  cuts versus 10 for leavers • Less often referred for problems ess o te e e ed o p ob e s – Retained averaged 5 Starfish referrals versus 8 for  leavers – Leavers almost two and one half times as likely to be  y recommended for tutoring • More  stable academic progress – Retained Fall term GPA (from mid‐term to final) stayed  ( ) y the same  while leavers declined 33%
  • What Supported the Improvement? • High DFWD classes (43) had Supplemental Instruction   • Borderline Students admitted attended JUMP START & continued  with Fall PLUS PROGRAM – academic coaching • New Signers continued with Fall PLUS PROGRAM – support • STARFISH  – Early Intervention identified students at risk • Weekly intervention meeting with Directors of Student Success,  Residence Life and Academic Advising • Strong connections with athletics, and Keeping the Promise g p g • Costa Rica trip requires 2.5 or above GPA • Stronger entering students • Rigor and support in General Studies Rigor and support in General Studies • The “right people (faculty and Staff) on the bus” • Focused Financial Aid Source: Data Warehouse, 1/20/2010 S W h 1/20/2010 Path to Graduation
  • Course by course analysis of the  y y impact of instructional interventions  with First Time Freshmen with First Time Freshmen Impact of interventions  on course pass rates
  • FTF Enrollment by ACT Reading Group FTF Enrollment by ACT Reading Group 60.0% 53.8% A plausible argument 50.0% 49.0% 49 0% could be made that 41.2% pass rates have 40.0% 34.5% improved as the 29.4% 29.4% 30.8% Fall,2007 , 30.0% 30 0% result of the Fall, 2008 admission of more 20.0% 16.6%15.4% Fall, 2009 qualified students and NOT as the 10.0% 10 0% result of instructional 0.0% interventions. 14 & Below 15 to 18 19 & Above ACT Reading Score
  • Hypothetical Pass Rate Distributions  (If no interventions) (f ) If the argument g that pass rates have 95% improved as the 90% result of the 85% admission of more 80% qualified students is 75% Fall, 2007 pass rate plausible, then we 70% Fall2008, pass rate would expect to see 65% Fall 2009 pass rate no year to year 60% improvement while 55% 50% between ability pass rate differences 14& Below 15‐18 19 & Above would remain. ACT Reading Score
  • Hypothetical Pass Rate Distributions  (If interventions successful) (f f l) 95% 90% If th argument the t that pass rates have 85% improved as the 80% result of the 75% Fall, 2007 pass rate F ll 2007 t admission of more 70% Fall2008, pass rate qualified students is 65% Fall 2009 pass rate to be REJECTED, then we would 60% expect to see year to 55% year improvement 50% while between ability 14& Below 14& Below 15 18 15‐18 19 & Above 19 & Above pass rate differences might disappear. ACT Reading Score
  • GSR 101 3 Year Pass Rates GSR 101 3 Year Pass Rates 95% 92% 92% 90% 90% 88% 87% 86% 84% 85% 81% 80% 78% 75% Fall, 2007 70% Fall,2008 Fall,2009 65% 60% 55% 50% Below 14 15 ‐ 18 19+ ACT Reading Score
  • GSR 102 3 Year Pass Rates GSR 102 3 Year Pass Rates 95% 92% 92% 89% 90% 86% 86% 85% 81% 80% 78% 75% 73% 71% Fall, 2007 70% Fall,2008 65% Fall,2009 60% 55% 50% Below 14 15 ‐ 18 19+ ACT Reading Score
  • GSR 103 3 Year Pass Rates GSR 103 3 Year Pass Rates 95% 92% 91% 91% 91% 90% 85% 80% 77% 77% 75% 73% Fall, 2007 70% Fall,2008 65% Fall,2009 60% 58% 55% 50% Below 14 15 ‐ 18 19+ ACT Reading Score
  • GSR 104 3 Year Pass Rates GSR 104 3 Year Pass Rates 95% 95% 93% 91% 89% 90% 88% 85% 85% 80% 80% 77% 74% 75% Fall, 2007 F ll 2007 70% Fall,2008 Fall,2009 65% 60% 55% 50% Below 14 15 ‐ 18 19+ ACT Reading Score
  • MAT 40 3 Year Pass Rates MAT 40 3 Year Pass Rates 94% 95% 90% 85% 82% 80% 78% 78% 75% Fall, 2007 Fall 2007 70% Fall,2008 65% 65% 64% 64% 64% Fall,2009 60% 55% 51% 50% Below 14 Below 14 15  15 ‐ 18 19+ ACT Reading Score
  • Conclusions based on  visual inspection of course pass rates l f • In general intervening in courses has been successful in  improving pass rates for First Time Freshmen. • GSR 101, 102,103 have shown consistent improvements in  pass rates for Fall08 and Fall09 over Fall07. • GSR 104 has shown improvements for higher and lower  end ability students. – Since the primary intervention is attendance monitoring, better  p y g, attendance would explain higher ability improvements. – The secondary form of intervention is tutoring or supplemental  instruction which is probably helping the lower ability students  in conjunction with attendance monitoring. i j ti ith tt d it i • MAT 40 remains a problem course 
  • Faculty Initiatives • Early alert • Early intervention • Actions plans • Faculty tutoring • Understanding and addressing the whole student • Faculty using best practices • The right faculty • Faculty taking ownership of the path
  • Next steps on the path • S Sustained retention of  students with low ACT Composite  i d i f d i h l ACT C i score • Standards and courses for entrance to a major Standards and courses for entrance to a major • Address enrollment and retention unfriendly policies and  practices • Maximize program and  instructional delivery system   efficiency   • More detailed analysis of high WFWD courses More detailed analysis of high WFWD courses • More intentional use of EQ data for curriculum and  intervention • Higher compliance with Early Alert ‐ Starfish & Closing loop • Feasibility studies of emerging  instructional delivery systems
  • References • Andersen, Catherine and Moses, William. The role of  emotional intelligence in student success.  Presentation,  Georgetown University Emotional Intelligence Certification,  Washington, DC 2008. • Keup, Jennifer.  Who are today's students: what national  if h d ' d h i l data can tell. First year seminar leadership institute, Ashville,  NC 2009.  NC 2009. • Kluwin, Thomas and Andersen, Catherine. Annual Enrollment  Report ‐ Gallaudet University, Washington, DC 2010. • Kuh, George et al.  Student Success in college: Creating  conditions that matter. San Francisco, CA 2005.
  • Utilizing Technology to Enhance  Student Success and Retention David Yaskin CEO and Founder
  • What is Starfish? We are.   “I made a  A Student Success Company difference for  diff f that one.” We believe. The campus community engaged with a  The campus community engaged with a student will lead to that student’s success. We help academic institutions. W h l d i i tit ti Identify.  Which students are at risk now? Guide.  Where do I send students for help?   Connect.  When can I offer students help? Optimize.  How are our services performing? Slide 37
  • Address Problems Before It’s Too Late Early Warning & Student Tracking System Early Warning & Student Tracking System • Observed  student behaviors can be  manually flagged  • As  problem occurs As problem occurs • When prompted by an email  Click button in student folder to raise flag • Automatic flags can be raised  • ANGEL grades, assignment tardiness, and  ANGEL grades assignment tardiness and online activity • Student information system data • Working on Angel attendance • Enable work till resolution • Recommendations can be communicated to  the student • Inform appropriate personnel to intervene • Close the loop with faculty when progress is made Choose flag from customized list Slide 38
  • Eliminate Logistical & Psychological Barriers Educational Support Networking System • Personal rolodex of student’s educational  support network t t k • Online scheduling for instructors,  counselors, and tutor meetings • Individual and group appointments I di id l d i User homepage with upcoming appointments U h ih i i • Documentation of contact with students • Private‐ and shared‐ notes • Relating to the student and/or  the appointment • Delegated calendar management Scheduling an appointment Slide 39
  • The Starfish Community
  • Key Findings:  Easy to Use & Efficient • Faculty • One click from course management system  (e.g., Blackboard) provides convenient access (e g Blackboard) provides convenient access • Emailed surveys enable quick response • Automated flag delivery to support services  reduces the guessing game of who can help reduces the guessing game of who can help • “Close the loop” encourages continued  involvement • Advisors • Online scheduling of appointments reduces  back and forth phone calls and emails b k df h h ll d l • Two‐way sync with Microsoft® Outlook® and  other calendars eliminates double‐booking • O li Online student folders provide easy access to  d f ld id information
  • Thank You! David Yaskin Founder and CEO Starfish Retention Solutions, Inc. dyaskin@starfishsolutions.com 703.260.1186 www.starfishsolutions.com