Getting It Right!What Message Are You Sending To Your Prospective Students, and Do They Even Care?<br />July 2009<br />Int...
About Stamats<br />Stamats is a higher education marketing thought leader with a distinct, customized-solutions approach t...
Recruiting, marketing, brand, and academic program marketability audits
Tuition Price ElasticityTM studies
Communication process mapping</li></ul>Creative Services<br /><ul><li>Creative concepting
Web strategies
Recruiting and advancement publications</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 2<br />
Are you….<br />Postcards<br />Web Site<br />Emails<br />Holiday Cards <br />Phone Calls<br />Instant Messages<br />RSS Fee...
WHY….<br />and most importantly WHAT? <br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 4<br />
The MESSAGE is primary…<br />The DELIVERY is somewhat secondary…<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 5<br />
It’s About Saying One Thing…. That They Care About!<br />Safety.<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 6<br />
So What Do They Care About?<br />Who are the they?<br />2008 TeensTALK™<br />2006 ParentsTALK™<br />2008 Adult StudentsTAL...
2008 TeensTALK<br />™<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 8<br />
Methodology<br /><ul><li>Telephone survey of 800 geographically dispersed college-bound high school students
50% of respondents were high school juniors, 50% high school seniors
All respondents completed core TeensTALK® questions and then were randomly assigned into one of four specialty subjects:
Defining Academic Quality
Determining College “Fit”
Defining Graduate Outcomes
Preferred Methods of College Communication</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 9<br />
Respondent Demographics<br />Gender– 60% female; 40% male<br />Ethnicity – 57% White or Caucasian; 17% Black or African Am...
Geographic Distribution of Respondents<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 11<br />
General Importance Attributes<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 12<br />
Individuals Involved in College Decision<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 13<br />
Helpful Information Sources<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 14<br />
The Five Factors of Academic Quality<br />Student Quality<br /><ul><li> Average high school GPA of students
 Average ACT/SAT scores of students</li></ul>College  Features<br /><ul><li>  New/updated academic facilities
  Wireless campus
  Honors program
  Small class sizes</li></ul>Student Outcomes<br /><ul><li>  Employers actively recruit from the college
  Career placement rate
  Average starting salaries
  Prestige of grad schools attended
  Grad school acceptance rate
   Four-year graduation rate </li></ul>Prestige<br /><ul><li> College is featured in the media
Ranked highly
 Nationally & regionally known
Highly selective
 Professors regularly published</li></ul>Academic Experience<br /><ul><li>  Hands-on learning
  Faculty passionate about teaching
  Internship opportunities
  Expertise of faculty
   Undergrads conduct research
  Students work closely w/ faculty
 Study abroad program</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 15<br />
The Five Factors of Academic Quality<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 16<br />
Indicators of Weak Academic Programs<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 17<br />
Indicators of Weak Academic Programs(Verbatim Responses)<br /><ul><li>“An institution’s graduation rate is a good indicato...
“I think a college where the students don’t get good jobs after graduation is an indicator it’s not a good school.”
“If they can’t answer my questions, they don’t have strong academic programs.”
“If the institution doesn’t have a lot of variety in its majors and it’s brand new, just starting off as a new college.”</...
Quality of “Better” Schools (n=37)<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 19<br />
Determining Successful Graduate Outcomes<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 20<br />
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Getting it Right!

788

Published on

What Message Are You Sending To Your Prospective Students, and Do They Even Care?

Published in: Education, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
788
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Getting it Right!

  1. 1. Getting It Right!What Message Are You Sending To Your Prospective Students, and Do They Even Care?<br />July 2009<br />Intelliworks – Personify Education 2009<br />Dr. Brenda Harms<br />Client Consultant<br />
  2. 2. About Stamats<br />Stamats is a higher education marketing thought leader with a distinct, customized-solutions approach to the marketplace. Our array of time-tested services has set the standard for a marketing partner: actionable, research-based counsel that can inform effective, multiple media creative solutions and strategic thinking. We promise our clients the highest level of professional service and attention to detail because we know our success is measured by theirs.<br />Research<br /><ul><li>Image, perception, and brand studies
  3. 3. Recruiting, marketing, brand, and academic program marketability audits
  4. 4. Tuition Price ElasticityTM studies
  5. 5. Communication process mapping</li></ul>Creative Services<br /><ul><li>Creative concepting
  6. 6. Web strategies
  7. 7. Recruiting and advancement publications</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 2<br />
  8. 8. Are you….<br />Postcards<br />Web Site<br />Emails<br />Holiday Cards <br />Phone Calls<br />Instant Messages<br />RSS Feeds<br />Brochures<br />Viewbooks<br />Campus Visits<br />Search Mailings<br />Text Messages<br />Social Networks<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 3<br />
  9. 9. WHY….<br />and most importantly WHAT? <br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 4<br />
  10. 10. The MESSAGE is primary…<br />The DELIVERY is somewhat secondary…<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 5<br />
  11. 11. It’s About Saying One Thing…. That They Care About!<br />Safety.<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 6<br />
  12. 12. So What Do They Care About?<br />Who are the they?<br />2008 TeensTALK™<br />2006 ParentsTALK™<br />2008 Adult StudentsTALK™<br />Graduate Student Subset <br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 7<br />
  13. 13. 2008 TeensTALK<br />™<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 8<br />
  14. 14. Methodology<br /><ul><li>Telephone survey of 800 geographically dispersed college-bound high school students
  15. 15. 50% of respondents were high school juniors, 50% high school seniors
  16. 16. All respondents completed core TeensTALK® questions and then were randomly assigned into one of four specialty subjects:
  17. 17. Defining Academic Quality
  18. 18. Determining College “Fit”
  19. 19. Defining Graduate Outcomes
  20. 20. Preferred Methods of College Communication</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 9<br />
  21. 21. Respondent Demographics<br />Gender– 60% female; 40% male<br />Ethnicity – 57% White or Caucasian; 17% Black or African American; 14% Hispanic or Latino/a; 7% Asian or Pacific Islander; 3% no dominant race; &lt;1% Native American; 2% don’t wish to reveal<br />Parent’s highest level of education – 33% high school diploma or GED; 24% some college or two-year degree; 23% four-year degree; 16% graduate degree; 5% not sure<br />Class rank – 13% top 5% of class; 14% top 10%; 14% top 15%; 16% top 25%; 11% top 50%; 5% below top 50%; 27% not sure<br />SAT score – 17% 1300 or lower; 21% 1310 to 1600; 14% 1610 to 1800; 9% 1810 to 2000; 11% 2010 or higher; 18% don’t remember<br />ACT score – 15% 18 or lower; 27% 19 to 22; 25% 23 to 26; 18% 27 to 30; 5% 30 or higher; 11% don’t remember<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 10<br />
  22. 22. Geographic Distribution of Respondents<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 11<br />
  23. 23. General Importance Attributes<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 12<br />
  24. 24. Individuals Involved in College Decision<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 13<br />
  25. 25. Helpful Information Sources<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 14<br />
  26. 26. The Five Factors of Academic Quality<br />Student Quality<br /><ul><li> Average high school GPA of students
  27. 27. Average ACT/SAT scores of students</li></ul>College Features<br /><ul><li> New/updated academic facilities
  28. 28. Wireless campus
  29. 29. Honors program
  30. 30. Small class sizes</li></ul>Student Outcomes<br /><ul><li> Employers actively recruit from the college
  31. 31. Career placement rate
  32. 32. Average starting salaries
  33. 33. Prestige of grad schools attended
  34. 34. Grad school acceptance rate
  35. 35. Four-year graduation rate </li></ul>Prestige<br /><ul><li> College is featured in the media
  36. 36. Ranked highly
  37. 37. Nationally & regionally known
  38. 38. Highly selective
  39. 39. Professors regularly published</li></ul>Academic Experience<br /><ul><li> Hands-on learning
  40. 40. Faculty passionate about teaching
  41. 41. Internship opportunities
  42. 42. Expertise of faculty
  43. 43. Undergrads conduct research
  44. 44. Students work closely w/ faculty
  45. 45. Study abroad program</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 15<br />
  46. 46. The Five Factors of Academic Quality<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 16<br />
  47. 47. Indicators of Weak Academic Programs<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 17<br />
  48. 48. Indicators of Weak Academic Programs(Verbatim Responses)<br /><ul><li>“An institution’s graduation rate is a good indicator of the quality of its programs. Also, how well people find jobs following gradation—if they can’t find a job, they didn’t have the right education.”
  49. 49. “I think a college where the students don’t get good jobs after graduation is an indicator it’s not a good school.”
  50. 50. “If they can’t answer my questions, they don’t have strong academic programs.”
  51. 51. “If the institution doesn’t have a lot of variety in its majors and it’s brand new, just starting off as a new college.”</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 18<br />
  52. 52. Quality of “Better” Schools (n=37)<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 19<br />
  53. 53. Determining Successful Graduate Outcomes<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 20<br />
  54. 54. Acceptable Communication at Each Funnel Stage<br />Please indicate if you feel it is acceptable for a college or university to communicate with you in the following manners:<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 21<br />
  55. 55. Preferred Communication at Each Funnel Stage<br />Of these items, which would you most prefer a college or university uses to contact you at this stage?<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 22<br />
  56. 56. Satisfaction With Communication Levels<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 23<br />
  57. 57. How Could Colleges Communicate Better?<br /><ul><li>Better ways to communicate in the search stage: (n=116)
  58. 58. More contact, contact on a regular basis (17%)
  59. 59. More specific information, more details (15%)
  60. 60. Contact me via mail (13%)
  61. 61. Contact me via phone (10%)
  62. 62. More personalized (10%)
  63. 63. Contact me via e-mail (9%)
  64. 64. Better ways to communicate in the inquiry stage: (n=116)
  65. 65. Contact me via mail (16%)
  66. 66. Contact me via phone (16%)
  67. 67. Contact me via e-mail (11%)
  68. 68. More contact, contact on a regular basis (10%)
  69. 69. More personalized (10%)
  70. 70. Provided more/better information (10%)
  71. 71. More specific information, more details (10%)
  72. 72. Better ways to communicate in the applicant stage: (n=85)
  73. 73. More contact, contact on a regular basis (17%)
  74. 74. Contact me via e-mail (15%)
  75. 75. More specific information, more details (12%)
  76. 76. Good customer service, be responsive (8%)
  77. 77. Contact me via mail (7%)
  78. 78. Better ways to communicate in the admitted student stage: (n=85)
  79. 79. More contact, contact on a regular basis (9%)
  80. 80. Contact me via mail (8%)
  81. 81. Provide status updates (8%)
  82. 82. More specific information, more details (7%)
  83. 83. Contact me via e-mail (7%)
  84. 84. Good customer service, be responsive (7%)</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 24<br />
  85. 85. 2006 ParentsTALK<br />™<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 25<br />
  86. 86. 26<br />Parents’ Role in College Choice<br />Today’s parents are better informed about the <br /> college-choice process and have higher <br /> expectations (especially true for moms)<br />Look at themselves as “partners” with their children <br />Very interested in issues related to academic quality, access to faculty and facilities, and outcome data <br />Safety is of keen, but often undefined, interest <br />Concerned about cost, but cost is seldom the “deal breaker”<br />Plan to stay highly involved in their child’s college experience<br />Expect colleges to keep their promises <br />Source: Stamats’ 2006 ParentsTALK®<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 26<br />
  87. 87. 27<br />What Parents Want to Know Most About You<br />Top choices from a list of 26 items<br />Faculty are good teachers/mentors<br />Program of interest to child is available<br />Safe campus<br />High academic quality<br />Graduates get good jobs<br />Known for its academics<br />Availability of financial aid<br />Availability of scholarships<br />Value (high quality/good price)<br />Reasonable cost tied with good technology resources<br />Source: Stamats 2006 ParentsTALK®<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 27<br />
  88. 88. The Message for Parents...<br />Recognize them and the significance of the role they are playing in their child’s decision<br />Consider customizing communication specifically for them (or one that at least acknowledges their main concerns):<br />Family piece<br />Outcomes brochure<br />So you’re sending your kid to college email series<br />Parent e-newsletters<br />We can expect parents’ role in decisions on where to go and whether to stay to increase (parents as advocates)<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 28<br />
  89. 89. 2008 Adult StudentsTALK<br />™<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 29<br />
  90. 90. Methodology<br /><ul><li>Web survey of 406 geographically dispersed adults interested in continuing their education
  91. 91. The sample was intentionally drawn to look at both undergraduate and graduate-degree seekers
  92. 92. Respondents were members of an online panel. Before beginning, respondents were screened to ensure they were:
  93. 93. Between the ages of 25 and 54
  94. 94. Somewhat or very likely to continue their education within the next three years</li></ul>Source: Stamats Adult StudentsTALK 2008®<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 30<br />
  95. 95. Respondent Demographics<br />Gender– 66% female; 33% male; 1% don’t wish to reveal<br />Age – 50% 25 to 34 years old; 29% 35 to 44 years old; 21% 45 to 54 years old<br />Ethnicity – 77% White or Caucasian; 9% Asian or Pacific Islander; 4% Black or African American; 3% Hispanic or Latino/a; 2% no dominant race; 1% Native American; 4% don’t wish to reveal<br />Marital status – 53% married; 34% single; 9% divorced; 2% civil union or partnered; 1% widowed; 1% don’t wish to reveal<br />Presence of children (18 or younger)– 65% no children; 35% have children<br />Highest level of education – 2% high school diploma or GED; 26% some college or two-year degree; 46% four-year degree; 27% graduate degree<br />Employment status – 75% employed full-time; 13% part-time; 13% not employed<br />Annual household income – 6% less than $25,000; 20% $25,000 to $49,999; 27% $50,000 to $74,999; 17% $75,000 to $99,999; 16% $100,000 to $149,999; 6% More than $150,000; 7% don’t wish to reveal<br />Source: Stamats Adult StudentsTALK 2008®<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 31<br />
  96. 96. Geographic Distribution of Respondents<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 32<br />
  97. 97. Why Pursue Additional Education?<br />Top motivations for pursuing additional education:<br /><ul><li>97% desire personal enrichment
  98. 98. 89% want to increase their income
  99. 99. 78% have always enjoyed education
  100. 100. 76% want to prove they can do it
  101. 101. 75% are considering changing their careers
  102. 102. 73% want to improve their job satisfaction
  103. 103. 66% hope to advance within their current job or career
  104. 104. 62% want to be a role model for their family
  105. 105. 42% need to due to personal circumstances/major life changes</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 33<br />
  106. 106. Men Looking for Current Career Advancement<br /><ul><li>86% of men indicate they would pursue additional education for advancement in their current job or career
  107. 107. This compares to just 58% of women giving this same response</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 34<br />
  108. 108. Preferred Course Format<br />Note that online is very appealing to adult undergraduate students, more so than hybrid. Very different than graduate seeking adults<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 35<br />
  109. 109. Important College Attributes<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 36<br />
  110. 110. Importance Ratings by Age<br /><ul><li>Respondents 35 and older place more importance on:
  111. 111. Flexibility of class scheduling (mean of 4.7)
  112. 112. Online learning options (mean of 4.4)
  113. 113. Colleges placing a strong focus on adult education (mean of 4.3)
  114. 114. More so than 25 to 34 year olds, adults 35 and older need education to fit somewhat conveniently into their current lives
  115. 115. They want more options in completing courses, faster completion of courses, and an understanding from their college about the difficulties facing adult learners </li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 37<br />
  116. 116. Importance Ratings by Gender<br /><ul><li>Women tended to place more importance on the following attributes:
  117. 117. Flexibility of class scheduling (mean of 4.7 compared to 4.2 among men)
  118. 118. Cost to attend (mean of 4.7 compared to 4.2 among men)
  119. 119. Amount of financial aid available (mean of 4.3 compared to 3.9 among men)</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 38<br />
  120. 120. Major Concerns Among Adults<br />Major concerns among adult undergraduate students:<br /><ul><li>Paying for college courses (48% cite as a “major concern”)
  121. 121. Managing time between family and classes (46%)
  122. 122. Among respondents with children, this increases to 71%
  123. 123. Managing time between work and classes (42%)</li></ul>Despite the concern for balancing family and classes, 71% of respondents say their families are very supportive, and 19% say they are generally supportive<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 39<br />
  124. 124. (Primarily) Non-Issues Among Adults<br />“Major concerns” cited by less than 10% of graduate degree seeking adults:<br /><ul><li>I don’t think I’d do well academically (7% cited as a “major concern”)
  125. 125. What I learn in college will not be useful in my career goals (6%)
  126. 126. I would feel embarrassed or out of place on campus (6%)
  127. 127. I am not prepared to succeed on a highly technological campus (5%)</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 40<br />
  128. 128. Adult Services to Consider<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 41<br />
  129. 129. Researching College Options: Sources of Information<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 42<br />
  130. 130. Graduate Student Subset<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 43<br />
  131. 131. Why Pursue Graduate Education?<br />Top motivations for pursuing additional education:<br /><ul><li>90% desire personal enrichment
  132. 132. 81% have always enjoyed education
  133. 133. 79% want to increase their income
  134. 134. 79% hope to advance within their current job or career
  135. 135. 75% want to improve their job satisfaction
  136. 136. 62% want to prove they can do it
  137. 137. 61% are considering changing their careers
  138. 138. 39% want to be a role model for their family
  139. 139. 34% need to due to personal circumstances/major life changes</li></ul>© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 44<br />
  140. 140. Converting the “Someday Student”<br />Top motivations for pursuing additional education<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 45<br />
  141. 141. Preferred Course Format<br />Source: Stamats Adult StudentsTALK 2008®<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 46<br />
  142. 142. Preferences for Online & Accelerated Programs<br /><ul><li>Respondents 35 and older are more open to:
  143. 143. Online courses
  144. 144. Accelerated programs
  145. 145. These same trends exist among respondents with children under the age of 18
  146. 146. While these may seem counter-intuitive, older students and students with children tend to be more open to anything that will allow them to complete their degree fast and conveniently </li></ul>Source: Stamats Adult StudentsTALK 2008®<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 47<br />
  147. 147. Important College Attributes<br />Source: Stamats Adult StudentsTALK 2008®<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 48<br />
  148. 148. Major Concerns Among Adults<br />Major concerns among graduate degree seeking adults:<br /><ul><li>Managing time between work and classes (46% cite as a “major concern”)
  149. 149. Paying for college courses (45%)
  150. 150. Managing time between family and classes (41%)</li></ul>Despite the concern for balancing family and classes, 65% of respondents say their families are very supportive, and 27% say they are generally supportive<br />Source: Stamats Adult StudentsTALK 2008®<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 49<br />
  151. 151. Adult Services to Consider<br />Source: Stamats Adult StudentsTALK 2008®<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 50<br />
  152. 152. Researching College Options: Sources of Information<br />Source: Stamats Adult StudentsTALK 2008®<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 51<br />
  153. 153. So what is THE message?<br />It will be unique to your institution (tell the truth – always; this is marketing not make-believe!)<br />You more than likely don’t know it yet! Ask the experts – your prospective students.<br />Streamline your message and THEN determine your delivery.<br />© 2009 Stamats, Inc. – 52<br />
  154. 154. Discussion/Questions<br />
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×