TRAINING PACKAGE 3- Image, Branding and Cultural HeritageModule 2: Innovative materials and processesGiuseppe GoriSolitari...
Intelligent Furniture                                                       Project                Image, Branding and Cul...
IntroductionFor a long time Furniture has been a very traditional sector as formaterial choices: wood have been almost the...
IntroductionIn upholstered furniture, fabrics and leather coverings have sharedthe market, with some “mix” solution of coa...
Material evolutions and relevant opportunitiesLast years (especially since middle of 1990’s) have been very prolificfor ma...
Nanotech and functional                improvement                  Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12          ...
Nanotechnology: knowledge background  The technology of nano-substances or  nanocomposites or nanostructures  preparation ...
Nanotechnology: knowledge backgroundThe technology of nano-substances preparation and use is verycomplex, but the main con...
Nanotech effects: examples….                                       ”                               “L otus                ...
Nanotech effects: examples….                                • Capacity to trap and adsorb unpleasant                      ...
Nanotech effects: examples….                                                  • Antimicrobial and antifungal              ...
Nanotech application to our clusterBrainstorming….Open items:competence of designers and technicians (production, testing)...
Paint-free wood finishing                  Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12            Branding and Cultural H...
Do we really touch and see wood ???                 Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12           Branding and Cu...
Do we really         touch and see                                                                 Paint - Lacquer        ...
14th century furniture: no polymer coatings, .... just beeswax!                             Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: ...
Can we recover a more direct relation with wood?                                                                       Pro...
Natural or eco-compatible products are now available in very effective            formulations…                           ...
Brainstorming….                  Results                      Importance           Advant.      Disadvant.    Appeal      ...
Composite materials           for furniture frames                Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12          Br...
IntroductionBeginning from 1950’s, also some “composite” (even if still rathertraditional) materials have more and more wi...
Introduction-fibreglass, or GFRP (Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer): in amatrix of polymeric material glass fibres are “sunk...
Advanced compositesNew, more advanced composite materials are arriving fromhigh-tech sectors (defence, aerospace), like Ca...
Design Process changeTraditional Materials:                        Composite Materials:- from raw material to             ...
Brainstorming…From: www.shoponline2011.com                               Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12     ...
Brainstorming…                 Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12           Branding and Cultural Heritage      ...
Brainstorming…                              From: www.shoponline2011.com                 Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Ima...
Brainstorming…                 Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12           Branding and Cultural Heritage      ...
Brainstorming…                 Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12           Branding and Cultural Heritage      ...
Brainstorming…                 Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12           Branding and Cultural Heritage      ...
SWOT Analysis                          Strenghts                                                         Opportunities    ...
SWOT Analysis     HIGH        Market appeal     LOW                                                                       ...
SWOT Analysis     HIGH        Producibility (feasibility)     LOW                                                         ...
This project has been funded with support from the European   Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the ...
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Tp3 Image, Branding and Cultural Heritage part2

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Innovative materials and processes in the Furniture world

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Tp3 Image, Branding and Cultural Heritage part2

  1. 1. TRAINING PACKAGE 3- Image, Branding and Cultural HeritageModule 2: Innovative materials and processesGiuseppe GoriSolitario Nesti "DE-SME - Intelligent Furniture - Training for Design, Environment and New Materials in SMEs" Agreement n. 2009 - 2196 / 001 – 001 www.IntelligentFurniture.eu © 2012, not for publication, only for use in direct relation to the project
  2. 2. Intelligent Furniture Project Image, Branding and Cultural Heritage Module 2 Innovative materials and processes Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 2
  3. 3. IntroductionFor a long time Furniture has been a very traditional sector as formaterial choices: wood have been almost the unique material forcenturies, apart form some glass, iron hardware and fabriccomplements.Starting from 1950’s plastic materials have progressively come intouse: high density laminates, initially for wood imitation or liquidresistance improvement transparent plastics (e.g. PMMA) for glass replacement (with safetyimprovement) coloured plastics to give a “happier” style, e.g. for kids’ roomfurniture Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 3
  4. 4. IntroductionIn upholstered furniture, fabrics and leather coverings have sharedthe market, with some “mix” solution of coated fibres to imitateleather but granting lower costs and easier maintenance.Upholstery have progressively found great improvement form thedevelopment of high performance Polyurethane foams, with easierand more efficient production of long-lasting furniture (apart fromenvironmental aspects…) is compared to more traditional fillings(normally of vegetable origin).Frames have more and more often shifted from wood to wood-derived materials in the hidden or painted parts (essentially for costreduction), with some exceptions of metal and plastic components forstyle choice. Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 4
  5. 5. Material evolutions and relevant opportunitiesLast years (especially since middle of 1990’s) have been very prolificfor material science also at industrial level, following hugeinvestments for defence and aerospace since 1945 to 1990), andmaterials with very special features, just unbelievable some decadesago, are now available to consumer industries (including furniture) ataffordable prices.The evolution have not stopped; on the contrary, the gradual openingof wider markets is continuously stimulating the development ofproducts and materials addressed to “common” industry (i.e. notdefence, not space, not Formula 1!).The purpose of this Training Package is to discuss the varioussolicitations coming from this innovation effort in order to evaluatetheir potential in re-invent products, brands and marketingapproaches, still in line with the cultural heritage every company andevery cluster represents. Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 5
  6. 6. Nanotech and functional improvement Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 6
  7. 7. Nanotechnology: knowledge background The technology of nano-substances or nanocomposites or nanostructures preparation and use is very complex, but the main concept of their use is quite simple: by depositing a thin structured layer (the order of magnitude is some nanometres, i.e. some millionths of a millimetre) of atoms with specific geometries and patterns onto a surface, it is possible to "functionalize" the surface itself, i.e. to modify the intrinsic behaviour in order to obtain particular features and/or to avoid specific defects. ≈25 nm1 nanometre = 1 nm = 10-9 m = 1 billionth of a metre Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 7
  8. 8. Nanotechnology: knowledge backgroundThe technology of nano-substances preparation and use is verycomplex, but the main concept of their use is quite simple: bydepositing a thin structured layer (the order of magnitude is somenanometres, i.e. some millionths of a millimetre) of atoms withspecific geometries and patterns onto a surface, it is possible to"functionalize" the surface itself, i.e. to modify the intrinsic behaviourin order to obtain particular features and/or to avoid specific defects.The functions depend on:chemical structure deposited: atoms, geometry, chemical activitybase substancetreating processThe treatment can be very selective in some cases, thus obtainigvery specific functions.Let’s see some examples, among the infinity we can think of…... Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 8
  9. 9. Nanotech effects: examples…. ” “L otus t effec • Repellence to water and water-based liquids (coffee, alcoholic drinks, etc.) • Repellence to oils and dirt (= easier maintenance) Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 9
  10. 10. Nanotech effects: examples…. • Capacity to trap and adsorb unpleasant odours (e.g. smoke, animals) The deposited nano-structured layer incorporates a fine pattern of cavities, where volatile molecules are captured and neutralized, preventing unpleasant effects. After a certain time, the treatment can be renewed (by “emptying” the trapping cavities), normally through a domestic operation (e.g. washing machine)• By a similar mechanism it is also possible to graduallyrelease a volatile substance (perfume, balsam) which hasbeen charged in the cavities Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 10
  11. 11. Nanotech effects: examples…. • Antimicrobial and antifungal effects can be obtained, either by modifying the surface to make it inhospitable for bacteria and fungi, or to gradually release antimicrobial substances previously incorporated in specially structured nano-cells. • Anti-insect and anti-parasite effects can be achieved with the same chemo-physical mechanism, e.g. against mosquitoes or dust mites (Dermatophagoides) Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 11
  12. 12. Nanotech application to our clusterBrainstorming….Open items:competence of designers and technicians (production, testing)competence of marketing and sales people (how to transfer value to customers)new selection of suppliers (including their involvement in product development)necessary risks and investmentsgroup or cluster strategies to contain risksqualification and approval of materials and productsinstruction to users…… Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 12
  13. 13. Paint-free wood finishing Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 13
  14. 14. Do we really touch and see wood ??? Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 14
  15. 15. Do we really touch and see Paint - Lacquer wood ??? Wood… or do we get in relation with polyurethane, polyester, acrylic, ….. ? Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 15
  16. 16. 14th century furniture: no polymer coatings, .... just beeswax! Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 16
  17. 17. Can we recover a more direct relation with wood? Protective impregnated wood layer Paint - Lacquer Wood Wood How? • Waxes, Natural oils, Natural (or at least non toxic) products • Impregnating instead of covering Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 17
  18. 18. Natural or eco-compatible products are now available in very effective formulations… … shall we try? Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 18
  19. 19. Brainstorming…. Results Importance Advant. Disadvant. Appeal (1 to 5) (+1 to +5) (-1 to -5)• Direct wood touch• More natural and healthy solutions• No plastering allowed• Longer finishing times• Change in product look and touch• “Back to the future” effect• Need of periodic maintenance by users• New experience in design• New technical competence needed• New suppliers needed•…•…•… Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 19
  20. 20. Composite materials for furniture frames Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 20
  21. 21. IntroductionBeginning from 1950’s, also some “composite” (even if still rathertraditional) materials have more and more widely come into use; inevidence we can cite:- plywood: this wood layers cross-superimposed and glued to forma uniform-thickness panel with more uniform bending behaviour ifcompared with wood, with the benefit of easy modelling intocylindrical or conical shapes From: www.danish-furniture.com From: www.momoy.com - plymetal: a variation of plywood where one or both the external layers (skins) are made of metal, typically stainless steel or light alloy Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 21
  22. 22. Introduction-fibreglass, or GFRP (Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer): in amatrix of polymeric material glass fibres are “sunk” in order toincrease stiffness and resistance. Common matrices arethermosetting resins, eg. epoxy). The process is normally performedin a “shell”, which gives the shape to the object. Threaded metallicinserts can be placed in the GFRP to facilitate assembly with otherparts. http://www.eitrade.com From: http://www.vam.ac.uk Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 22
  23. 23. Advanced compositesNew, more advanced composite materials are arriving fromhigh-tech sectors (defence, aerospace), like Carbon Fiber, orKevlar, offering new features: HIGH-TECH ASPECT which HIGH STIFFNESS is ITSELF INNOVATIVE HIGH DESIGN RESISTANCE Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image, 06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 23
  24. 24. Design Process changeTraditional Materials: Composite Materials:- from raw material to - material and product are finished product contemporary- machining process - product and process are designed together From: www.shoponline2011.com Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image, 06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 24
  25. 25. Brainstorming…From: www.shoponline2011.com Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 25
  26. 26. Brainstorming… Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 26
  27. 27. Brainstorming… From: www.shoponline2011.com Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 27
  28. 28. Brainstorming… Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 28
  29. 29. Brainstorming… Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 29
  30. 30. Brainstorming… Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 30
  31. 31. SWOT Analysis Strenghts Opportunities Weaknesses Threats / Risks SWOT Analysis shall be carried out with specific focus onto LOCAL situation (companies, cluster, infrastructures, etc.) Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 31
  32. 32. SWOT Analysis HIGH Market appeal LOW HIGH Innovation SWOT Analysis shall be carried out with specific focus onto LOCAL situation (companies, cluster, infrastructures, etc.) Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 32
  33. 33. SWOT Analysis HIGH Producibility (feasibility) LOW HIGH Efficiency (costs) SWOT Analysis shall be carried out with specific focus onto LOCAL situation (companies, cluster, infrastructures, etc.) Intelligent Furniture – TP 3: Image,06/03/12 Branding and Cultural Heritage 33
  34. 34. This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.06/03/12 34

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