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Tp1 Design for All part1
 

Tp1 Design for All part1

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Design for All is intended to focus on the needs of the customers among others also on age and disability.

Design for All is intended to focus on the needs of the customers among others also on age and disability.

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    Tp1 Design for All part1 Tp1 Design for All part1 Presentation Transcript

    • Modules 1 – 4 | 1st day Version 01.03.2012 Authors: Sonia Carpinelli, Manfred Heilemann, Peter Neumann & Constanze UngerAkademie Gestaltung im HBZ | Handwerkskammer Bildungszentrum | 48163 Münster | Germany E-Mail: akademie-gestaltung@hwk-muenster.de Web: www.akademie-gestaltung.de "DE-SME - Intelligent Furniture - Training for Design, Environment and New Materials in SMEs" Agreement n. 2009 - 2196 / 001 – 001 www.IntelligentFurniture.eu © 2012, not for publication, only for use in direct relation to the project
    • 1st day content • Welcome greetings and introduction of the seminar and teachers • Introduction of the participants/attendees • Module 1: Why do we need Design for All (2 lessons) • Module 2: Diversity and living- part 1 (2 lessons) • Module 3: What is DfA (3 lessons) • Module 4: Standards and norms (1 lesson)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 2
    • introduction Introduction of attendees and seminar01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 3
    • attendees‘ introduction • Name • Profession/workplace • Expectations for this Seminar • Meaning that Design for All can probably have for your work or • Added value that Design for All can probably bring to your work01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 4
    • seminar introduction The aims of the seminar are: • raising the importance of Design for All to innovate the design and production process • identifying the different needs according to the end users and the requirements of objects, services, living spaces to respond to them • contributing to the realization of collaborative networks within the different possible stakeholders (SMEs, designers, producers, marketing experts, final users…)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 5
    • Module 1 Module 1: Why do we need Design for All (DfA)?01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 6
    • Module 1 Design for All is intended to focus on the needs of the customers, among others also on age and disability01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 7
    • reflection about What is the effect for the companies, if they work in the field of Design for All?01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 8
    • adjustable wall-unit Screenshot: www.hegering.tischler.de01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 9
    • walk-in shower Source: Kaldewei www.kaldewei.de01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 10
    • - table with 4 adjustable benches- design garden furniture- contract furniture- bar and restaurant furniture Source: www.extremis.be01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 11
    • Four-poster bed with canopy Source: www.dedon.de01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 12
    • Module 1 „Across Europe, human diversity in age, culture and ability is greater than ever.“ picture rights not approved Source: www.adac.de01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 13
    • Module 1 „We now survive illness and injury and live with disability as never before.“ from: EIDD Stockholm Declaration 2004 picture rights not approved Source: www.adac.de01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 14
    • Module 1 The demographic future of Europe Key figures (EU 27) • Rate of the population of working age in 2050 (aged 20-64): 52 % • Rate of the population aged from 15 to 24 in 2050: 19 % • Rate of the population aged 65 and over in 2050: 29 % Source: www.europa.eu01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 15
    • Module 1 Age pyramid for the EU-27 (2007 and 2050)Source: http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained/index.php/Population_structure_and_ageingEurostat (2008) 01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 16
    • Module 1 Age pyramid for Germany (1910 and 2040) Source: www.destatis.de01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 17
    • Module 1 The increasing age generally implies (for the next future): • a decline in capability • increased wealth • more free time • less tolerarance for products difficult to use due to unnecessary demands on capabilities01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 18
    • Module 1 „Times they are a changing“ picture rights not approved picture rights not approvedDrawing: Mother of Albrecht Dürer in the age of 63 Picture: Senta Berger at the age of 63 01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 19
    • Module 1 „Times they are a changing“ picture rights not approved picture rights not approved Picture: Tina Turner (70) Picture: Sean Connery (79)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 20
    • Module 1 „Times they are a changing“ 1980 - retirement age 58 - life expectancy 69,2 (men) - often sick - grandchildren call during picture rights not approved weekends - gets along in the summercottage without running water Source: Finnish newspaper 4.11.201001/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 21
    • Module 1 „Times they are a changing“ 2010 - retirement age 59,5 - life expectancy 78 (men) - healthier - desire to try something new picture rights not approved - holidays in Thailand - language courses - Facebook users and Source: Finnish newspaper 4.11.2010 Skype with grandchildren01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 22
    • Module 1 Can your enterprise afford to ignore the demographic change? Discussion01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 23
    • Module 1 The experiment of the diversity Source: www.norskdesign.no01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 24
    • Module 1 What can be diversity? • Wearing glasses • Being left-handed • Having an allergy • Being clumsy • Going around with babies or prams • Not knowing the language of a foreign country • Wearing gloves • Carrying baggages or shopping bags • Being pregnant • ….01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 25
    • Module 1 Discussion01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 26
    • Module 1Diversity:who is the „average user“ ?Source:http://www.designforalla.se/templates/Page____282.aspx 01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 27
    • Module 1Source:http://www.designforalla.se/templates/Page____282.aspx 01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 28
    • Module 1Source:http://www.designforalla.se/templates/Page____282.aspx 01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 29
    • Module 1 Can your enterprise afford to ignore human diversity? Discussion01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 30
    • Module 1 In our present society also big social changes are setting in01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 31
    • Module 1 The survivors society (end of the `40s – end of the `50s) The economic boom society (end of the `50s – end of the `60s) The protest movement society (end of the `60s – end of the `70s) (Source: based on Quack 2000)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 32
    • Module 1 The post-material society (end of the `70s – beginning of the `80s) The experience society (beginning of the `80s - ??) The well-being society (since 2000 – ??) (Source: based on Quack 2000)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 33
    • Module 1 New social trends: • social differentiation • ecological awareness • comfort and security request • exclusiveness and aesthetics request01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 34
    • Module 1 Changes in the social context: Differentiation of the family structure • single living more common • different generations still alive (up to 4) • family members living far away from each other Large use of (Information) Technology • technological devices used for everyday life i.e. Ambient assisted Living (AAL) • social media and networks connections • large offer of information and goods on the Internet01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 35
    • Module 1 Changes in the social context: High demand of services and supply • assistive support and aids • personal services • more attention to sustainability and ecology • door-to-door delivering goods • ….01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 36
    • Module 1 How does it influence the life-style? “Homing“ • own house is the centre of social life • no foreclosure, but shifting the social activities in own surroundings i.e.: collective cooking session, DVD or game playing evenings01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 37
    • Module 1 How does it influence the life-style? “Slowing“ • return to the deliberate quiteness and slowness, at least in the private life • often associated with ecological reasons • enjoyment and consumption can play a big role i.e.: Slow-Food phenomenon01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 38
    • Module 1 How does it influence the interior/furniture choice? • cozy interior (i.e. fireplace, big sofas,…) picture rights not approved01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 39
    • Module 1 How does it influence the interior/furniture choice? • social rooms / spaces (big kitchen, living-room with electronic devices and accessories, …) picture rights not approved Source: www.snaidero.it; www.kitchenwarendorf.com01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 40
    • Module 1 How does it influence the interior/furniture choice? • „noble“ bathrooms picture rights not approved01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 41
    • Module 1 “Although todays world is a complex place, it is one of our own making, one therefore we have the possibility - and the responsibility - to base our design on the principle of inclusion.” from: EIDD Stockholm Declaration 200401/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 42
    • Module 1 Paradigm shift01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 43
    • Module 1 The Design paradigm of modernity: • the expert „knows better“ • design draft defined in advance for specific applications and users • design draft and production done for the „average user“ defined aritmethically, according to mainstream stereotypes (Based on Pete Kercher´s – Design for All Europe ambassador)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 44
    • Module 1 Challenge: products and built environment focused at “average user“ picture rights not approved Drawing: Vitruvian Man, des. by Leonardo da Vinci 148701/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 45
    • Module 1 But: the “average user“ is not existing! Source: Doose, 199701/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 46
    • Module 1 In the new Design for All paradigm: • the draft is designed to be suitable to any user • different users and their experiences are actively involved in the design process • the potential users are recognized as “experts” (Based on Pete Kercher´s – Design for All Europe ambassador)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 47
    • Module 1 With Design for All, a new corporate and economic dimension is opened up that generates innovations and added value for the companies.01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 48
    • Module 1 Target: Design for All • Improving user-friendliness • Increasing usability and accessibility • Considering all user groups • Avoiding social stigma • Supporting social, ecologic and economic sustainability • Making good business sense01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 49
    • Module 2 Module 2: Mobility and living01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 50
    • Module 2 Task: Now all of you will use every different type of simulation aids available, in order to directly analyse the interaction with the environment (objects/pieces of furniture), while pretending to have a mobility or an activity limitation.01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 51
    • Module 2 Picture: Experiencing Human diversity (Photo: SimonKesting.de)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 52
    • Module 2 Source: www.emedea.it/informausili and Blinden-und-Sehbehinderten-Verband Brandenburg e.V.01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 53
    • Module 2 picture rights not approvedPictures: accessories for disabled personsSource: www.bmsk.gv.at 01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 54
    • Module 2 Experience report by the participants…01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 55
    • Module 2 How do normal daily activities look like, now? How can these kinds of aids be useful for your work? Discussion01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 56
    • Module 2 Age explorer is used as an instrument of research within the design process in a kitchen company. 2010 “Age Explorer supporting Blum customers in making informed decisions when purchasing a new kitchen.” Source: http://www.blum.at/eu/it/04/40/10/ageexplorer.php01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 57
    • Module 2 From 1994 on, the Ford motor company developed a Third Age Suit to simulate movement restrictions. It has been used to design the new Ford Focus, according to the needs of the possible customers.01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 58
    • Module 3 Module 3: What is Design for All (DfA)?01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 59
    • Module 3 Design for All • developed in Europe (in Barcelona, with roots both in Scandinavian functionalism in the 1950s and in ergonomic design from the 1960s) • aims originally at social inclusion • focuses on development process (from draft design to realization)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 60
    • Module 3 Definition: “Design for All is design for human diversity, social inclusion and equality.” from: EIDD Stockholm Declaration 200401/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 61
    • Module 3 “Bad Design disabled, good design enabled“ from: EIDD Stockholm Declaration 200401/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 62
    • Module 3 Design for All criteria • usability for a big group of users without adaptation • easily adjustable to different requirements • possible usability with the addition of individual tools • user involvement in all phases of development (from the idea to checking pre-series and the production)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 63
    • Module 3 Design for All criteria • Respectful • Safe • Healthy • Functional • Comprehensible • Aesthetically pleasing Source: Eca – European Concept for Accessibility01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 64
    • Module 3 Everyday objects: are they designed for All? What are your experiences (or the ones from the market)?01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 65
    • Module 3Pictures of everyday objects, SC/PN private 01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 66
    • Module 3Pictures of everyday objects, www.grohe.de 01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 67
    • Module 3Pictures of everyday objects, SC/PN private 01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 68
    • Module 3 Other objects….01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 69
    • Module 3 Where can we recognize the DfA principles in these objects? Discussion01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 70
    • Module 4 Module 4: Standards and Norms01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 71
    • Module 4 picture rights not approved Drawing: The Vitruvian Man by Leonardo da Vinci Source: www.oppisworld.de01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 72
    • Module 4 picture rights not approved Drawing: Modulor by Le Corbusier Source: http://www.fondationlecorbusier.fr01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 73
    • Module 4 picture rights not approvedDrawing: Proportion of human body based on Zeising A.Source: Neufert (1999)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 74
    • Module 4 picture rights not approved Drawings: Man, dimensions and spaces needed body dimensions Source: Neufert (1999)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 75
    • Module 4 K j K picture rights not approved Drawings: Man, dimensions and spaces needed body dimensions Source: Neufert (1999)01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 76
    • Module 4 Worldwide comparison of accessibility norms (2006) The following compared data show the differences: elevator cabin dimensions (mm) accessible toilet (mm) Source: Canadian Human Rights Commission – CHC, via: www.hindernisfrei-bauen.ch01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 77
    • Module 4 1 Source: www.eca.lu01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 78
    • Module 4 ECA European Concept for Accessibility Technical Assistance Manual 2003 Accessibility standards providing a minimum level through which everyone must be able to use the built environment in an independent and equal way (based on various data, studies and expertise) Operating, reaching and holding 110cm 90cm A A = suitable height for door handles, light switches, public telephones, service panel in lifts 135cm B B = suitable height for hooks, 40cm bookshelves,.. Source: www.eca.lu01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 79
    • Module 4 Sitting 50cm 45cm A = suitable height A for sitting B = suitable height for a B>=80cm working or eating surface C>=70cm C = free space under Source: www.eca.lu the table01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 80
    • Module 4 Headrooms, paths, floors L = minimum headroom for doorways M = minimum headroom for L>=220 through access, doors etc. M=210 N = width of openings in the surface of walkways, floor grids or gratings P<= N=2 0,5 Q<=2 P = smoothness of walking surface Q = acceptable difference in Source: www.eca.lu floor levels without the need for special provisions01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 81
    • Module 4 Norms: performance criteria • measures are included in a range of values, so to be confortably used by a wider quantity of people • also used in the accessibility legislation of Italy and Catalunia, the previous legislation of Norway, and the newly published DIN 18040 in Germany01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 82
    • Module 4 DIN Technical report 124 (Fachbericht 124) “Products in Design for All” (refers to CEN CENELEC Guide 6, “Guidelines for standards developers to address the needs of older person and person with disabilities) DfA should not result in disappropriation of increasing the cost of the product, so it would be appropriate to include DfA in the design process right from the beginning, instead of carrying out subsequent alterations to the products01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 83
    • Module 4 Other national norms and standards….01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 84
    • Module 4 Which norms and standards considering DfA are relevant for my company? Discussion01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 85
    • Thank you and see you next date!01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 86
    • This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.01/03/2012 Intelligent Furniture – Design for All 87