Dita for Marketing Content
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  • People don’t want to share… want local control
  • No contextual Knowledge ServiceDigital domain is ibm.com web experienceLeveling of Editions might vary -- need more examples.
  • Slide for each chart – today & what needs to be differentApply important things to these buckets

Dita for Marketing Content Dita for Marketing Content Presentation Transcript

  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Can Structure Be Sexy? Explorations of Lightweight DITA for Marketing Content Ruth Kaufman, Brand Strategist, Corporate Marketing Michael Priestley, Enterprise Content Technology Strategist Intelligent Content Conference 2014
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Important Disclaimer THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS PRESENTATION IS PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE EFFORTS WERE MADE TO VERIFY THE COMPLETENESS AND ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS PRESENTATION, IT IS PROVIDED “AS IS”, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. IN ADDITION, THIS INFORMATION IS BASED ON IBM’S CURRENT PRODUCT PLANS AND STRATEGY, WHICH ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE BY IBM WITHOUT NOTICE. IBM SHALL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OF, OR OTHERWISE RELATED TO, THIS PRESENTATION OR ANY OTHER DOCUMENTATION. NOTHING CONTAINED IN THIS PRESENTATION IS INTENDED TO, OR SHALL HAVE THE EFFECT OF: • CREATING ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION FROM IBM (OR ITS AFFILIATES OR ITS OR THEIR SUPPLIERS AND/OR LICENSORS); OR • ALTERING THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THE APPLICABLE LICENSE AGREEMENT GOVERNING THE USE OF IBM SOFTWARE. 2
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Today  Experience strategy  Our challenge  Content framework for marketing content  Our DITA solution  Next steps
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation EXPERIENCE STRATEGY
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation The content experience trope Deliver the right content to the right person at the right time and in the right format.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Our goal: To orchestrate touch points in a multidimensional space to create IBM Signature Experiences WHY: Client situation and need WHERE: Locus of experience WHEN: Recorded moment of interaction/touch point WHAT: Content (message, POV, offering) HOW: Experience (self-directed and orchestrated) WHO: Client (persona) Event Social (influencers) Web Seller interaction Web
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation We want to create personalized experiences for 1:1 marketing. 7 Content collections can be pre-filtered based on our knowledge of a persona, a specific user, and/or the path the user took to arrive at the content.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation We want to engage people where they are. We can notice that a person is attending an IBM event and deliver the agenda, expert profiles, and finely tuned messages.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation We want to be sure our users can engage with us from any device.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation We want to reuse content across experience domains. These two experiences could be sharing the same content rather than recreating it inconsistently.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation We want to let our subject matter experts curate content for the audiences they know intimately. Content Curator Curation and Composition Display Give me: content type = “feature” with category = “cloud” “Curate” a collection “Compose” a page “Compile” a list Or use them interchangeably. 
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation We want to collaborate on content creation. I review copy I write copy I edit graphics I update topic tags I curate content for my client I check terminology Today, content is created in applications such as MS Word and shared through e- mail and Connections. It is entered into a CMS only after it has been created.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation OUR CHALLENGE
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation This is our current situation at IBM: No standard content framework
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation It’s a big problem. IBM has ~18 million public web pages (~60 million including translations). ~4 million of them are marketing content.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation But it’s not unique to large enterprises like IBM.  B2B, B2E: Extranets and intranets that use multiple-CMS environments  Brand management: One-off brand microsites accumulating over time in different hosting environments  Content service offerings: White label content offerings and content API’s  Consumer media and advertising: Original content aggregation from disparate sources Any scope that is broader than a single CMS and experience domain.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Content is locked up in silos. App AContent for Site A App B App C App D CMS A CMS B CMS C CMS D Global Content Store Content for Site B Content for Site C Content for Site D Runtime RepositoriesAuthoring Systems Author-time Content Sharing
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation We need a structured content standard:  To reuse smaller content components across authoring systems, channels and experiences, not just whole “pages”  To co-author content across content management silos  To aggregate and syndicate – sort of like RSS, but with deeper, richer structure  To consolidate content-centric processes and tools 18
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Good news. We already have one.  DITA = Darwin Information Typing Architecture  Initially developed in 2000 at IBM  Became an OASIS standard in 2005  Widely used for user assistance and technical documentation  Early examples of adoption in other spheres  Lightweight DITA proposed as an easier starting point for non-technical spheres
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation20 What is DITA? Darwin Information Typing Architecture is an XML standard for modular content, collections and classification that allows an enterprise to:  Keep many versions of content current across multiple audiences, multiple media, multiple deliverables, multiple translations across many geographies  Deliver improved information quality through structured and reused content  Experience faster response time when content for custom products is needed  Leverage traceability and accountability features when a problem is found (fix it once, fix it everywhere; inform other affected authors) Coming soon: Lightweight DITA, simple structured authoring for easier adoption and faster ROI DITA has the largest membership of any OASIS technical committee Who uses it (selected from http://www.ditawriter.com/companies- using-dita/ ) Accounting Automotive Aerospace Biotech Computer hardware/software/networking Consumer electronics Consumer goods E-learning/education Manufacturing Entertainment Financial services Health and wellness Hospital and healthcare Industrial automation IT services Insurance Medical devices Oil and energy Pharmaceuticals Publishing Retail Semiconductors TelecomIBM contributed DITA to the OASIS standards organization in March of 2004, where it is now managed by the OASIS DITA Technical Committee. How they use it Marketing, market research Product docs, support Learning/training Policies/procedures Standards Articles, studies, etc.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation CONTENT FRAMEWORK FOR MARKETING CONTENT
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Content needs just enough structure to be sharable and reusable. Examples: Article, Interview, Data sheet, Blog entry Metadata Administrative (invisible – e.g., owner, status) Descriptive (visible – e.g., abstract, icon) Body content Extensions Social tools Related content references Versions Annotations Localizations Body content Extensions Personalized message
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation The content model needs to allow for multiple levels of composition Experience Domain Content Service (Knowledge Service) Collection (Agenda) Container Fragment Content Feature A content component that is created as a whole, but is always presented in the context of a module and so is bound to a module. Fragments can be body content or ancillary content blocks. Asset A digital asset such as a PDF, video, slideshow. An asset can be associated to any fragment, but is not bound to it. A composition that represents a single complete thought which can be represented by a unique title or headline such as an article, an interview, or a tool. Features can be created as part of a Container or independently. They may be used across Experience Domains and Content Services. A standard composition of content that represents a step or chapter of collection/agenda. Containers can be typed and referred to by standard descriptive names such as “Pacesetters” or “New thinking”. A way to productize content collections or content themes. Content Services are structured by Collections (or Agendas. A Content Service should have a Product Owner and performance metrics associated with it. A space defined by a brand, an interaction paradigm, a community or group of users, and a sub-culture. A compilation of content that covers a particular subject and can be thought of as a learning program or agenda within a Content Service. Editions can be standardized and typed, such as “Category Edition” or “Offering Edition”, but they can also be created ad hoc.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Example: Rendering of an Offering Description 1 1. Collection 2. Container with a single Content Feature (could have multiple) 3. Non-standard fragments 4. Standard fragments 3 2 4 4 2 4 3 3 Page break Page break
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Summary of our requirements for marketing content 1. Optimized for: – Findability within search experiences – Usability in the context of personalized, adaptive experiences – Re-usability among compositions, channels, devices 2. Additional goals: – A framework for content governance – a clear picture of what we need to govern – A content strategy language to use across technical platforms, editors, experience designers and content creators
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation OUR DITA SOLUTION
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation How does DITA correlate to the containment structure? Collection Container Fragment Content Feature A section or subtopic Asset A link to the asset with metadata that describes its format A DITA topic Branches/hierarchy within a DITA map A collection of pages represented by a DITA map
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Example of DITA structure, as a Content Creator might see it
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Inside a content feature Features and fragments map easily to topics and sections or subtopics Titles, paragraphs, tables, lists handle most cases Specialized list and table formats would benefit from special processing and possibly specialized markup
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Use case review Dynamic personalization • Classification with DITA metadata attributes • Available at collection, branch, topic, fragment, paragraph, or even individual word level • Allow for taxonomy-controlled authoring and filtering based on simple facet logic Device and format adaptation • Content with DITA topics • XML elements cleanly separate content from display characteristics • Can publish to adaptive formats like HTML5 and ePub, and static formats like PDF, Word, etc. Content curation and reuse • Collection with DITA maps • Manage hierarchy of collections with simple nested elements that point to reusable content • Scales well: no limit to how, or how many times, content is reused Collaborative creation • Collection with DITA maps • Assembly of compositions from content that originates in disparate systems • Role-specific authoring/editing experiences against a common, content standard Matches the 3 Cs of DITA: content, collection, classification
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Lightweight DITA vs full DITA 32 Full DITA Lightweight DITA Topics 94 elements 27 elements Maps 10 elements (+30 shared with topic) 2 elements (+2 shared with topic) <p>What elements are allowed in a paragraph?</p> dl parml fig syntaxdiagram imagemap image lines lq note hazardstatement object ol pre codeblock msgblock screen simpletable sl table ul boolean cite keyword apiname option parmname cmdname msgnum varname wintitle ph b i sup sub tt u codeph synph filepath msgph systemoutput userinput menucascade uicontrol q term abbreviated-form tm xref state data data- about foreign unknown draft-comment fn indextermref indexterm required-cleanup image ph (phrase) b (bold) i (italic) u (underline) sup (superscript) sub (subscript) xref (link) data
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation DITA: Portable content for an integrated ecosystem Technical support • Author: LW DITA editor or HTML forms • Deliver: forums and knowledge bases on support sites Subject matter experts • Author: with a lightweight (LW) DITA- supporting editor on web or desktop, Word or OpenOffice templates, HTML forms • Deliver: whitepapers, articles, tutorials, etc. Manage Publish Author Manage Publish Author Author content Taxonomy Marketing • Author: LW DITA editor or HTML forms • Deliver: web, ebooks, brochures, etc. See http://www.ditawriter.com/list-of-dita-optimized-editors. Information developers • Author: structured XML editors - Oxygen, Arbortext, FrameMaker ... • Deliver: embedded assistance, help, web, manuals
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation NEXT STEPS
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Where are we taking this?  Identify pilot project for this content delivery strategy  Continue to model content using LW DITA  Process and governance adaptations  Bring on more experts in content delivery (content structure, metadata, business rules, overall continuity)
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation BACKUP
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Overview of desired content supply chain Cross-brand messaging (supporting client journeys) and editorial calendar Country SIGs (special interest groups) Planning Collaborative creation Component content management Authoring & curation Content analysis and processing Runtime content directory Content feeds from DAM and external systems Content sourcing Runtime rules engine Delivery to desktop, mobile, tablet, “assets” (ebook, pdf, XML feeds) Distribution commissioning Global content store Demand side (Editorial) Supply side (Delivery) feedback loop
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation The content framework must support findability  Findable by content managers: – Packaged for re-use – The right size & shape for composition and curation  Findable by end users: – Packaged for consumption – Presented in context of a broader user experience  Findable by systems: – Packaged for ETL (extract, transform, load) – Formatted according to a standard (usually XML) that allows querying systems to transform the content to suit their rules, design system, etc.  For all findability scenarios, content needs to be tagged (attributed) with descriptive and administrative metadata.
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Classification standards enable faceted search, while freeform tagging enables emerging terminology and connections Content Item Type Content type: Blog entry Format: text Description Subject: SaaS Topic: Virtualized recovery Keywords (freeform) Administration Owner: Morgan James Date created: 11 Dec 2013 Expiry: 11 Dec 2016 Usage User task: Compare Offering category: Cloud
  • © 2010-2014 IBM Corporation Legal IBM and the IBM logo are trademarks of International Business Machines Corp., registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Other product and service names might be trademarks of IBM or other companies. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at “Copyright and trademark information” at www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml 41