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[Webinar] Applying Neuroscience to Communications Research
 

[Webinar] Applying Neuroscience to Communications Research

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Neuromarketing is an exciting field that is redefining what we think we know about our customers, their decision-making, and the processes that govern how they think and act.

Neuromarketing is an exciting field that is redefining what we think we know about our customers, their decision-making, and the processes that govern how they think and act.

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    [Webinar] Applying Neuroscience to Communications Research [Webinar] Applying Neuroscience to Communications Research Presentation Transcript

    • HCD Seminar Series: Applying Neuroscience to Communications Research April 16, 2014
    • Welcome and Introduction Glenn Kessler President and CEO HCD Research, Inc.
    • Webinar Objectives • Provide an overview of the applications of integrated Consumer Communications Science • Discuss variation in neuromarketing methods and tools • Share case studies and experience using specific methods for specific problems • Learn the science of psychophysiology/neuromarketing
    • HCD Approach to Neurocognitive Market Research 4 • Cognitive and neuro/psychophysiological methods answer different questions  Cognitive research can address how people feel  Applied neuroscience and psychophysiological methods can address the reason for a cognitive response  One method does not replace another • No single research method answers all questions and satisfies all research requirements. Different tools should be considered to solve different research questions. • Results of cognitive/psychophysiological methods should be integrated and interpretations and recommendations should be the focus of reports…not the technology used to obtain data.
    • 5 A Consumer Experience Research Company Sensory Experience User Experience Brand Experience
    • Sensory Experience User Experience Brand Experience Sensory Experience User Experience Brand Experience 6 Sensory Experience • Taste (flavor) • Touch (somatosensory) • Vision (colors, images, viscosity, etc.) • Smell (fragrance) • Product Innovation (ingredients, new products/technologies) • Product Use/Packaging
    • 7 Sensory Experience User Experience Brand Experience User Experience • Website Usability • Interactive Digital Media • Apps • User Interface • Digital Advertising
    • 8 Sensory Experience User Experience Brand Experience Brand Experience • Brand Identity • Positioning • Concept • Messaging • Packaging • Advertising
    • Early-Stage Application • The diagnostic power of integrated cognitive and psychophysiological methods is greatest in early-stage product and concept development. • The sensitivity of this technology allows marketing and product development teams to observe the impact of nuanced variations across potential… 9 Product Names and Logos Color Schemes and Images/Photography Product Claims/Positioning/Messaging Product Concepts Animatics and Storyboards Product Spokespersons
    • Arthur Kover, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus, Fordham University Yale Management Fellow Former Editor of the Journal of Advertising Research Professor Paul Bolls, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Strategic Communication, Missouri School of Journalism Co-Director, PRIME LAB, Missouri School of Journalism Michelle Niedziela, Ph.D. Neuroscientist and Chief Methodologist, HCD Research Joe Messina Director of Marketing Sciences, HCD Research
    • Communications Research in the New Research World Arthur Kover, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus, Fordham University Yale Management Fellow Former Editor of the Journal of Advertising Research
    • Communications Research 12 - A Conversation - A Researcher The Public Words: Not Total Communication
    • Total Communication Filtered • Words Unfiltered/Emotional • Gestures • Body Language/Posture • Eye Contact Hidden • Heart Beat • Startle & Awareness Responses 13 Conventional Research “New” Research
    • Limitations of Conventional Research 14 Advantages Disadvantages Captures conscious response Does not capture subconscious response Large, representative sample with statistical validity Question phrasing/interviewer can bias results Cost-effective Inaccuracies in self-reporting Fast turn-around
    • New Research Techniques • New techniques supplement/expand current research Unmediated, not filtered Uncontrolled ‘rationally’ Very quick Recognizes the hidden elements of human response 15
    • Moving Forward • BUT, how to combine these (new and older) approaches to reveal a complete response? • And how to overcome: Resistance to change among researchers; and Single-minded reliance on the new approaches? • This webinar provides a path and an answer 16
    • Applied Neuroscience: What is consumer neuroscience & how can we use it? Michelle Niedziela, Ph.D. Neuroscientist and Chief Methodologist, HCD Research
    • How do people see, interpret and behave in the world? 18 Non-conscious Conscious Speak & Act Deliberate & Analyze Determine Meaning & Value Form Impressions What is Applied Consumer Neuroscience?
    • •Psychology  Self-report, questionnaire, psychoanalysis  Assumes people can consciously access why they feel a certain way •Neuroscience  People don’t know why  “why” is not constant  May never be aware 19 Why not just ask?
    • 20 Peripheral Nervous System Central Nervous System (Brain & Spinal Cord) What How Blood Flow fMRI Electrical Activity EEG Choice Behavioral Experiments Applied Consumer Neuroscience Methods What How Facial Expressions Automated/ Expert Coding Facial Muscle Movement EMG Eye Movement Eye Tracking Perspiration EDA, SCR, GSR Heart Rate Respiration EKG, strain gage Cognitive Accessibility Behavioral Response Time
    • 21 = FEAR Psychology & Emotion: Discrete
    • 22 Multi-Modal Approach • Visual depiction of the "emotional distance" between experiences • Divided into two or three dimensions known as valences (how negative or positive the experience was), arousal (extent of reaction to stimuli) and approach/avoidance • These dimensions can be depicted on a 2D or 3D coordinate map Psychology & Emotion: Multidimensional Arousal Approach/ Avoidance Emotional Valence
    • Pleasantness Arousal PleasantUnpleasant Mild Intense 23 Bored Miserable Angry Afraid Happy Astonished Glad Relaxed Tired Content Sad Distressed Disgust
    • Arousal Approach/ Avoidance Emotional Valence neutral pleasant happy surprised ecstatic excitementinterested enjoyment 24
    • 25 What How Facial Expressions Automated/ Expert Coding Facial Muscle Movement EMG Eye Movement Eye Tracking Perspiration EDA, SCR, GSR Heart Rate Respiration EKG, strain gage Cognitive Accessibility Behavioral Response Time Classification View Emotional Valence Attention Arousal Approach/ Withdrawal Arousal Approach/ Avoidance Emotional Valence Implicit Testing Applied Consumer Neuroscience Methods Peripheral Nervous System
    • 26 fMRI – Academic neuroscience research • Great for spatial, structural resolution • Emotion:  Amygdala – emotional significance, basic needs (fear)  Thalamus – wakefulness & relay  Hypothalamus – hormones, nts (reward, arousal)  Hippocampus – memory  Fornix – output for memory, executive function  Mammillary body – memory  Olfactory bulb – smell  Cingulate gyrus – affect, motor/muscle control, attention, emotional awareness/consciousness  Basal ganglia – motivation  Orbitofrontal cortex – decision/emotions  Prefrontal cortex – anticipating, regulating emotions  Ventral striatum – emotion/behavior  Nucleus accumbens – goal directed emotion, addiction  Insula – body emotion (PNS), taste (disgust)  Cerebellum – emotional regulation  ETC… Neuroscience & Emotion: fMRI
    • 27 Neuroscience & Emotion: fMRI
    • 28 Neuroscience & Emotion: EEG
    • 29 Central Nervous System (Brain & Spinal Cord) What How Blood Flow fMRI Electrical Activity EEG Choice Behavioral Experiments Applied Consumer Neuroscience Methods Emotional Valence Structure/ Anatomy
    • 30 What How Facial Expressions Automated/ Expert Coding Facial Muscle Movement EMG Eye Movement Eye Tracking Perspiration EDA, SCR, GSR Heart Rate Respiration EKG, strain gage Cognitive Accessibility Behavioral Response Time Peripheral Nervous System Central Nervous System (Brain & Spinal Cord) What How Blood Flow fMRI Electrical Activity EEG Choice Behavioral Experiments Applied Consumer Neuroscience Methods
    • Follow me on twitter: @HCDNeuroscience Find me on LinkedIn: Michelle Niedziela Email me: michelle.niedziela@hcdi.net
    • Media Psychophysiology: The pathway to valid and valuable Biometric Marketing Science Professor Paul Bolls, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Strategic Communication, Missouri School of Journalism Co-Director, PRIME LAB, Missouri School of Journalism Scientific Consultant, HCD Research
    • 33 Validity Validity depends on basic science targeted at determining the psychological meaning of nervous system activity PRACTICAL BENEFIT Value Value depends on identifying specific biometric measures that index concepts critical to effective brand communication and insightful data analysis Biometric Research “Value Proposition”
    • 34 Media content ‘the stimulus’ Delivered via a new interactive technology ‘into the mind’ of the audience Emerging effects ‘the response’ Intervening process embodied in the brain leads to… Approach observes brain activity in real time as consumers experience and interact with brand messages offering insight into how and why messages succeed or fail Media use is a dynamic across time interaction between embodied ‘mind’ and ‘media’ The Biometric Marketing Communication Science Paradigm Media use engages ‘intervening processes’ in cognitive / emotional form, observable though psychophysiological measures (e.g. EEG, cardiac activity)
    • Measuring “Mental Experience” with Brand Communication 35 Qualitative Interview, Self-report Scales, And Behavioral Observation Memory Tests Biometric Measures Eye Tracking Dynamic Processes Model of Mediated Message Processing Complex social environment consisting of across-time interactions between messages and message receiver
    • Biometrics Impact Score 36 BIOMETRICS IMPACT SCORE Stopping Power (First 6 Seconds) Magnitude of the Orienting Response as a composite measure of Cardiac Deceleration (Heart rate) + Arousal (GSR) + Emotion* (Facial EMG) In The First Six (6) Seconds • Extent to which an ad is likely to succeed at capturing attention in a cluttered advertising environment Sustained Positive Engagement Composite measure of Cardiac Deceleration (Heart rate) + Arousal (GSR) + Emotion* (Facial EMG) For The Remainder of Exposure • Extent to which an ad is likely to maintain attention and relatively strong levels of arousal with desired emotional response Brand Immersion Composite measure of Cardiac Deceleration (Heart rate) + Arousal (GSR) + Emotion (Facial EMG) During Branding Moments** • Extent to which an ad evokes a brand-favorable response during presentation of the branding elements Biometrics Impact Score The Composite Score of All Three Metrics * The use of Positive Emotion as measured by Facial EMG is determined by the Creative Brief ** All ads featured a single primary branding moment in the last 6 seconds of the exposure.
    • Biometrics Graph Interpretation 37 A decrease in heart rate indicates viewers are paying attention to the content. An increase in heart rate indicates viewers are accessing memories and are not attending to details in content. An increase in arousal is most likely due to a more conscious level of interest. However, it is critical to remember that interest is not the same as attention. Arousal usually tapers off over time. It is important to consider positive and negative emotion as independent responses. Any increase or decrease in one response does not automatically result in the opposite response in the other. This is known as coactive emotional response. X Axis = Rate of Change Y Axis = Length of Exposure (sec)
    • 38 Message testing (ads, concepts, positioning) Communication Contexts for Holistic Biometric Marketing Research Branded content optimization Entertainment / Information content testing Website optimization Digital, interactive, mobile platform testing Product sensory experience
    • Integrated Research in Action Joe Messina Director of Marketing Sciences, HCD Research
    • Case Study: Commercial Testing 2013-2014 Campaign
    • Biometrics Impact Score* Vs. Clutter • GE is the most effective of these ads at driving attention, engagement and positive emotion, and thus achieves a Biometrics Impact Score that is much greater than the HCD Benchmark. • Toyota achieves a Biometrics Impact Score of 1.3, which is weaker than the HCD Benchmark, as well as commercials placed in clutter. 41 *Composite measure of Brand Positive Stopping Power, Sustained Positive Engagement and Brand Immersion 1.0 1.3 6.4 3.8 7.2 3.7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Taco Bell Toyota Swiffer Old Spice GE HCD BENCHMARK BIOMETRICS IMPACT SCORE*
    • Emotional Diagnosis Over Time (Biometrics) • The introduction (lobby scene) does not create an emotional response, which is detrimental to the commercial’s performance as it could lead to loss of engagement before the main message is revealed. • Once the message (the financial offer) is revealed , there is a meaningful emotional response. 42 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 PositiveFacialEMG ChangefromBaseline Positive Emotional Response Negative Emotional Response Indicates statistically significantly superior/inferior to the HCD Benchmark Call-To-Action (Top 2 Box) Toyota (n=150) HCD Benchmark Prompts Me to Seek Additional Information 42% 30% Likelihood to Talk to Friends and Family About Commercial 38% 33%
    • Case Study: Ad Concept Campaign
    • Purpose: • To understand which concept most effectively drives a relevant emotional response to the product and motivates trial purchase. • The messages are identical for each ad. • The visual depiction of the message is different and is the focus of the test. Methodology: • Integration of Biometrics and Eye-Tracking with traditional quantitative survey methods Selecting a Lead Concept For New Ad Campaign
    • Emotional Response to Ad Concepts 1 2 3 4 5 EMOTIONAL IMPACT • The emotional response of Concept A is more positive, while the Concept B shows higher negative emotion driven by graphic element 2 and the bottom graphic element 3. 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 Increases in negative responseHigher positive response Concept A Concept B Positive Negative 1 2 3 4 5
    • CALL-TO-ACTION Call-to-Action Measures Concept A (n=101) A Concept B (n=103) B Motivates to purchase Product X Top-2 Box 79% 65% Motivates seek additional information Top-2 Box 75% 63% Motivates to Visit the Website Top-2 Box 65% 61% Driving Factors for Call-to-Action Concept A (n=101) A Concept B (n=103) B Message Effectiveness Clarity/Ease in Understanding Top-2 Box 81% 77% Relevance Top-2 Box 90% 80% Other Measures % Found Aspects that Encourage to Seek Additional Information 72% 58%Concept A Concept B Positive Negative More positive emotion can be linked to viewers thinking the graphics are more encouraging. Which Concept Is The Winner? • The stronger positive emotional response to the visual elements of Concept A leads to more effective communication and ultimately higher motivation toward purchase.
    • Case Study: Testing Video Advertising within Website Environments
    • Purpose: • To understand how consumers engage with online video advertisements across different website environments. • Provide insight for branded web property owner to provide its advertising clients with a data story to prove that ads placed in branded content are more effective than when placed in generic sites. Methodology: • Integration of Biometrics and Eye-Tracking with traditional quantitative survey methods • A mix of videos were utilized across all environments to ensure a robust market mix of consumers. • Consumers were between the ages of 25-54 years old. • Must watch videos on the Internet at least once a week. Testing Video Advertising within Website Environments
    • Branded 1 User Generated Video (UGV) Test Materials
    • To be as brave as the people we help -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 ATTENTION -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 AROUSAL/INTENSITY -0.5 -0.25 0 0.25 0.5 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 POSITIVE NEGATIVE The large black border serves to keep viewer’s attention locked up in the ad window. AD ENGAGEMENT LOW MODERATE HIGHBiometrics for Branded Website • Ads placed in a relevant context on a branded website are more engaging.
    • To be as brave as the people we help -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 ATTENTION -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 AROUSAL -0.5 -0.25 0 0.25 0.5 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 POSITIVE NEGATIVE Some visual engagement on the ad is lost to surrounding content. AD ENGAGEMENT LOW MODERATE HIGH Biometrics for UGV Website • Ads placed in the User Generated Video environment do not effectively grab attention.
    • Key Metrics Branded 1 A UGV B Biometrics Attention Arousal Emotion Ad Recall % Unaided % Aided Call-To-Action Purchase Interest (top 2 box) Click on the Ad Search to find out more Other Communication (Top 2 Box) Impression of the Brand Is More Favorable After Viewing Ad in Website Environment Ad Fit with Website Environment Ad Is Relevant to Website Results from Key Metrics • While ads placed in generic UGV sites can potentially get more traffic, ads placed in contextually relevant, branded sites get more attention that is sustained, and therefore are more memorable and motivating.
    • You have Questions? We have Answers! Please enter your questions now, or feel free to contact us individually: Glenn Kessler: Glenn.Kessler@hcdi.net Arthur Kover: ArthurKover@gmail.com Michelle Niedziela: Michelle.Niedziela@hcdi.net Paul Bolls: MediaBrain99@gmail.com Joe Messina: Joe.Messina@hcdi.net