Building a Great Presentation

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Chris Burry EIA

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  • F1: What is the ideal customer to target for interviewsESTABLISH CONCEPT OF EARLY EVANGELISTF2: How do you find these guys?
  • How many customer interviews do you think you need?How many contacts to get xx interviews?How many minutes per interview?What is a good goal per week?
  • F1: Don’t start with your high-value targets – WHY NOT?F1: How could we refine this as we conduct more and more interviews:The problem: ?Demographics: ?Alternative solutions?Positioning?Build a pipeline?
  • Building a Great Presentation

    1. 1. Building a Great Presentation Chris Burry Co-CEO US Market Access Center EIA – July 10, 2013
    2. 2. 1. People 2. Purpose 3. Preparation 4. Practice © USMAC 2013 - 2 - Great Presentations Begin with 4 P’s…
    3. 3. You are not presenting to machines You must be HUMAN You need to make a connection with your audience You must ‘know’ your audience and what motivates them © USMAC 2013 - 3 - It all starts with people….
    4. 4. We talked earlier about the psychology of sales.. What is their motivation for being here? What do we know about them as people? © USMAC 2013 - 4 - What do I mean by knowing your audience
    5. 5. People buy from people they like… If they don’t like you, it really doesn’t matter how good your product is…. © USMAC 2013 - 5 - The “Little Secret” of Selling …
    6. 6. You need to be VERY clear on what you are trying to get done. o Gather Feedback? o Figure out what their problems are? o See if there is interest in your problem? There is a HUGE risk of over-reaching © USMAC 2013 - 6 - Purpose – What are we trying to get done?
    7. 7. The Single Meeting Objective As a rule, you only get a single meeting objective. Think in terms of a series of passes, not trying to score now. What pass am I going to make? © USMAC 2013 - 7 -
    8. 8. The Single Meeting Objective What pass am I going to make? And how is it going to get me closer to the goal? What is the one thing I want my audience to remember / do? And no, it can’t be place an order today. © USMAC 2013 - 8 -
    9. 9. Concise - Less is more o 3 min per slide o 30 point type o Not 24, not 18, not 12 Clear - No jargon, acronyms Consistent – Same font, layout, bullets Think ZEN © USMAC 2013 - 9 - Preparation – Your materials must be
    10. 10. Just like there is a single meeting objective… Each slide has to have an objective as well. And in a perfect world, a picture to reinforce the words © USMAC 2013 - 10 - Each slide gets to share ONE idea
    11. 11. 1. Title Slide o Presenter(s) o Title o Date o Logo © USMAC 2013 - 11 - My standard slides
    12. 12. 1. Title Area (typically in a colored font) 2. Content Area 3. San Serif Font (30 pts!) 4. Black text, color for emphasis 5. Picture / graphic if possible 6. Logo 7. Copyright and page number 8. Contact information © USMAC 2013 - 12 - Standard Slide Elements
    13. 13. Do you want to be celebrating success or Accepting failure? © USMAC 2013 - 13 - Which Outcome Do You Want?
    14. 14. or © USMAC 2013 - 14 - Which Outcome Do You Want?
    15. 15. 1. Introductions o Your Team o Their Team 2. Purpose of the meeting / presentation o Describe the single objective o Confirm that this is an acceptable outcome o Explain how the rest of the meeting will work © USMAC 2013 - 15 - The Actual Slides
    16. 16. 3. Content – The ‘meat’ of the presentation o Varies by type of meeting o Resist the urge to ‘shoot for the goal’ 4. Questions, Answers and Discussion 5. Call to Action – This is where you put ‘the ask’ o What do you want to have happen next? o When is this supposed to happen 6. Contact information © USMAC 2013 - 16 - The Actual Slides
    17. 17. The Single Objective – Validate top 3 problems Get a ranking for each problem Validate the customer segments Understand alternative solutions Identify new problems This is about listening to the customer, not about you talking all the time © USMAC 2013 - 17 - The Customer Problem Interview
    18. 18. Who to Target for Interviews Budget Has makeshift solution Actively looking for solution Awareness of problem Has the problem you are solving Reading: Startup Owner’s Manual Work from the bottom up
    19. 19. © USMAC 2013 - 19 - The Meeting Agenda and Format 2 mins •Introductions – tee it up 2 mins •Customer persona 2 mins •Tell a customer story 20 mins •Customer problem discussion 4 mins •Wrap up, referrals, follow-up
    20. 20. Your worksheet © USMAC 2013 - 20 - Customer Problem Discussion Problem Candidates Current Solution Our Solution 1. 1. 1. 2. 2. 2. 3. 3. 3. 4. 4. 4. 5. 5. 5. Source: Steve Blank, STARTUP OWNERS MANUAL
    21. 21. Contact info, role in company, organization Company demographics Hypothesis 1: o Priority of underlying problem o Pass or Fail o Alternative solution to problem © USMAC 2013 - 21 - Problem Interview Journal Hypothesis Hypothesis 3…. New top problems identified Referrals Follow-ups Things you hadn’t thought of
    22. 22. How Many Customer Interviews Do YOU Need? 50 interviews total 15 per week, 300 minutes 200 contacts Steve Blank numbers © USMAC 2013 - 22 -
    23. 23. Learn… Learn…. Learn…. Don’t go to high-value targets first Adjust the problem set Tune the demographics Zoom in on top alternatives Re-use customers’ own words Target “early evangelist” customers Refine As You Go © USMAC 2013 - 23 -
    24. 24. You will know when 10 .. 50 Interviews Problem consensus about urgent need Insight into current solutions Understand demographic of early evangelist Hearing the same things over and over When Are You Done? © USMAC 2013 - 24 -
    25. 25. Customer problem What is the problem you are trying to solve? o Get the customer talking o You need to validate that the customer actually has this problem. o If they don’t visit was a waste o NEVER lead with your technology / solution! o Always let the customer talk © USMAC 2013 - 25 - Content Slides – Assuming this is a Validation Call
    26. 26. Value proposition Describe that an ‘imagined future’ would their world look like if the problem didn’t exist o Quantify the change if possible o Great place to ‘connect’ with them o You need them to ‘buy in’ to the idea that the end result is better than what they have today. © USMAC 2013 - 26 - Content Slides – Assuming this is a Validation Call
    27. 27. What is your solution You need to describe your solution and how it will make their problem / pain go away o Keep it short and simple, o The ‘technical brilliance’ of your idea doesn’t really matter to them o Let them ask questions on the details © USMAC 2013 - 27 - Content Slides – Assuming this is a Validation Call
    28. 28. Competitive Advantage Why is your product best suited to make this problem go away o When possible, you want to compare and contrast with existing solutions o Advantage must be quantifiable  30% faster vs. ‘much faster’ o As ‘the new guy’ you are high risk  Your value must offset the risk © USMAC 2013 - 28 - Content Slides – Assuming this is a Sales Call
    29. 29. Implementation Plan / Details o Resist the urge to ‘deep dive’ o Cost goes here Questions, Answers and Discussion o This is where you get your validated learning Call to Action – This is where you put ‘the ask’ o What do you want to have happen next? Contact information © USMAC 2013 - 29 - Content Slides – Other topics
    30. 30. Build a profile of your ‘target’ Decide on team roles o Who is going to take notes o Who is going to ask questions Schedule a ‘de-brief’ ASAP after the meeting © USMAC 2013 - 30 - Preparation
    31. 31. Don’t “go in cold” Practice the slides you will present at least 5 times before you meet a customer o Practice in front of your team o Practice in front of our dog o Practice in front of the mirror © USMAC 2013 - 31 - Practice
    32. 32. Let’s Connect US Market Access Center 10 South Third Street, 3rd Floor San Jose, CA 95113 Our Headquarters facebook.com/usmarketaccess @usmarketaccess linkedin.com Groups – US Market Access Center San Francisco Palo Alto San Jose +1 (214) 673-5187 Phone cburry@usmarketaccess.com Email Chris Burry Co-CEO Contact www.usmarketaccess.com © USMAC 2013 - 32 -

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