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Upper extremity pathology

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Aqui se presentan patologias y fracturas de las extremidades superiores.

Aqui se presentan patologias y fracturas de las extremidades superiores.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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  • 1. Radiographic Pathology of the Upper Extremity Jeff Ahrendsen Dennis Winders
  • 2. Healing Fracture Stage I
  • 3. Healing Fracture Stage II
  • 4. Healing Fracture Stage III
  • 5. Healed Fracture Stage IV
  • 6.  
  • 7. Amputated 3rd distal phalanx
    • Third digit was caught in a snow blower.
  • 8.  
  • 9. Amputated tuft of 1st digit
    • The thumb was caught in an auger.
  • 10.  
  • 11. Soft tissue injury, with no bony involvement.
  • 12.  
  • 13. Dislocated 5th CM jt.
  • 14.  
  • 15. Dislocated 2nd DIP jt.
    • This is a classic injury caused by catching a baseball.
    • Note the avulsion fracture.
  • 16.  
  • 17. Dislocated Elbow
  • 18.  
  • 19. Dislocated Lunate
  • 20.  
  • 21. Dislocated 3rd PIP jt.
  • 22.  
  • 23. Dislocated 5th PIP jt.
  • 24.  
  • 25.
    • Monteggia fracture
  • 26.  
  • 27. Avulsion fracture
  • 28.  
  • 29. Boxers fracture
  • 30.  
  • 31. Colles fracture
  • 32.  
  • 33. Comminuted fracture of the tuft of the 3rd digit
  • 34.  
  • 35. Complete (Transverse) fracture
  • 36.  
  • 37. Spiral fractures
  • 38.  
  • 39. Obliquely oriented hairline fractures
  • 40.  
  • 41. Impacted fracture
  • 42.  
  • 43. Severe impaction
  • 44.  
  • 45. Navicular fracture
    • The “waist” of the navicular is fractured.
    • Note the difference in densities of the fracture fragments. This is caused by Aseptic necrosis.
  • 46.  
  • 47. Nightstick fracture
  • 48.  
  • 49. Open fracture
  • 50.  
  • 51. Radial head fracture
  • 52.  
  • 53. Radial head fracture
    • This shows the importance of proper positioning.
    • The partial flexion with the humerus parallel does not demonstrate the fracture.
  • 54.  
  • 55. Radial head fracture demonstrating the “fat pad sign”
  • 56.  
  • 57. Supracondylar fracture
  • 58.  
  • 59. Multiple forearm fractures
    • Severely displaced fractures of the distal humerus radius, and ulna.
  • 60.  
  • 61. Severe soft tissue laceration
  • 62.  
  • 63. Pisiform fracture Gaynor Hart
  • 64.  
  • 65. Greenstick fracture
  • 66.  
  • 67. “Bow” fracture Note the cortical and impacted fractures.
  • 68.  
  • 69. Torus fracture
  • 70.  
  • 71. Salter-Harris Type 1 fracture
    • The type 1 fracture is indicated by a dislocation of the epiphysis.
  • 72.  
  • 73. Salter-Harris Type 2 fracture
    • The type 2 fracture is indicated by a fracture of the metaphysis.
    • Note the spiral fracture of the 2nd metacarpal.
  • 74.  
  • 75. Child Abuse
    • This was a healing fracture that was re-broken.
    • Note the periosteal callus formation (arrows).
  • 76.  
  • 77. Polydactyly
  • 78.  
  • 79. Multiple fractures & dislocations
  • 80.  
  • 81. Pre-op & Post-op joint replacement
  • 82.  
  • 83. Gunshot wound
  • 84.  
  • 85. 2nd & 3rd digits nailed together
  • 86.  
  • 87. Fracture of the distal radius
    • Fracture indicative of child abuse
  • 88.  
  • 89. Humeral Fracture
    • Fracture indicative of child abuse
  • 90.  
  • 91. Gunshot wound
  • 92.  
  • 93. Ewings Sarcoma

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