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UNEP in the mountains- Data needs and gaps- Examples in Himalayas and Central Asia                                     Law...
What is GRID-ArendalEstablished in 1989 by theGovernment of Norway as aNorwegian FoundationMission is to communicateenviro...
Polar programme mandateProvide UNEP with environmental assessments and early warning, with particular focus onthe Arctic.-...
Mountains and RioAgenda 21, Section IIConservation & Management ofResources for DevelopmentChapter 13Managing Fragile Ecos...
Mountains and RioB) Data and information13.7. Governments at the appropriate level, with the support of the relevantintern...
Mountain ecosystem goods and services
New publication duein print - July 2012
Global Environmental Changes                                        The effects of climate changeAll figures extracted fro...
Global Environmental ChangesThe effects of climate change
Status of glacier monitoring                                                                  • Gaps                      ...
Global Environmental Changes                                                                              The effects of c...
Central Asia                                                                                             climate          ...
Recommendations:Re-activation of monitoring interrupted in the 90’s   1. In depth study of “strategic” glaciers and rivers...
HICAP Background:"Every Great Project Has a Prequel"•   In the beginning, HICIA, The "Himalayan    Climate Impact and Adap...
Hindu Kush Himalaya region
HICAP Goal
ObjectivesHICAP is a five-year programme (2011–2015) focused on four sub-basins of major Himalayan river systems: two sub-...
Why Women in Adaptation?Women are more vulnerable than men toclimate change as they face more social,economic, and politic...
Outputs 2011
GEO-5 conclusions: Data GapsResearch and data gapsA number of research and data gaps identifiedby GEO-5 need to be address...
Mountain data needsWater, snow and ice:because the hydrological cycle will be enhanced under warmer climaticconditions, th...
Mountain data needsHealth:changing climates may lead to new distributions of vector-borne disease. Aparticularly interesti...
UNEP in the mountains
UNEP in the mountains
UNEP in the mountains
UNEP in the mountains
UNEP in the mountains
UNEP in the mountains
UNEP in the mountains
UNEP in the mountains
UNEP in the mountains
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UNEP in the mountains

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Presentation made by Lawrence Hislop, Head of Polar and Cryosphere programme. GRID-Arendal - Norway

- What is GRID-Arendal
- Polar programme mandate
- Mountains and Rio
- Mountain ecosystem goods and services
- Global Environmental Changes. The effects of climate change
- Central Asia climate
- Recommendations
- Hindu Kush Himalaya region
-

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  • Mountains are important sources of water, energy, minerals, forest and agricultural products and areas of recreation. 40% of global population lives in the watersheds of rivers originating in the planet’s different mountain ranges. Mountains have a profound influence on not only their local climate and immediate vicinity, but sometimes in areas a thousand or more miles away.
  • Mountains are important sources of water, energy, minerals, forest and agricultural products and areas of recreation. 40% of global population lives in the watersheds of rivers originating in the planet’s different mountain ranges.
  • Mountains are important sources of water, energy, minerals, forest and agricultural products and areas of recreation. 40% of global population lives in the watersheds of rivers originating in the planet’s different mountain ranges.
  • Mountains are important sources of water, energy, minerals, forest and agricultural products and areas of recreation. 40% of global population lives in the watersheds of rivers originating in the planet’s different mountain ranges.
  • Transcript of "UNEP in the mountains "

    1. 1. UNEP in the mountains- Data needs and gaps- Examples in Himalayas and Central Asia Lawrence Hislop Head, Polar and Cryosphere programme GRID-Arendal Norway Rio Mountain Pavillion, 2012
    2. 2. What is GRID-ArendalEstablished in 1989 by theGovernment of Norway as aNorwegian FoundationMission is to communicateenvironmental information topolicy-makers and facilitateenvironmental decisionmaking for change.GRID-Arendal is acollaborating centre ofthe United NationsEnvironment Programme(UNEP).Operate as a non-profit www.grida.noorganisation.
    3. 3. Polar programme mandateProvide UNEP with environmental assessments and early warning, with particular focus onthe Arctic.- GEO contributions.•Stakeholder processes - To facilitate and participate in stakeholder processes thatrecognize different values, perspectives, and knowledge, with a particular emphasis onempowering Arctic peoples.•Assessments and Early Warning - To provide interdisciplinary polar assessments andearly warning to build awareness as a foundation for decision-making.•Capacity Building – To engage in projects and initiatives toward building the capacity ofArctic peoples to effectively manage regional challenges and to take advantage of emergingopportunities.•Communication and Outreach - To raise the profile of the Polar Regions by providingoutreach, education and communication services.•Expertise - To provide analytical and management tools, methods and expertise to meetstakeholder demands.
    4. 4. Mountains and RioAgenda 21, Section IIConservation & Management ofResources for DevelopmentChapter 13Managing Fragile Ecosystems:Sustainable Mountain Development
    5. 5. Mountains and RioB) Data and information13.7. Governments at the appropriate level, with the support of the relevantinternational and regional organizations, should:(a) Maintain and establish meteorological, hydrological and physical monitoringanalysis and capabilities that would encompass the climatic diversity as well aswater distribution of various mountain regions of the world;(b) Build an inventory of different forms of soils, forests, water use, and crop,plant and animal genetic resources, giving priority to those under threat ofextinction. Genetic resources should be protected in situ by maintaining andestablishing protected areas and improving traditional farming and animalhusbandry activities and establishing programmes for evaluating the potentialvalue of the resources;(c) Identify hazardous areas that are most vulnerable to erosion, floods,landslides, earthquakes, snow avalanches and other natural hazards;(d) Identify mountain areas threatened by air pollution from neighbouringindustrial and urban areas.
    6. 6. Mountain ecosystem goods and services
    7. 7. New publication duein print - July 2012
    8. 8. Global Environmental Changes The effects of climate changeAll figures extracted from ZOÏ, Climate change in Central Asia: a visual synthesis, 2009
    9. 9. Global Environmental ChangesThe effects of climate change
    10. 10. Status of glacier monitoring • Gaps • Lack of data since 1990 system limitations • Slow re-activation since 1996 Left figures come from CAWa personnal communicationRight figure extracted from IHP/HRWP, Assessment of Snow, Glacier and Water Resources in Asia, 2009
    11. 11. Global Environmental Changes The effects of climate changeAll figures extracted from ZOÏ, Climate change in Central Asia: a visual synthesis, 2009
    12. 12. Central Asia climate Country trends - Temperature increase - Precipitation decreaseAll figures extracted from ZOÏ, Climate change in Central Asia: a visual synthesis, 2009
    13. 13. Recommendations:Re-activation of monitoring interrupted in the 90’s 1. In depth study of “strategic” glaciers and rivers (including climatic parameters), 2. Basic study on a larger panel of glaciers and rivers, 3. Remote sensing monitoring of the remaining glaciers.Specific research on permafrost and “rock glaciers”- Monitoring- Potential impact on geo-hazards and water resourcesGeo-hazard assessment- Short to medium term thread- Early warning and civil engineering solutions
    14. 14. HICAP Background:"Every Great Project Has a Prequel"• In the beginning, HICIA, The "Himalayan Climate Impact and Adaptation Assessment"• 2-year Feasibility Study (2008-10)• CICERO, ICIMOD & GRID-Arendal• CICERO and GRID´ s first project related to the HKH• Main objective: Identify the human, economic, social and environmental vulnerability factors and key impacts related to climate change in the HKH Result – identified data gaps and needs.
    15. 15. Hindu Kush Himalaya region
    16. 16. HICAP Goal
    17. 17. ObjectivesHICAP is a five-year programme (2011–2015) focused on four sub-basins of major Himalayan river systems: two sub-basins in theBrahmaputra and one each in the Indus and the Ganges.The major objectives are:•to reduce uncertainty through downscaling and customizing ofglobal climate change scenarios and develop water availability anddemand scenarios for parts of major river basins;•to develop knowledge and enhance capacities to assess,monitor, and communicate the impacts of and responses to climatechange (compounded with other drivers of change) on natural andsocioeconomic environments at local, national, and regional levels;•to make concrete and actionable proposals for strategiesand policies, considering vulnerabilities, opportunities, andpotentials for adaptation, with particular reference to strengtheningthe role of women and local communities.
    18. 18. Why Women in Adaptation?Women are more vulnerable than men toclimate change as they face more social,economic, and political barriers limitingtheir coping capacity.However, women’s responsibilities inhouseholds and communities, and asstewards of natural and householdresources, position them well tocontribute to strategies for adaptation tochanging climate and environment.
    19. 19. Outputs 2011
    20. 20. GEO-5 conclusions: Data GapsResearch and data gapsA number of research and data gaps identifiedby GEO-5 need to be addressed in order totrack more accurately the state and trends ofthe global environment. Data need to bestrengthened on issues such as freshwaterpollution, groundwater depletion,land degradation and chemicals andwaste.In addition, it is often difficult to compare thesituation in different countrieseven when data are available, since manycountries follow their own national guidelineswhen collecting them, rather than standardinternational guidelines.
    21. 21. Mountain data needsWater, snow and ice:because the hydrological cycle will be enhanced under warmer climaticconditions, the current distribution, seasonality, and amount of precipitationmay undergo significant changes in various geographical regions. Theconsequences for river runoff are likely to affect not only the watersheds withinthe mountains themselves, but also in the lowland regions that are heavilydependent on this mountain resource.Vegetation, forests, and biodiversity:biodiversity in mountain areas encom- passes both natural and cultivatedspecies; these systems are all sensitive to climatic factors and are likely to havedifferent vulnerability thresholds ac- cording to the species, the amplitude, andthe rate of climatic change.
    22. 22. Mountain data needsHealth:changing climates may lead to new distributions of vector-borne disease. Aparticularly interesting example in the context of mountains and uplands is thepossible propagation of malaria as an indicator of climatic change.Tourism / economic development:over the last 25 years, tourism and recreation has been one of the fastestgrowing industries worldwide. Tourism has both economic benefits for, andpotential adverse effects on, mountain environments and local mountaincommunities.
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