Storyboard office 2010
 

Storyboard office 2010

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Office 2010 is an evolutionary change from 2007. The biggest change revolve around making it easier to display and filter through data. A recent survey conducted by Info-Tech Research Group found ...

Office 2010 is an evolutionary change from 2007. The biggest change revolve around making it easier to display and filter through data. A recent survey conducted by Info-Tech Research Group found that:

•The next 18 months will bring the market over-the-hump on migrating to Office Open XML.
•Office Web Apps could be game-changing and may mitigate the need to virtualize Office apps.
•Soon, most companies will be running Office 2007 or Office 2010.
Office 2003 is an aging suite quickly losing support from Microsoft and third-party software developers. Info-Tech recommends that businesses running Office 2003 should begin planning the move to Office 2010.

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  • Good info. The transformational shift to the ribbon is huge, but it enables so much. If you need Office 2010 Tips and Tricks to support your deployment and user readiness, email info@officmindshare.com
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  • CCR: Cluster Continuous Replication SCR: Standby Continuous Replication
  • CCR: Cluster Continuous Replication SCR: Standby Continuous Replication
  • CCR: Cluster Continuous Replication SCR: Standby Continuous Replication
  • Link notes in Appendix to Actual Notes

Storyboard office 2010 Storyboard office 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Make the Decision to Upgrade to Microsoft Office 2010 Info-Tech Research Group
  • Introduction
    • 44% of organizations are still running Microsoft Office 2003. With the impending release of Office 2010, this solution set provides extensive analysis and guidance regarding upgrading to the newest Microsoft Office suite.
    Info-Tech Research Group What’s New in Office 2010 Enhanced Features Office Web Apps Versions Available Upgrade Paths Scenario-based Upgrade Advice File Formats Current Landscape Versions in Use Upgrade Plans
  • Executive Summary
    • Office 2010 is an evolutionary change from 2007. T he biggest changes make it easier to display and filter through data.
    • The next 18 months will bring the market over the hump on migrating to the Office Open XML (OOXML) file format. If you are not using OOXML now, the time will come soon when switching is necessary.
    • Office Web Apps could be game-changing, allowing companies to perform hybrid deployments, and may mitigate the need to virtualize Office applications except Visio and Project.
    • Info-Tech recommends businesses make their upgrade decision based on two factors: what version of Office they’re running, and whether or not they own the licenses for Office 2010.
    Info-Tech Research Group
  • Info-Tech Research Group What’s New in Office 2010 Enhanced Features Office Web Apps Upgrade Paths File Formats Current Landscape Versions in Use Upgrade Plans Versions Available Scenario-based Upgrade Advice
    • Office 2003 still has the largest number of users; these organizations must make an upgrade/migrate decision soon
    • 58% of users face potential file format issues since older versions of Office do not render all OOXML files properly
    • An upgrade decision is more relevant for older office suites
    Only 42% of organizations are currently running the latest Office release Info-Tech Research Group 2003 2007 Other Source: Info-Tech Research Group Version of Microsoft Office currently in use N=164 “ There's nothing great in the product, and we will have to train new staff on the system to get them up to speed with it, but I can not hold on to Office 2003 much longer! ” – IT Manager, Hospitality
    • A recent survey shows most enterprises don’t see the need to pay for Office 2010
    • Most organizations are moving to Office 2007 instead of Office 2010 because they already own it
    • Licensing is only a concern for 4% of businesses surveyed
    • For over 50% of organizations, software is a component of project cost
    More than half of organizations will be spending money on licenses for Office upgrade and should consider alternatives Info-Tech Research Group Source: Info-Tech Research Group Most businesses plan to use existing licenses N=164
    • 26% still plan to upgrade to Office 2007, mostly because they already own the licenses
    • Organizations not upgrading or migrating to another platform risk running into major file compatibility issues with partners and customers creating OOXML files
    • A significant number of companies are not yet going to 2010
    Over the next 18 months, 59% of organizations are upgrading to Office 2007 or 2010 Info-Tech Research Group No Plans 2010 2007 Other Platform Source: Info-Tech Research Group Migration plans for companies surveyed N=164
    • This upgrade cycle will create a market where the majority of Office users are running fully OOXML compliant software
    • Very significant market share will be on Office 2007 or 2010
    85% of organizations will be on Office 2007 or Office 2010 by 2011 Info-Tech Research Group 2010 2007 Other Platform Source: Info-Tech Research Group Projected market share for 2011 N=164 “ Most of our customers and suppliers are sending us .docx and .xlsx files, so we need to upgrade in order to keep pace with them and maintain compatibility.” – Help Desk Technician, Manufacturing
  • What’s New in Office 2010 Enhanced Features Office Web Apps Upgrade Paths File Formats Current Landscape Versions in Use Upgrade Plans Versions Available Scenario-based Upgrade Advice
    • OneNote is now included in all versions of Office
    • Enhanced data presentation features (Sparklines, Slicer, etc.)
    • Easier image and video editing directly in Word and PowerPoint
    • Conversation view now default in Outlook, thread maintenance tools, Social Connector
    • SharePoint Workspace replaces Groove
    • Fluent UI and Ribbon now standard across all applications
    • Customizable ribbon enables quick access to commonly used features
    • What’s New?
    Office 2010 is a refinement, not an overhaul Info-Tech Research Group Source: Microsoft Slicer Sparklines
    • Provides editing & viewing access to files through the most common browsers (currently IE, Safari, Firefox) on any platform
    • Available for Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and OneNote
    • Same “look & feel” in browser
    • OOXML files can be edited in desktop client and saved directly to the cloud Files can be easily shared and co-authored with others
    • Runs on SharePoint Server 2010 or Microsoft’s Live.com
    • What is it?
    A recent Info-Tech survey shows 14% of organizations plan to utilize Office Web Apps Info-Tech Research Group
      • Office Web Apps and SkyDrive is available to any user with a Windows Live ID
    Web Apps Offer Multi-Browser Support Source: InfoTech For a more in-depth look at what’s new in Office 2010, see Info-Tech’s research notes “ What’s New in Office 2010 Core Apps? ” and “ What’s New in Office 2010 Peripheral Apps ?”
  • Most new and enhanced features can deliver greater productivity and additional insight, but some are limiting
    • Sparklines provide graphical context to information without the need for a large, full-size graph
    • Slicer extends previous accessibility gains, making filtering PivotTable data simpler
    • Additional image and video editing capabilities will eliminate the need for third-party solutions for some users (i.e. marketing and design professionals)
    • Office Web Apps’ co-authoring capabilities can make document creation faster and more efficient for small teams
      • Office Web Apps on Windows Live allows for simultaneous, real-time edits
      • Changes made using Office Web Apps on SharePoint can only be seen after saving the file
    • Outlook’s Conversation View, the core function of which has been available since Office 97, is still not smart enough to recognize that e-mails with the same subject are not always related to other e-mail threads
    • While there is now a 64-bit version of Office, Microsoft is recommending enterprises deploy the 32-bit version due to lack of third-party and Microsoft support for 64-bit plug-ins
    Info-Tech Research Group
    • Home users use e-mail and office productivity apps the most. Web Apps can enable home use without requiring a laptop be issued to the employee. An alternative to a virtual desktop, for office productivity apps.
    • Like the virtual desktop value ROI, Web Apps can reduce the cost to support the desktop, especially in light usage scenarios:
      • Call center agents
      • Receptionists
      • Data entry clerks
      • Manufacturing/production floor
    • You still have to pay for a standard license to use Web Apps and you need SharePoint. So where’s the benefit?
    Best reason to use Office Web Apps: home use and enable process-driven workers Info-Tech Research Group
    • Office Web Apps rank lower than major competitors in many key categories.
    • The major strength of Office Web Apps is its compatibility with Microsoft Office. This prevents complications of a mixed environment.
    • Strongest privacy and security is dependent on self-hosted SharePoint Server
    • Works well as a compliment to client, not as a standalone solution
    Office Web Apps strong in familiarity and compatibility, weak everywhere else Info-Tech Research Group Category Relative Rank Accessibility 3 2 1 Usability 3 2 1 Office Compatibility 1 3 2 Familiarity 1 3 2 Sharing/Co-authoring 3 1 2 Ease of Use 2 1 3 Cost 3 1 2 Speed 3 1 2 Privacy/Security 1 3 2 FINAL RANK 3 1 2
    • OOXML was adopted as an ISO and ECMA standard in April 2008
    • Capabilities of XML-based formats far exceed older file types, file sizes can be up to 75% smaller
    • Most office suites (OpenOffice.org, iWork, Google Docs) support the OOXML standard
    • Benefits of using the OOXML file format:
    OOXML saves disk space and is quickly becoming a widely adopted standard Info-Tech Research Group For more information on why businesses should adopt OOXML for content creation, see Info-Tech’s research note “ Office Open XML: Adoption Ready . ” File format adoption plans:
    • OOXML adoption is outstripping ODF adoption 3:1
    • Organizations must plan to adopt OOXML as the default file format to continue sharing documents with 85% of other companies
  • Upgrade Paths What’s New in Office 2010 Enhanced Features Office Web Apps File Formats Current Landscape Versions in Use Upgrade Plans Versions Available Scenario-based Upgrade Advice
    • Professional available through retail and OEMs, and suitable only for small businesses or enterprises with no licensing agreement.
    • Standard and Professional Plus are only available through volume licensing.
    • OneNote is now included in every version of Office 2010. This will require help desk and end user training.
    • Five versions have been simplified to just three
    Less is more: fewer options makes selection easier Volume License only
      • Microsoft is offering a reduced, simplified collection of Office 2010 versions.
    Different strokes for different folks Word Excel PowerPoint Outlook Access Publisher OneNote Pro support Office Web Apps via Windows Live Word Excel PowerPoint Outlook OneNote Outlook Publisher Office Web Apps on premises Word Excel PowerPoint Outlook Access Publisher InfoPath Communicator OneNote SharePoint Workspace Retail & OEM only Office 2010 Professional Office 2010 Standard Office 2010 Pro Plus
  • Office 2010 Version Upgrade Map Info-Tech Research Group Old versions map well to new versions, making selection easier If an end user requires the same features as Professional Plus, Enterprise, or Ultimate 2007, the highest end version available now is Pro Plus 2010.
  • Four upgrade scenarios: where are you?* Info-Tech Research Group For the best practices on deploying Office 2010, refer to Info-Tech’s research note “ Upgrading to Office 2010: Out With the Old .” * % of respondents in each scenario from a recent Info-Tech survey, with some overlap due to mixed deployments Own Office 2010 already Do not own Office 2010 already At Office 2003 or below
    • I: “Just Do It”
    • Challenge :
    • No support
    • Abandonment by third parties
    • Action :
    • Upgrade to Office 2010 now.
    • II: “Start Over Now”
    • Challenge :
    • No support
    • Abandonment by third parties
    • Acquisition cost
    • Action :
    • Evaluate Office 2010 and competitors to select new standard
    At Office 2007
    • IV: “Don’t Rush It”
    • Challenge :
    • Too soon to realize full ROI from Office 2007 upgrade project.
    • Action :
    • Re-assess each year.
    • Consider hybrid 2007 and 2010 Web Apps deployments
    • Adopt OOXML formats
    • III: “Start Over Eventually”
    • Challenge :
    • Too soon to realize full ROI from Office 2007 upgrade project.
    • Acquisition cost
    • Action :
    • Re-assess each year.
    • Eventually evaluate Office 2010 and competitors to select new standard
    • Adopt OOXML formats
    31% 13% 15% 42% I II IV III
  • Just do it: You’re at Office 2003 or below and you own Office 2010
    • Organizations using Office 2003 should still consider an upgrade from Office 2010 as soon as possible.
      • Upgrading to Office 2007 is not advised unless deployment is already underway.
      • OOXML format is not native in Office 2003. Office 2003 uses convertors. Staying on Office 2003 creates file compatibility issues with customers and partners that are moving ahead to OOXML with Office 2007 or 2010.
      • Third party integration with Office 2003 is declining (e.g. CRM, content management).
      • The cost of upgrade is limited to project implementation costs, since the organization already owns Office 2010.
      • Consider consolidating Office 2010 upgrade with Windows 7 upgrade, to reduce implementation costs even further.
    Info-Tech Research Group For more information on deploying Office 2010, refer to Info-Tech’s research note, “ Upgrading to Office 2010: Out With the Old .” I II IV III
  • Start over now: You’re at Office 2003 or below and you do not own Office 2010
    • Organizations using Office 2003 should still consider upgrading from their current version of Office.
      • OOXML format is not native in Office 2003. Office 2003 uses converters. Staying on Office 2003 creates file compatibility issues with customers and partners that are moving ahead to OOXML with Office 2007 or 2010.
      • Third party integration with Office 2003 is declining (e.g. CRM, content management).
      • Since there is no pre-existing software assets to leverage, start a green field office productivity suite selection project. Evaluate Office 2010 alongside competitors as if the organization is starting over.
    Info-Tech Research Group For more information on deploying Office 2010, refer to Info-Tech’s research note, “ Upgrading to Office 2010: Out With the Old .” I II IV III
  • Microsoft now competes with other platform independent office suites Info-Tech Research Group Positioning of popular productivity suites Source: Info-Tech Research Group
    • Microsoft Office is now partially platform independent through the web, but not natively.
    • Office Web Apps can be used as a replacement for application virtualization in many cases, but some functionality is lost.
    • OpenOffice.org-based suites (StarOffice and Symphony) offer free, platform independent desktop clients.
    • Web-only suites (Google & Zoho) have varying price points, including free, depending on functionality required and number of users.
    How do Office Web Apps change Office 2010’s positioning? I II IV III
  • Strong positioning give Microsoft & Google high scores Info-Tech Research Group “ We looked hard at OpenOffice.org, or upgrading to the latest version of Corel, but choosing something other than MS Office is like swimming upstream. We needed compatibility with other applications that integrate with Word and ease of sharing documents with other agencies. Availability of employees in labor market who are already skilled, and availability of training resources, was also a factor. MS Office is also more feature-rich than OpenOffice.org, which is important for some of our power-users.” – Consultant, Telecommunications Category Rating (1=poor, 4=excellent) Usability 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 Portability 2 1 3 3 4 4 3 Collaboration 2 1 1 1 2 3 3 Cost 1 2 4 4 4 4 2 Functionality 4 4 2 2 3 1 2 Familiarity 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 Reliability 3 3 2 2 2 4 2 Total 20 16 17 16 19 20 17 I II IV III
  • Start over eventually: You’re at Office 2007 and you do not own Office 2010
    • Organizations using Office 2007 that do not own Office 2010 should hold where they are through 2011. It is unlikely that full ROI has been achieved yet to balance the costs incurred from the Office 2007 upgrade.
      • Consider waiting until enough is known about Office 2013 to evaluate it alongside competitors instead of Office 2010. In late 2011 or early 2012, start a green field office productivity suite selection project. Evaluate Microsoft Office alongside competitors as if the organization is starting over.
    Info-Tech Research Group I II IV III
  • Don’t rush it: You’re at Office 2007 and you own Office 2010
    • Organizations using Office 2007 should not rush to upgrade to Office 2010. It is unlikely that full ROI has been achieved yet to balance the costs incurred from the Office 2007 upgrade.
    • However, organizations that own Office 2010 and are planning to upgrade to Windows 7 in 2010/11 should consider consolidating an Office 2010 upgrade with Windows 7 upgrade, to exploit the opportunity to make a single pass at the desktop.
    • Adopt the OOXML formats as default, since most organizations will be using OOXML within the next 12 months.
    • Consider deploying Office 2010 Web Apps anyway, if there are large segments of process-driven workers that rarely need Office:
      • Call center agents, receptionists, data entry clerks, production/manufacturing floor.
    Info-Tech Research Group For more information on deploying Office 2010, refer to Info-Tech’s research note, “ Upgrading to Office 2010: Out With the Old .” I II IV III
    • 59% of organizations are planning an upgrade over the next 18 months, bringing market share of Office 2010 to 33%.
    • Office 2010 is not a revolutionary change, it is mostly a refinement or enhancement of Office 2007.
    • Most of Office 2010’s new features are designed to enhance data presentation and collaboration.
    • Enterprises must begin looking at migrating to the OOXML file format
    • Microsoft Office 2010 is only available in three versions, providing a simpler choice of which version to deploy.
    • Bottom Line:
      • Office 2003 shops that do own Office 2010 should upgrade to Office 2010 as soon as possible.
      • Office 2003 shops that do not own Office 2010 should start a green field office suite selection project as soon as possible.
      • Office 2007 shops that do not own Office 2010 should wait for at least a year and then start a green field office suite selection project.
      • Office 2007 shops that do own Office 2010 should wait for the next Office release unless they can benefit from Office Web Apps.
    Summary Info-Tech Research Group
  • Appendix
    • Slide 11 : What’s New in Office 2010 Core Apps?
    • Slide 11 : What’s New in Office 2010 Peripheral Apps?
    • Slide 12 : Office Open XML: Adoption Ready
    • Slide 16 : Upgrading to Office 2010: Out With the Old