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  • 1. Providing world class civic amenities for urban India- A veritable necessity PUNARJANMA INDIA BY RAJ KIRAN.M ADARSH RAVI VIGNESHWAR.M ALAGAPPAN.AR FUAAD OMAR - A cine-quanon of growth
  • 2.  Nearly one in every six urban Indian residents lives in a slum.  It is expected that most probably the slum population will cross over 100 million by the year 2017.  An estimated 69% of Indians still lack access to improved sanitation facilities. There is a lack of waste management  Thiruvananthapuram and Kota are the only two cities in India that have continuous water supply. All the others experience perennial water supply problems.  Over 300 million people in India have no access to electricity. Of those who do, almost all find electricity supply intermittent, erratic and unreliable. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 People in slums - 17% Lack of water sources - 4% Lack of sanitation facilities - 46% Lack of electricity - 25% KEY ISSUES SOURCE:- WIKIPEDIA
  • 3.  Introduction of a new housing concept to Indian households  Feasible to increase density in an already incredibly dense city.  Reduces the cost of providing infrastructural support to previously undeveloped areas.  Mitigation of cost of maintenance resulting from lesser area.  Curbs electricity usage thus, saving energy. SLUMS TO MICRO FLATS - PLAN OF ACTION SLUM CLEARANCE REBUILDING IDENTIFICATION OF SLUMS (Remote sensing) COLLECTION OF DATA BASE (Zone based collection) REHABILITATION RELOCATION MICRO FLATS PREVENTION (Forecasting the rate of growth of the city -25 years) WHY MICRO FLATS ? From extremely congested to peripheral areas With the aid of GIS
  • 4. • Estimate based on area to be mapped & associated features to be geo-referenced and digitized. Preparation of Geo-referenced base map (capable of being integrated into GIS platform) of entire urban agglomeration after digitization of different features. • Based on aggregate slum population and number of thematic layers to be created for each slum , zone or city. Analysis of spatial and socio-economic data to create city level spatial and socio-economic reports to facilitate slum level dialogues for developing slum redevelopment rehabilitation plans • Based on an estimate of slum population /Number of Households in all slum pockets in the city & its fringes . Estimated cost for socio-economic survey • Based on number of trainers and slum level volunteers to be trained and proposed community awareness/mobilization activities/events . Cost of training of trainers, conducting training for slum volunteers, related community mobilization activities by NGOs during survey, etc • Not to exceed cumulative of 5% of above Costs.Administrative & Office expenditure including establishment of Technical Cell with staff at city level for facilitating and guiding all the above activities. Item of Preparatory Activity Parameter for estimation of cost Template for Financial Requirements/Assistance for Activities at city level under Slum Free City Planning
  • 5. DIRECTOR GIS DIVISION GIS MANAGER GIS CO-ORDINATOR GIS ANALYST LAN ADMINISTRATOR STRATEGIC PLANNING DIVISION ASSISTANT DIRECTOR PRINCIPAL PLANNER SENIOR PLANNER COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION ASSISTANT DIRECTOR PROGRAM SUPERVISOR FISCAL OFFICER ZONING & DEVELOPMENT REVIEW DIVISION ZONING ADMINISTRATOR OPERATION MANAGER DESIGN REVIEW SPECIALIST ADMINISTRATOR OFFICER SECRETARY Composition of Technical Committee for preparation of Slum Free City Plan(State wise)
  • 6. Colloquially referred to as the “2 per cent clause,” Clause 135 of the Companies Bill (2012) has the potential to transform the landscape of CSR in India The new law will make it incumbent for companies having a net worth of Rs.500 crore or more, or a turnover of Rs.1,000 crore or more or a net profit of Rs.5 crore or more, during any financial year, to spend at least two per cent of net profits towards CSR activities. 2% of the average net profit of top 10 Indian companies 25 Billion (Approx.) Role of central government • Share in viability gap funding • Share in infrastructure costs Role of state government • Capital subsidy • Interest subsidy Role of private developer • Equity contribution and/or subsidized housing loan P3 model
  • 7. Inerts - 34.65% Green Waste - 32.25% Food Waste - 8% Timber - 6.99% Paper - 6.45% Consumable plastics - 5.86% Rags & textile - 3.14% Rubber & Leather - 1.45% Industrial plastics - 1.18% Steel & Material - 0.03% SECTORAL COMPOSITION OF WASTE (CHENNAI) Residential waste must be segregated into BIO-DEGRADABLES and PLASTICS . The plastics can be processed at the PYPROPLANTS. TOTAL WASTE COMPOSITION (CHENNAI) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Residential - 68% Commercial - 16% Institution - 14% Industries - 2% SOURCE:- CHENNAICORPORATION.GOV.I N SOURCE:- CHENNAICORPORATION.GOV.IN E-waste -1,46,180 Tonnes p.a (India) 65 cities produce over 60% of the E-waste . Ten states generate 70% of the total e-waste generated in India. There is no large scale organized e-waste recycling facility in India and the entire recycling exists in unorganized sector.
  • 8. BEST PRACTICES SOURCE SEGREGATION SOURCE COLLECTION REDUCTION OF DUSTBINS ON ROADS TRANSFER STATION COMPACTOR VEHICLES DISPOSAL SITES SHREDDING MACHINES INCREASES LIFE TIME OF LANDFILLS E-WASTE RECYCLERS MONEY TO CLIENTS VIA POSTAL SERVICES GREEN BRIGADE CLUBS(VOLUNTEERS FROM COLLEGES) E-WASTE SOURCES SHREDS PLASTICS FOR TAR ROADS REDUCES THE VOLUME OF WASTES Pypro -plant SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT OF E-WASTES
  • 9. Pyro-plant a machine invented by Chitra Thiyagarajan is capable of converting plastics into diesel when heated under the absence of oxygen over chromium micro band heaters at a temperature of 350 to 375 degree celsius . The device is not expensive and requires just 3 hours to generate fuel. A 5kg unit costs around Rs. 75,000 and a 25kg variant, Rs3 lakh. Each kg of plastic produces 800ml of diesel. While the diesel can be stored, the LPG generated has to be used directly and cannot be compressed ."A similar process is used to generate fuel in China but the production costs are high and it is a time-consuming process. PYPROPLANT SOURCE:-TIMESOF INDIA Assuming one plant works 9 hrs for 300 days a year. Using 75 kgs of plastic 9 hrs -> 2400 ml 2400 ml * 300 days = 720000 ml of diesel a year
  • 10. Installation of Solar- Powered Trash Compactors and Recycling Kiosks Large sale operation of pypro-plants Reclamation of landfill sites Establishment of solar parks Installation of Desalination plants The Silver Lining Door to door collection of wastes facilitates optimum utilization of manpower , providing new employment opportunities to the urban poor. Large scale operation of pypro-plants are expected to reduce the import of crude oil With improved sanitation facilities the vulnerability of contagious diseases will experience a sharp decline Absorption of student volunteers in socio-economic activities will inculcate civic responsibilities in the youth of the nation Bringing the slum dwellers under a single roof facilitates the provision of social welfare to the informal economy(most of the slum dwellers engage themselves in the informal economy i.e domestic work,street vending etc) Down the road game plan(future plans)
  • 11. Risks and Challenges Lack of vigilance on part of the government agencies allows encroachment and squatting on their lands Squandering of CSR funds Deprivation of viability funding gap Slow paper work Lack of political will Meagerness of collective responsibility to address the problems of waste accumulation Mitigation factors Implementation of stringent anti-encroachment laws Tight monitoring by the Central Vigilance commission that would prevent the misuse of CSR funds Creation of perks that would attract funders Providing a hands-on experience to the students on lines of Solid waste /E-waste management Starting of awareness campaigns that would induce the need for attaining sustainable growth
  • 12. REFERENCES http://www.chennaicorporation.gov.in/ http://mhupa.gov.in/w_new/RAY%20Guidelines-%20English.pdf .http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/less-corporate-more-social/article5007515.ece http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-08-26/chennai/41454053_1_fuel-patent-device http://www.moneycontrol.com/stocks/top-companies-in-india/net-profit-bse.html

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