EkPahal

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EkPahal

  1. 1. Manthan Topic-14 PROTECTING THE VULNERABLE Team Ek Pahal-IIM Indore Abhijeet Singh Dr.Abhishek Kothari Ishansh Niranjan Mohit Shital Anshu Ranjan
  2. 2. The informal sector is that part of an economy that is not taxed, monitored by any form of government, or included in any gross national product (GNP), unlike the formal economy Categorization of the Informal sector labour force In terms of Occupation: • Small and marginal farmers, landless agricultural labourers, share croppers, fishermen, those engaged in animal husbandry, beedi rolling, labeling and packing, building and construction workers, leather workers, weavers, artisans, salt workers, workers in brick kilns and stone quarries, workers in saw mills, oil mills etc. come under this category In terms of Nature of Employment: • Attached agricultural labourers, bonded labourers, migrant workers, contract and casual labourers come under this In terms of Specially distressed categories: • Toddy tappers, Scavengers, Carriers of head loads, Drivers of animal driven vehicles, Loaders and unloaders come under this category In terms of Service categories: • Midwives, Domestic workers, Fishermen and women, Barbers, Vegetable and fruit vendors, News paper vendors etc. belong to this category Introduction Street vendors Pillars of supportIndustrial workersWaste PickersHouse MaidsTimeline Sectors 2004-05 Informal 2004-05 Formal 2004-05 Total 2009-10 Informal 2009-10 Formal 2009-10 Total Unorganised 393.5 1.4 394.9 385.08 2.26 387.34 Organised 29.1 33.4 62.6 42.14 30.74 72.88 Distribution of workforce in Organized and unorganized Sector Value in millions
  3. 3. Introduction Street vendors Pillars of supportIndustrial workersWaste PickersHouse MaidsTimeline Collection of data Formulation of policy Look for NGOs Coordination with Schools Coordination with govt Collaboration with Post offices/Banks Assigning them Numbers and gauging migration Involving whole society 6-8 Months 3-4 months 2 months 6 months 3 months 4 months 2 months Continuous effort
  4. 4. • All vegetable vendors are given particular number. • Dividing city into areas which are further subdivided into sub-areas • Each sub area will have particular number of vendors. • Vendors of an area will be headed by a person who will work under local municipality or Nagar Nigam • Deposits money with head who works as an agent of Post Office • Recognition and identity is established • Economic security due to deposit in post office. Hence can avail loan • Policies and centralised schemes applicable as number of vendors and their identity are known. Hence social security established • Migration can be gauged which can help government to make policies accordingly Consequences Choices/ decision Street vendors Vendors-Number and Area Better Opportunities Created Govt polices to be formed accordingly Gauging Migration Social Security Economic Security Loan Availability Area Head deposits mone in Post office Govt and Policies Introduction Street vendors Pillars of supportIndustrial workersWaste PickersHouse MaidsTimeline
  5. 5. • All house maids are given particular number • Dividing city into areas • Each area will have particular number of maids • Each area will be headed by a person who will work under local municipality or Nagar Nigam • Deposits money with head who also works as an agent of Post Office/ Bank • Set the time limit for working hours. • School timing run by Govt. or NGO’s fixed according to time limit of maids • NGO will work as an intermediary for achieving the task Consequences Choices/ decision House Helpers • Economic security due to deposit in post office. Hence can avail loan • Policies and centralised schemes applicable as number of maids and their identity are known. Hence social security established • Migration can be gauged which can help government to make policies accordingly • Children can get education and also can reap benefit of centralised education scheme House maid-Number and area Better Opportunities Created Govt polices to be formed accordingly Gauging Migration Social Security Economic Security Loan Availability Area Head deposits money in Post office Govt and Policies NGO as Intermediary Fix working hours School hours changed accordingly Education-children Introduction Street vendors Pillars of supportIndustrial workersWaste PickersHouse MaidsTimeline
  6. 6. • All waste pickers who picks garbage from home to come under Nagar Nigam or local Municipalities • Getting money from people according to the rates decided by Nagar Nigam • Fixing the rates so that they are not exploited • Depositing their income in bank accounts by local administration • Recognition and identity is established • Economic security due to deposit in post office/banks. Hence can avail loan • Policies and centralised schemes applicable as number of waste pickers and their identity are known. Hence social security established • Migration can be gauged which can help government to make policies accordingly Consequences Stage 1 Choices/ decision Waste Pickers All waste pickers covered under Nagar Nigam or Municipalities Better Opportunities Created Govt polices to be formed accordingly Gauging Migration Social Security Economic Security Loan Availability Income deposited in Post office/Banks Govt and Policies Fixing rates Introduction Street vendors Pillars of supportIndustrial workersWaste PickersHouse MaidsTimeline
  7. 7. • Use waste pickers which are working under Nagar Nigam or Municipality to work as an agent and gather data about other waste pickers • Subsequently register them • Working with NGO to help them register and try to give them basic education • After gauging their activity for a year, help them get access to banking facility • Recognition and identity is established • Policies and centralised schemes applicable as number of waste pickers and their identity are known. Hence social security established • Migration can be gauged which can help government to make policies accordingly • Better practices for waste picking can be taught • Bank or Post Office account will help govt. pass on funds without any leakage Consequences Stage 2 Choices/ decision Waste Pickers Better Opportunities Created Govt polices to be formed accordingly Gauging Migration Social Security Basic Education Gauging their activity for a year NGO Register Opening of account Use of existing waste pickers as agents Govt transfer funds according to policies Improved economically Introduction Street vendors Pillars of supportIndustrial workersWaste PickersHouse MaidsTimeline
  8. 8. Industrial Workers • Compulsory registration of workers on website or to agency associated with it • Basic education provided to them • Making a committee at district level where for every block will be headed by one person(can be the person who is already working in industry) who help people register and get data about that industry at micro level • Policies can be formulated accordingly • Real time data will be available and social and economic condition could be improved subsequently by making laws Introduction Street vendors Pillars of supportIndustrial workersWaste PickersHouse MaidsTimeline
  9. 9. Financial inclusion services Business Development Services Institutional development Saving: direct through agents at area level in PO Productivity enhancement though reduction in cost and increase in efficiency Skill and entrepreneurship development Individual awareness Credit: loans from banking sector Risk Mitigation through insurance Group formation in area Mutual benefit Govt. subsidies availability Govt. subsidies availability Usage of IT for accounting and information management system Pillars of support NGO Local Govt./ Institutions Local People Economic security Social security Sustainability Introduction Street vendors Pillars of supportIndustrial workersWaste PickersHouse MaidsTimeline
  10. 10. References • Measuring the Informal Economy in Developing Countries by Indrajit Bairagya • Report of the Committee on Unorganised Sector Statistics by National Statistical Commission Government of India • The Informal Economy: Fact Finding Study by Department for Infrastructure and Economic Cooperation. Retrieved 20 November 2011

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