BIGEYIE

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BIGEYIE

  1. 1. Protecting the Vulnerable Providing Social Welfare to Informal Sector Workers
  2. 2. Social security, as a system to meet the basic needs as well as contingencies of life in order to maintain an adequate standard of living, is not charity but the right of all workers, because they are the contributors towards the national income of the country. Social security is defined as labour right because it is originated from work and is claimed out of the income towards which the labour has contributed. In India the term social security is generally used in its broadest sense, it may consist of all types of measures preventive, promotional and protective as the case may be. EXEMPLIFING SOCIAL WELFARE…
  3. 3. INDIA--An Overview Population: 1.23 Billion GDP: US $4.2 GDP Growth in past three years: 8.5% per annum Area: 3,287,590 sq.km Exports: US $100 Billion Foreign Exchange Reserves: US $160 Billion Total workforce: 390 Million In organized sector:28 Million 7% 93% India- Compositions of Workforce (In Millions) ORGANIZED UNORGANIZED 64% 36% Unorganized Sector in India (In Millions) Total Agricultural Worker Non-Agricultural Worker 45% 55% Agricultural Workers (In Millions) Landless Worker Other Agricultural Workers
  4. 4. All Economic Unit Employees Employer Agricultural Incorporated Unit Unincorporated Unit More than 10 people engaged Less than 10 people engaged Real Basis for Taxation Paying Lump Sum or not paying at all Non-Agricultural Unpaid Family Workers FROM THE GRAPH, WE CAN CONCLUDE THAT FROM THE YEAR OF (1972-2005 ) NDP OF UNORGANISED SECTOR REMAINS ABOVE THAN THAT OF THE ORGANISED SECTOR. The Organised Sector And Unorganised Sector Both Contribute Towards The Country’s NDP. Taking Graph As The Referrence,Contribution Of Organised Sector Is Lesser Than The Unorganised But The Case Is Not The Same When It Comes For Availing The Facilities.
  5. 5. FUTURE POSSIBILITIES………….. FORCING FOREIGN INVESTMENT TO USE MORE AND MORE COUNTRY’S AGRICULTURAL RAW MATERIAL AND LABOUR RESOURCE. PROVIDING BIGGER MARKET EXPOSURE TO SMALL SCALE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURAL SECTOR KEEPING IN VIEW THAT THERE IS NO EXPLOITATION OF WORKERS AND THEY ARE FAIRLY PAID FOR THEIR WORK PROVIDING CAPITAL AND RAW MATERIALS TO SMALL SCALE AND AGRICULTURAL SECTOR PREVAILING SCENARIO ×IRREGULARITY IN AVAILABILITY OF WORK ×LESSER PAID WAGES ×LACK OF BIGGER MARKET EXPOSURE ×LACK OF CAPITAL THRESHOLD (the barrier) LACK OF COMMUNICATION BETWEEN GOVERNMENT AND INFORMAL SECTOR CORRUPTION LACK OF INTEREST OF THE MASS
  6. 6. POPULATION ILLITERACY POVERTY UNCONSCIOUSNESS (about the beneficial programmes) HEALTH CARE ECONOMICALLY CRRIPLED CORRUPTION UNORGANISED SECTOR REMAINS THE SUFFERS………….. Poverty and High Cost of formal land delivery system Informal settlements Insecure tenure Fear of eviction Lack of basic amenities High cost on informal supply of amenities Low household investments Poor standard of liing
  7. 7. Low productivity Natural resource degradation core of the problem Vulnerability Low crop & livestock productivity (food insecurity) Traditional farming/livestock practices Limited access to technologies services, credits, markets etc. High risk to invest High demand on women’s time High fertility rate need local institutions repressing local interest One sided technology promotion Lack of diversification and alternate Livelihood outside farming Loss of soil/land productivity Decreasing size of cultivable land Inadequate water harvesting and catchments/watershed management management Deforestation,fuelwood crisis Shortage of livestock feed Limited participation of local people Non-compilance with regulation Limited opportunity to broaden the livelihood base using NR High climate varaition Limited access to food Drought/famine Disruption of social and econmic activity Food aid Mass migration Government campaign for resettlement outside famine area SUFFERINGS OF TODAY…
  8. 8. Health Security Maternity Needs Life and Accident Security Unemployment Security Old Age Security Four major strategies have been identified by which social security can be extended to informal sector workers and their dependants. These strategies involve–  Specially designed insurance schemes  Social assistance in health, nutrition and educational services  Extension and reform of formal sector social insurance  Innovative social security schemes  Public initiatives SOCIAL SECURITY National Old Age Pension Scheme (NOAPS) National Maternity Benefit Scheme (NMBS) Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY)
  9. 9. EMPLOYMENT OPPRTUNITIES Jawahar Rojgar Yojana (JRY) Sampoorna Gram Swarozgar Yojana (SGSY) Jawahar Gram Samriddhi Yojana (JGSY) Employment Assurance Scheme (EAS) Pradhan Mantri Gram Sadak Yoajna (PMGSY) FOOD SECURITY Public Distribution System (PDS) Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS) Mid-Day Meal Scheme (MDMS) Food for Work Programme (FFW) Informal sector in India requires huge infrastructural and institutional arrangements involving financial implications beyond the capacity of the Government in the changing scenario all over the world.
  10. 10. Krishi Shramik Samajik Suraksha Yojana(launched in 2001): provides for pension and insurance besides providing money back. The contribution of the beneficiary is Re.1/- per day while the Government contributes Rs. 2/- per day. Janshree Bima Yojana is a group insurance scheme which covers natural/accidental death, partial or total permanent disability due to accident and the people belonging to BPL category are eligible to join the scheme. Viradha Pension Scheme:Pension scheme for the workers engaged in the unorganized sector. Since India is one of the largest numbers of informal workers in old age also, so this scheme was introduced by the government to support the old(aged) unorganised sector workers. National rural employment guarantee act 2005(NREGA):under this scheme ,government guarantees at least 100 days of employment in a year.if they fail in doing so,then they has to give unemployment allowances to the workers registered under this scheme.
  11. 11. In fact , what is lacking is a broad and specific theoretical framework that locates all these experiences of exploitative work in a capitalist mode of production. The problem is that the policies themselves need to be critiqued much more harshly than is being done at present. For instance , a major part of the government’s efforts at creating employment are directed at creating scheme-based work at low wedge rates. Much of these schemes based work employed women , poor women mainly, and have largely tackled the social determinants of well-being of the workers themselves. These are issues that may need to be explored in the coming years given in the increased and exaggerated emphasis by the Indian state on social policy interventions The Government has to play a role of facilitator and promoter so that the workers employed in the informal sector are able to get requisite level of protection and security to have decent work environment enabling them to express their skills fully and according to their capabilities necessary for enhancing the competitiveness of their outputs and thereby raising their income and socio-economic status. OUR URGE…
  12. 12. >The Telegraph >India Today >The Frontline >The Hindu >NCERT-Democratic Politics (Class IX & X) >NCERT-Economics (Class IX &X) >Kavita Das, Prof. K.B.Das, Dr. S.Mohanti; Social Security in Infomal Sector—A Myth >Yu-Wei-Hu, Fiona Stewart; Pension Coverage and Informal Sector Workers; OCED Publishing >Sheila Bhalla;The restructuring of unorganised sector in India
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