Accelerators
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Accelerators

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Accelerators Accelerators Presentation Transcript

  • STEPPING STONE: ENHACING QUALITY OF PRIMARY EDUCATION IN INDIA 1 BY: ANUBHAV PORWAL BIBHUJJAL RAJ KASHYAP ESHAN SHARMA KANWAR ABHAY THAKUR SHASHANK AGRAWAL DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT
  • CONTENTS  Introduction to primary education  Education in rural sector  Concept of clusters  How cluster school works??  Cluster school structure  Government role  Conclusion 2
  •  Improvements in primary education (4 years of a basic education, between the ages of 6 and 10) address poverty and food insecurity in the long term by targeting the root problems of a lack of literacy and numeracy in communities.  Improved literacy and numeracy will allow impoverished individuals to.  Become informed about nutrition and health, so they will be better able to care for themselves and dependents  Become capable of understanding and using new technologies that improve agricultural yields  Obtain higher-paying jobs, so they have an increased ability to buy food  Empowerment of women through education can play a crucial role in conquering childhood malnutrition. Introduction 3 View slide
  • Education in rural & developing area  On relative cost-effectiveness of education in developing regions, it is advises that anything beyond general secondary education and 'a minimum exposure to pedagogical theory' is not cost-effective.  It is also suggests a focus on basic and sufficient resources; that is, don't plan for high quality buildings and furniture, TVs, and computers if the students don’t even have chalkboards.  Parents are more likely to send their children to school if they see primary education as a stepping stone to greater achievement and success. When primary education quality improves, resulting in an increased earning capacity and thus greater freedom to look beyond simply growing enough food to eat, secondary education will become a more viable option. 4 View slide
  • Introduction to Cluster Schools  Our goals for education will be realized through the implementation of regionally- designed variations of the cluster-school system.  The physical building of schools will be a smaller component of this plan, since the problem in most impoverished areas is not lack of schools, but low attendance rates. Rather, we will focus on improving school quality and relevancy of material taught, and on increasing attendance through our other plans  Cluster school systems have been implemented with great success in some Southeast Asian and Latin American countries. Thailand turned to a cluster system for rural schools in the 1960s with extraordinary results. 5
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  • How cluster school will work??  Grouping schools into clusters is an effective way to improve primary education quality in rural areas while remaining cost-effective.  6 to 11 schools are associated with a central school in a single cluster. We recommend a maximum of 7 schools per cluster, however, based on indications that a greater number of schools per cluster decreased the effectiveness of the system .  The access between each school to the central school must be good, and if adequate transportation methods do not exist, improving them must be a priority.  Adequacy of transportation is judged on the basis of transit time, cost, and safety.  This arrangement permits the sharing of school resources (textbooks, for example). In rural areas of Thailand, for example, village schools would rotate a set of books in a tin box; thus, instead of a single school benefiting, all of them did (Bray, 1987). Each school would receive resources for a certain amount of time based on the size of the school. 7
  • Important points of cluster schools  Cluster schools also allow for regular teacher meetings/trainings at the central school location. Since teacher quality and teacher attendance are two of the most important factors in school quality, regular meetings and trainings would hold teachers more accountable, increase teacher quality and provide support for teachers.  Teaching in an impoverished rural area is a significant challenge, and teachers lacking in training will not be able to face it.  Teacher attendance is such a problem in some areas that teachers are required to take a time-stamped photo of themselves with their students each day in the school year, and the amount of pay they receive depends on the number of valid photos recorded. 8
  • Finances  Governments are advised in the Nation Protocol to develop effective education in rural areas through variations of the cluster school model. However, since the Protocol also advises countries to lower or abolish school fees in the interest of increasing attendance, governments may need assistance to cover the costs.  To achieve universal primary completion (UPC), 103 million additional children must be enrolled in school.  A lack of adequate resource or funding allocation indicates that the available funds and resources for cluster school programs are stretched thin. It was these instances when past implementations of cluster schools failed, so special care should be taken to prevent overextension of resources; a general principle of quality over quantity should be observed. 9
  • Conclusion  We will focus on improving primary school connections and access to information using the cluster school plan in rural areas where existing primary schools are unsatisfactory.  Quality of primary schools will be evaluated by indicators of student attendance, teacher attendance, and test scores.  Student and teacher attendance rates lower than 70% are target areas.  Our focus is on rural areas since these regions are where hunger rates tend to be higher and education quality tends to be lower. 10
  • 11 jai hind jai bharat