Our thoughts about Ada

231 views
142 views

Published on

Published in: Lifestyle, Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
231
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Our thoughts about Ada

  1. 1. OUR THOUGHTS ABOUT ADA'S NEEDS
  2. 2. Although  Ada  has  stated  that  she  doesn't  feel  she   needs  to  use  any  'technology'  in  her  home,  it  is   apparent  that  she  actually  makes  use  of  a  number  of   such  items  already.     Therefore,  it  would  seem  that  the   main  issue  in  this  case  scenario  is  Ada's   associa<ons  of  Assisitve  technology   with:   •     Being  labelled  as  old  or  infirm   •     Reduced  independence   Ada's issues with Assistive Technology
  3. 3. For  Ada  to  accept  assis<ve  technology  into  her  home   environment,  the  following  strategies  may  be  considered:   Integra(on  -­‐  Find  appropriate  technology  that   is  not  necessarily  associated  with  disability  or   infirmity;   Camouflage  -­‐  Is  it  possible  to  disguise  the   technology,  so  that  the  appearance  does  not   s<gma<se  the  user?   Emphasis  -­‐  Rather  than  focusing  on  reducing   the  risk  of  falls,  technology  should  be  offered   as  a  means  of  maximising  Ada's  independence.   ICE: strategies to encourage acceptance of AT
  4. 4. USING MAINSTREAM TECHNOLOGYAS A FOUNDATION FOR ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION
  5. 5. We  know  that  Ada  has  already  accepted  a  large  amount  of  modern   technology  into  her  home.       Therefore,  if  we  can  find  technology  that  could  be  used  to  manage  her   risk  of  further  falls,  whilst  being  useful  to  her  in  other  ways,  she  is  much   more  likely  to  accept  its  use.     From  Ada's  perspec<ve,  her  isola<on  from  others  is  likely  to  be  more   important  than  dealing  with  falls  or  other  emergencies.     Maybe  we  can  reduce  her  health  risks  by  introducing  a  home  computer   system,  with  access  to  the  internet?   Integration
  6. 6. In  2009,  64%  of  adults  aged  65  or  more  reported  that  they  had  never   used  the  internet  (Office  for  Na<onal  Sta<s<cs  2009:10).     The  most  common  reasons  given  for  not  using  the  internet  include:   •     Perceived  lack  of  need   •     Perceived  lack  of  understanding  of  the  technology   (Ofcom,  2009)     However  in  2013,  this  had  reduced  to  just  30%  for  65-­‐74  year  olds.  Non   usage  of  the  internet  was  s<ll  high  for  those  aged  75+  ( Office  for  Na<onal  Sta<s<cs  2009:10).   Problems with introducing a computer
  7. 7. Ada  may  find  the  following  helpful  in  beginning  to  use  the   internet:   •   So_ware  to  simplify  access  and  browsing:   •   Eldy   •   BigScreenLive   •   Internet  Bubons   •   SimplyUnite  Gem     •   Alex   •   Enable  browsing  without  the  need  for  a  mouse  or  keyboard:   •   PAL  Browser   •   Touch  screen  computers  &  Mul<-­‐touch  devices  (e.g.   Microso_  Surface;  Fuss  Free  Phones)   •   Voice  recogni<on  so_ware  (e.g.  Apple  computers)   AT for internet use
  8. 8. Some  poten(al  benefits  of  introducing  the  internet  to   Ada  could  be:   •   Access  to  medical  services  online   •   Hands  the  ini<a<ve  back  to  Ada   •   Opportunity  to  incorporate  remote   monitoring  services   •   May  be  more  acceptable  to  Ada  than  a   pendant  alarm   •   Increased  ease  of  contact  with  family   members   •   Reduces  their  level  of  worry   Benefits of Internet use for Ada
  9. 9. Accessing medical services online Click  here  for  a  case  study  for  My  Health  Online  
  10. 10. My  Health  Online  is  a  service  which  will  soon  be  available  to    all   pa<ents  in  Wales,  to:   •   Access  their  health  records  online.   •   Book  GP  appointments  via  the  internet.   •   Order  prescrip<ons  from  home  or  work.   •   Maintain  a  health  diary  that  can  be  shared  with  their  GP.   •   Give  poten<al  for  more  in-­‐depth  telemedicine.   NHS  Direct  is  a  digital  health  and  advice  service  which  allows   users  to:   •   Check  their  own  symptoms  and  be  signposted  to  best  treatment.   •   Request  call  backs  from  a  healthy  professional.   •   Choose  and  Book  Appointments  Line  (for  pa<ents  newly   referred  to  hospital  consultant  out-­‐pa<ents  clinics).   Accessing medical services online
  11. 11. If  Ada  is  unwilling  to  accept  a   community  alarm  sytem,  she   may  s<ll  be  ready  to  engage   with  a  service  which   establishes  contact  with  her  on   a  daily  basis.     Perhaps  the  simplest  of  these  is   Alertacall    and   OK  Each  Day  (opposite)  -­‐  but   similar  services  could  also  be   established  informally  with   mainstream  internet  systems.   'Low-key' monitoring services
  12. 12. An  unobtrusive  method  of  assessing  if   Ada’s  home  is  warm  enough  could  be  to   use  a  monitoring  system  such  as  the   Envirotxt  plug  in,  which  monitors  high  &   low  temperatures  and  powercuts,  and   sends  a  text  to  family/friends  if  there   are  any  issues.     Another    AT  that  could  be  used  is  the   AroundMe  service,  which  is  being   piloted  in  conjunc<on  with  HDTI,   Coventry  University.  It  incorporates     both  temperature  alerts  and  ac<vity   sensors,  which  send  text  updates  to  a   specific  members  of  a  ‘neighbourhood’.   Keeping warm
  13. 13. Hiding Assistive Technology from public view CAMOUFLAGE
  14. 14. One  of  the  main  problems  with  the  solu<ons  discussed   previously  is  that  they  cannot  detect  a  fall,  etc,  as  it  happens.     •   Therefore,  these  may  not  sa<sfy  the  requirements  of  Ada's  family.   •   However,  Ada  is  unlikely  to  accept  something  that  has  a  'clinical'  appearance.     Possible  future  op<ons:   •   Disguising  a  standard  pendant  alarm  as  an  item  of  jewellery:   •   This  was  suggested  by  par<cipants  in  a  recent  study  by  Coventry   University.   •   Speedy  –  a  fall  detector  integrated  into  a  watch  is  in  development.   •   Necklace  –  not  a  fall  detector  but  poten<ally  the  same  technology.   •   Using  an  alterna<ve  method  of  detec<ng  falls,  such  as:   •   Smart  Carpet   •   iShoes     Detecting falls
  15. 15. On Increasing Independence EMPHASIS
  16. 16. Even  though  Ada  finds  the  idea  of  a  fall  detector  as  making   her  feel  ‘old’  or  ‘infirm’,  for  many  they  can  actually  help  to   increase  the  feeling  of  independence  (see  a  video  of  users   here).     Encouraging  Ada  to  see  other  people  like  herself  using   Assis<ve  Technology  to  their  benefit  may  also  help,   specifically,  other  users  with  similar  demographics  who   champion  the  use  of  ATs  (see  an  example  here).     A  recent  project  (COMODAL)  at  HDTI,  Coventry  University  has   looked  into  how  to  improve  the  consumer  market  for   electronic  Assis<ve  Technologies  for  older  people,  specifically   in  increasing  the  desirability  of  investment  in  development.   AT to Increase Independence

×