Invasive Plant Species<br />Japanese Knotweed<br />Created by Renee Garrett<br />June 21, 2011<br />
Scientific Name:  Polygonum  cuspidatum (synonym)                              Fallopia  japonicaTaxonomic Rank: Magnoliop...
Japanese Knotweed<br /><ul><li>Dense growing perennial shrub-like plant reaching heights of 10 ft.</li></ul>"Knot 1." Onli...
Identify Stems<br /><ul><li>Semi-woody stem is hollow and enlarged nodes.</li></ul>"Hollow-speckled Stalk." Online image. ...
Identify Leaves<br /><ul><li>Leaves are alternate and broadly ovate, leaf base is truncate.</li></ul>"Leaves." Online imag...
Identify Flowers<br /><ul><li>Flowering occurs in late summer, when small, greenish-white flowers develop in long panicles...
Male and female flowers occur on separate plants. </li></ul>Landry, Louis. "Japanese Knotweed Flower." Online image. 2005....
Location<br /><ul><li>It is found near water sources, such as along streams and rivers, in low-lying areas, waste places, ...
Identify Seeds<br /><ul><li>Reproduction occurs both vegetative (rhizomes) and seeds, making this plant extremely hard to ...
A  native of Japan, China, and parts of Korea and Taiwan. Introduced to the U.S. in the late 1800‘s from England.Ornamenta...
Selected for Ornamental Beautyand Preventing Soil Erosion<br />Slattery, Britt. "Foliage and Flowers." Online image. Invas...
Counties of Virginia<br />Natural Resource Conservation Service. United States Department of Agriculture, n.d. Web. 17 Jun...
Eight states list Japanese Knotweed as a Noxious Weed<br />Alabama                               Washington<br />Californi...
International Threat<br />Known introduced range:                     Australia, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark,...
Ranked Highly Invasive 2009 in Virginia<br />"Japanese Knotweed." Online image. Japanese Knotweed Alliance. Web. 17 June 2...
Impact: Very Aggressive Species<br />The species forms dense stands that crowd out all other vegetation.<br />Degrading na...
Management PlansChemical:<br />Experience in other states where it is a serious pest suggests that the best control method...
 <br />The psyllid <br />The sap-sucking psyllid Aphalara itadori<br />"The psyllid ." Online image. Japanese Knotweed All...
Management Plans Other potential agent: the leaf-spot fungus Mycosphaerella polygoni-cuspidati<br />"The Leaf-spot Fungus ...
Natural Plant Alternatives in Virginia<br />Common Alder<br />Black Chokeberry<br />Alleghany Chinkapin<br />New Jersey Te...
Recipes For Japanese Knotweed<br />Shoots from mid-April to early May, can be eaten before the plant gets tough and woody....
Works Cited<br />Brill, Steve. "Shoots and Greens of Early Spring in North America." Wildman Steve Brill. Foraging with Wi...
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Invasive plant species

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  • Take a deep breath.
  • Common and scientific names
  • Introduce species descriptionShrub-like
  • Stems
  • Leaves
  • Flowers
  • Found near:
  • Seeds/rhizomes
  • When, where from, how was this invasive alien species introduced?
  • Transition from why it was introduced to becoming a threat.
  • How widespread in Virginia?
  • How serious a threat?
  • International scope/threat
  • How serious is threat?
  • What is the impact of this invasive species?
  • What proposed controls are being used ? ( see management plans for this)
  • Recipes?
  • Invasive plant species

    1. 1. Invasive Plant Species<br />Japanese Knotweed<br />Created by Renee Garrett<br />June 21, 2011<br />
    2. 2. Scientific Name: Polygonum cuspidatum (synonym) Fallopia japonicaTaxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida>Polygonales>Polygonaceae(Buckwheat Family)<br />Common names:<br /> Japanese knotweed<br /> Fleeceflower<br />Mexican bamboo<br />Huzhang<br />Crimson Beauty<br />Reynoutria<br />Brill, Steve. "Shoots and Greens of Early Spring in North America.<br />" Wildman Steve Brill. Foraging with Wildman, n.d. Web. 17 June 2011. <br />
    3. 3. Japanese Knotweed<br /><ul><li>Dense growing perennial shrub-like plant reaching heights of 10 ft.</li></ul>"Knot 1." Online image. Devoid of Culture and Indifferent to the Arts. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://docaitta.blogspot.com/2011/02/foraging-3-easting-dastardly-japanese.html>. <br />
    4. 4. Identify Stems<br /><ul><li>Semi-woody stem is hollow and enlarged nodes.</li></ul>"Hollow-speckled Stalk." Online image. Food Under Foot. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://foodunderfoot.com/juicing-japanese-knotweed/comment-page-1>. <br />
    5. 5. Identify Leaves<br /><ul><li>Leaves are alternate and broadly ovate, leaf base is truncate.</li></ul>"Leaves." Online image. Virginia Tech Weed Identification Guide. Web. 16 June 2011. <http://www.ppws.vt.edu/scott/weed_id/polcu.htm>. <br />
    6. 6. Identify Flowers<br /><ul><li>Flowering occurs in late summer, when small, greenish-white flowers develop in long panicles in the axils of the leaves.
    7. 7. Male and female flowers occur on separate plants. </li></ul>Landry, Louis. "Japanese Knotweed Flower." Online image. 2005. CalPhotos. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=photos_index&where-taxon=Polygonum+cuspidatum>.<br />
    8. 8. Location<br /><ul><li>It is found near water sources, such as along streams and rivers, in low-lying areas, waste places, utility rights-of-way, and around old home sites. </li></ul>"Infestation." Online image. Center for Invasive and Ecosystem Health. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.invasive.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=5271079>. <br />
    9. 9. Identify Seeds<br /><ul><li>Reproduction occurs both vegetative (rhizomes) and seeds, making this plant extremely hard to eradicate. </li></ul>"Growth Bud 2 - Rhizome." Online image. Cornwall Council. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.cornwall.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=13810>. <br />"Seeds of Knotweed." Online image. Colby-Sawyer College. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.colby-sawyer.edu/herbarium/invasive/invasive10.html>. <br />
    10. 10. A native of Japan, China, and parts of Korea and Taiwan. Introduced to the U.S. in the late 1800‘s from England.Ornamental plant forerosion control& for landscape screening.It is now found throughout the United States.<br />Rainey, Jack. "Foliage." Online image. Invasive Plants of Eastern United States. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.invasive.org/eastern/species/3414.html>. <br />
    11. 11. Selected for Ornamental Beautyand Preventing Soil Erosion<br />Slattery, Britt. "Foliage and Flowers." Online image. Invasive Plants of Eastern United States. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.invasive.org/eastern/species/3414.html>. <br />
    12. 12. Counties of Virginia<br />Natural Resource Conservation Service. United States Department of Agriculture, n.d. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=POCU6>. <br />
    13. 13. Eight states list Japanese Knotweed as a Noxious Weed<br />Alabama Washington<br />California Connecticut<br />Massachusetts<br />New Hampshire<br />Oregon<br />Vermont<br />Plants Database. United States Department of Agriculture, n.d. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=POCU6>. <br />
    14. 14. International Threat<br />Known introduced range: Australia, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Guernsey, Ireland, Isle of Man, Italy, New Zealand, Russian Federation, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Slovakia, United States (USA), and United Kingdom (UK)<br />Fallopia japonica is now officially regarded as the most pernicious weed in the United Kingdom.<br />Global Invasive Species Database. Invasive Species Specialist Group, n.d. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.issg.org/database/species/ecology.asp?si=91&fr=1&sts=>. <br />
    15. 15. Ranked Highly Invasive 2009 in Virginia<br />"Japanese Knotweed." Online image. Japanese Knotweed Alliance. Web. 17 June 2011. <br />
    16. 16. Impact: Very Aggressive Species<br />The species forms dense stands that crowd out all other vegetation.<br />Degrading native plant and animal habitat. <br />This perennial plant is difficult to control because it has extremely vigorous rhizomes that form a deep, dense mat. <br />In addition, the plant can re-sprout from fragments; along streams, plant parts may fall into the water to create new infestations downstream. <br /> "Japanese Knotweed." Invasive Plant Atlas of United States. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/subject.html?sub=3414>. <br />
    17. 17. Management PlansChemical:<br />Experience in other states where it is a serious pest suggests that the best control method is prevention of establishment.<br />The plant should be eradicated as early as possible upon its appearance. <br />Cutting the stalks as often as three times during the growing season will offset growth of the rhizomes.<br />An application of a glyphosate herbicide, after cutting, has been found to be most effective.<br /> "Invasive Alien Plant List." Natural Heritage. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, n.d. Web. 16 June 2011. <http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural_heritage/documents/invlist.pdf>.<br />
    18. 18.  <br />The psyllid <br />The sap-sucking psyllid Aphalara itadori<br />"The psyllid ." Online image. Japanese Knotweed Alliance. Web. 16 June 2011. <br />Management PlansNatural Defense<br />
    19. 19. Management Plans Other potential agent: the leaf-spot fungus Mycosphaerella polygoni-cuspidati<br />"The Leaf-spot Fungus ." Online image. Japanese Knotweed Alliance. Web. 16 June 2011. <br />
    20. 20. Natural Plant Alternatives in Virginia<br />Common Alder<br />Black Chokeberry<br />Alleghany Chinkapin<br />New Jersey Tea<br />Button Bush<br />Silky Dogwood<br />Wintergreen<br />Black Huckleberry<br />Witch Hazel<br />Winterberry<br />Mountain Laurel<br />Evergreen Mountain Fetterbush<br />Natural Heritage: N ative Plants for Mountain Region. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, n.d. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural_heritage/nativeplants.shtml>. <br />
    21. 21. Recipes For Japanese Knotweed<br />Shoots from mid-April to early May, can be eaten before the plant gets tough and woody.<br />Apple and Knotweed Pie<br />Knot Ice Cream<br />Knot Soup<br />Knotweed Sherbet<br />Steamed Knotweed Sesame<br />Strawberry-Knotweed Cobbler<br />An excellent source of vitamin A, along with vitamin C and its cofactor, the antioxidant flavonoid rutin. It provides potassium, phosphorus, zinc, and manganese. Also Japanese knotweed is an excellent source of resveratrol, the same substance in the skin of grapes and in red wine that lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol and reduces the risk of heart attacks.<br />Brill, Steve. "Shoots and Greens of Early Spring in North America." Wildman Steve Brill. Foraging with Wildman, n.d. Web. 17 June 2011.<br />
    22. 22. Works Cited<br />Brill, Steve. "Shoots and Greens of Early Spring in North America." Wildman Steve Brill. Foraging with Wildman, n.d. Web. 17 June 2011. <br />Growth Bud 2 - Rhizome." Online image. Cornwall Council. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.cornwall.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=13810>.<br />"Hollow-speckled Stalk." Online image. Food Under Foot. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://foodunderfoot.com/juicing-japanese-knotweed/comment-page-1>.<br />"Infestation." Online image. Center for Invasive and Ecosystem Health. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.invasive.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=5271079>.<br />Invasive Alien Plant List." Natural Heritage. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, n.d. Web. 16 June 2011. <http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural_heritage/documents/invlist.pdf>.<br />"Japanese Knotweed." Invasive Plant Atlas of United States. n.p., n.d. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/subject.html?sub=3414>.<br />"Japanese Knotweed." Online image. Japanese Knotweed Alliance. Web. 17 June 2011.<br />"Knot 1." Online image. Devoid of Culture and Indifferent to the Arts. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://docaitta.blogspot.com/2011/02/foraging-3-easting-dastardly-japanese.html>. <br />
    23. 23. Continued Works Cited<br />Landry, Louis. "Japanese Knotweed Flower." Online image. 2005. CalPhotos. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=photos_index&where-taxon=Polygonum+cuspidatum>.<br />"Leaves." Online image. Virginia Tech Weed Identification Guide. Web. 16 June 2011. <http://www.ppws.vt.edu/scott/weed_id/polcu.htm>.<br />"Native Plants in Mountains Brochure." Natural Heritage. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, n.d. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural_heritage/nativeplants.shtml>.<br />Natural Resource Conservation Service. United States Department of Agriculture, n.d. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=POCU6>. <br />Newcomb, Lawrence. Newcomb's Wildflower Guide. Boston, New York, London: Little, Brown and Company, 1977. Print.<br />"The psyllid." Online image. Japanese Knotweed Alliance. Web. 16 June 2011.<br />Rainey, Jack. "Foliage." Online image. Invasive Plants of Eastern United States. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.invasive.org/eastern/species/3414.html>.<br />Science Dictionary. The American Heritage Dictionary, n.d. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Invasive>.<br />"Seeds of Knotweed." Online image. Colby-Sawyer College. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.colby-sawyer.edu/herbarium/invasive/invasive10.html>.<br />Slattery, Britt. "Foliage and Flowers." Online image. Invasive Plants of Eastern United States. Web. 17 June 2011. <http://www.invasive.org/eastern/species/3414.html>. <br />
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