NEDAS DC Educational Summit - the Era of Convergence - Presentation Deck

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Topics include:
Putting the Converged Network Together
Moderated by: Peter Murray, CCI Systems
Panelists: Ray Hild, Corning; Doug Wiest, EVP of Wireless, EdgeConneX; Joshua Broder, CEO, Tilson


ROI Analysis – Does a DAS or Small Cell Network Deployment Pay?
Moderated by: Douglas J. Barnett, Business Development, Universal Electrical Service, Inc.
Panelists: Rene Pachinbhayag, In-Building Solutions Manager, AT&T; Benoit Fleury, VP of Product and Innovation, iBwave; Bob Butchko, National Marketing & Business Development, RF Connect, LLC; Chris Graff, Regional Sales Manager, SOLiD

DAS/WiFi/Small Cell Solutions for Hi-Rise Residential Applications
Moderated by: David Bronston, Special Counsel, Phillips Lytle
Panelists: Douglas Fishman, PMP, Director DAS Design and Implementation, SQUAN; John Celentano, Systems & Product Marketing, TESSCO; Ronald Plecas, Northeast DAS Guru, CommScope; Robert Lopez, DAS Consultant, RCC Consultants

Budget Approved! What Happens (Should Happen) Once the Customer Says Yes
Moderated by: Kevin Kurz, DAS – Wireless Business Manager, Anixter
Panelists: Walter Cannon, Vice President, Metro Network Services; Mike Brownson, VP DAS Technical Solutions, Hutton; Rick Baldasarre, Vision Technologies

Peering Into the Future: How Does the Prevalence of VoLTE, WiFi, eMBMS, Carrier Aggregation and New Spectrum Opportunities Shape the Future?
Moderated by: Andy Germano, Vice President, Americas for the Small Cell Forum
Panelists: Jeff Thompson, CEO, Towerstream; Prasad Ravi, CEO, INOC; Ahmed Abogendia, CEO, ATEC Wireless; Jim Zik, Sr. Product Manager, PCTEL

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NEDAS DC Educational Summit - the Era of Convergence - Presentation Deck

  1. 1. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University
  2. 2. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University Ilissa  Miller,  President  of  the  Northeast   DAS  +  Small  Cell  Associa:on  
  3. 3. Industry  Sta,s,cs   98%   of   wireless   operators   consider  small  cell  an  important   component  -­‐  Informa   16+  million   DAS  nodes  to  be   deployed   through  2016  –   Mobile  Experts   Ac,ve  and  Passive  DAS  to  rise   from   $1.24   billion   in   2012   to   $1.85   billion   in  2015  –  ABI  Research       80+%  mobile  data   usage  occurs   indoors   By  2018,  60%   deployments  will  be   outdoors   By  2017,  there  will   be  5  million   annual   shipments  of   small  cells     –  ARC  Chart  
  4. 4. More  Industry  Sta,s,cs   Wireless  Infrastructure   investments  will  generate  $1.2   Trillion  in  economic  ac,vity  and   create  1.2  million  jobs  -­‐  PCIA   2012  –  7  million  WiFi  Access  Points  Globally   2018  –  Grow  to  15  million  -­‐  Berg  Insights   92  million   units  to  be   deployed  by  2016   –  Informa   Telecoms  &  Media   $22  Billion,  total   market  value  by   2016  –  Informa   Telecoms  &  Media   By  2015,  50%  of  densifica,on   programs  will  use  small   cell  solu:ons.  
  5. 5. NOTABLE  NOTES   Project  Velocity  IP  ‘VIP’  =     40,000  small  cell  deployments   1,000  DAS  deployments   By  the  end  of  2014   First  to  install  a   na:onwide   commercial  residen,al   femtocell  service   Juniper  Networks  research  reveals  U.S.  number   4  in  LTE  penetra,on  (aer  S.  Korea,  Japan  and   Australia)  
  6. 6. DAS  vs.  Small  Cell   DAS                                                       Small  Cell   Can  cover  mul,ple  operators,   frequency  bands  and  technologies   (GSM,  CDMA,  HSPA,  LTE  &  WiFi)   Developed  as  an  eye  for  leasing   (homes,  enterprises,  metro  cells,  rural   and  mul,-­‐technology)   Deployed  by  operators,  neutral  host   or  landlords   Typically  serves  just  one  operator  &   one  technology   Effec,ve  for  complex,  large   deployments   Good  for  piecemeal  deployments  in   smaller  spaces   Coverage  solu,on  and  supports   increased  capacity  needs   Support  for  hot  spots  to  gain  beder   coverage  &  capacity   Deployed  outdoors  &  indoors   Deployed  outdoors  &  indoors   VS.   Some  similari,es,  different  technologies,  different  needs.    Both  are  stronger   together  as  a  combined/integrated  solu:on.    
  7. 7. Key  Challenges   VS   Challenges  for  both  DAS  and  small  cell  deployments  are  similar:   Power  /  Real  Estate  /  Backhaul   -­‐  Finding  an  outdoor  site  for  small  cell  deployments  can  be  expensive   -­‐  Lack  of  access  to  power   -­‐  Backhaul  solu,ons  are  expensive  and  inefficient   -­‐  Management  of  a  ‘converged’  network  of  macro  cells  and  small  cells  is   cumbersome   -­‐  Today’s  integrated  networks  are  complex  to  install   -­‐  Outdoor  deployments  complex  (can’t  just  hang  a  system  on  a  u,lity  pole)   -­‐  Biggest  building  boom  for  telecom  in  years  –  lack  of  access  to   knowledgeable,  experienced  employees  and  experts   Everything  in  wireless  takes  longer!  
  8. 8. Considera,ons:  Discerning  the  Right  Solu,on     VS   -­‐  Macro  cell  network  alterna:ve  solu:ons/considera:ons   -­‐  Adding  spectrum  or  carriers   -­‐  Upgrading  to  a  higher  modula,on  scheme   -­‐  Employ  sectoriza,on   -­‐  Small  Cells   -­‐  Experience  -­‐  Less  solu,ons  deployed  means  less  experience  in  the   market   -­‐  Volume  –  How  many  devices  are  being  deployed  in  the  field  and  how   will  it  effect  the  network   -­‐  Control  of  the  network  –  retaining  control  of  the  network  is  a  key   considera,on  to  ensuring  customer  care   -­‐  DAS   -­‐  What  is  it  good  for?    An  unclear  customer  base  such  as  those  in   entertainment  venues,  hospitals,  arenas,  higher  educa,on   campuses,  etc.  
  9. 9. It’s  not  a  DAS  vs.  Small  Cell  World   VS   Not  always  either/or  it  could  be  both/and….   ‘THE  ERA  OF  CONVERGENCE’   -­‐  Small  cells  are  just  one  part  of  the  larger  array  of  op,ons   -­‐  Macro  cell  sharing  solu,ons  could  spawn  interest  in  small  cell  sharing   models   -­‐  Wireless  Technology  is  as  essen,al  as  plumbing,  hea,ng  and  ligh,ng   -­‐  DAS  is  considered  the  4th  u,lity   -­‐  Converged  architecture  brings  licenses  and  unlicensed  networks  together   enabling  great  coverage  and  capacity   -­‐  “I  could  be  used  to  complement.    I  don’t  see  small  cells  replacing  DAS”   according  to  Aditya  Kaul,  Analyst  at  ABI  Research     Macro  cell,  small  cell  and  DAS  all  work  together  to  provide   beaer  capacity  and  coverage.      
  10. 10. The  Future  is  Bright   VS   -­‐  Small  cell  deployments  will  grow  faster  (because  not  as  many  have  been   deployed  so  far)   -­‐  Small  cell  with  distributed  macro  cell  solu,ons  are  changing  the  way  new   LTE  RAN  will  be  designed   -­‐  Small  cells  are  just  one  part  of  the  larger  array  of  op,ons     New  Technologies  and  new  business  models  are  constantly  changing!     -­‐  Mul,-­‐Standard  Metrocells  (MSMs)  –  AT&T’s  solu,on  deploys  small  cells   in  a  single  unit  that  combines  LTE,  HSPA  and  WiFi   -­‐  Innova,ve  Technologies  like  Small  Cell  RAN  (Ubiquisys/Cisco)   -­‐  Alcatel-­‐Lucent’s  Lightradio  Live   -­‐  Self-­‐Organizing  Network  (SON)  technology   -­‐  Femtocell  as  a  solu,on  (FaaS).    ABI  Research  predicts  that  10%  of   regional  carriers  in  the  US  will  us  FaaS  providers  for:   -­‐  Wholesale  delivery  of  femtocell  services     AND  MUCH  MORE!  
  11. 11. Event  Announcements   New  and  ‘To-­‐Do’   •  Travel  Coordina,on  Board  (located  by  registra,on)   •  On-­‐site  renewal  of  annual  sponsorships  (see  Ilissa   Miller)   •  Annual  sponsorship  sign  up  (see  Amy  Sesol)   •  The  SWAG  Corner  –  stop  by  for  goodies   •  Great  program,  excellent  people,  informa,on  galore   and  networking  opportuni,es  +  +   •  Just  one  more  thing…  
  12. 12. The  Era  of  Convergence   Today  wouldn’t  be  possible  without  YOU.    Thank  you.    
  13. 13. MARK  YOUR  CALENDARS!   SAVE  THE  DATES!   JANUARY  15,  2014   Social  in  Philadelphia   APRIL  2,  2014   Educa,onal  Conference    &  Training  in  New  York   JULY  16,  2014   Social  in  Boston   OCTOBER  9,  2014   Fall  Training  and  Social  
  14. 14. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University
  15. 15. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University Moderator:  Peter  Murray    
  16. 16. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University    Pusng  the  Converged  Network  Together                                        
  17. 17. Pusng  the  Converged  Network  Together   Peter  Murray   CCI  Systems   MODERATOR   Doug  Wiest   EdgeConneX   PANELISTS   Ray  Hild   Corning   Joshua  Broder   Tilson   10:15am  -­‐      Pufng  the  Converged  Network  Together  
  18. 18. Topics   •  Small  Cell-­‐Licensed   •  DAS   •  Wi  Fi   •  Integra,ng  with  the  Macro  
  19. 19. Exploding  Demand  Con,nues  to  Drive  Networks  Indoors     Generates  huge   bandwidth   demand   Implica:on   Many  more  devices  that   are  more  powerful   •  2G  phone  –  100  kbps   •  iPhone  –  1s  Mbps   •  Laptop  –  10s  Mbps     Data  hungry  applica,ons   •  Video  and  Internet     Data  Explosion   Implica:on   1.570.20 Bits/ sec/Hz LTE3G 1.570.20 Bits/ sec/Hz LTE3G Drives  FTTA  &   smaller  size  cells   New  technology  required   to  meet  the  demand   •  4G  needs  strong  signal   for  maximum  data  rate   •  4G  uses  MIMO  to   increase  data  rate   4G/MIMO   Implica:on   Drives  networks   into  buildings   >80%  of  data  usage  is   indoors   •  Requires  networks  to  be   close  to  users   •  Trend  is  towards  shared   mul,-­‐operator  /  mul,-­‐ service  networks   Indoor  Networks   Implica:on   Drives  flexible   broadband   solu,ons   More  valuable  spectrum   required  for  networks   •  Mul,ple  bands  &   technologies  per   operator   •  Band  structure  varies  by   operator/region   New  Spectrum   Bands Operators 19  
  20. 20.   The  Bandwidth  Tsunami  con,nues  to  escalate  with  a  high   demand  for  new  alterna,ves.   • Operators  plan  to  use  a  mix  of   technologies  for  in-­‐building  coverage  and   capacity   • Ac,ve  DAS  is  s,ll  the  leading  solu,on   Operator  Strategies   Percentage  of  respondents   planning  to  use  each   technology,  N=21     Source:     InfoneHcs  Dec  2011   Operator Survey: Technologies for In-Building      $B   77% 14% 23% Fiber Copper DAS Equip CAGR ‘12-‘16 23% Cable   Ac,ves   Ac,ve  DAS  Market   Source:  Mobile  Experts  2012   Data  Traffic  By  Technology   20  
  21. 21. Small  Cell  Sizes   Residen:al   Femto   Enterprise   Femto   Pico   Micro   Macro   2  lbs  8  x  10  x  2   Inch   4  lbs     10  x  10  x  4  Inch     10  lbs     16  x  10  x  4  Inch     25  to  35  lbs     19  x  13  x  5  Inch     4-­‐8  Users   16-­‐32  Users   32-­‐128  Users   128-­‐256   256+   250  Feet     100mW     DC/POE/USB     250-­‐500  Feet     200mW     DC/POE     0.25  -­‐1  miles     250mW-­‐1W     POE+/AC/DC     1-­‐2  miles     2W-­‐6W     AC/DC     3+  miles     20+W     AC/DC    
  22. 22. Carrier  Challenges  to  Small  Cell  Deployment   •  Reduc,on  in  cost  structure   •  Incumbent  site  acquisi,on  vendors  need  paradigm  shi   •  Real  Estate  terms  could  delay  deployment   •  Opera,onal  consistency  and  tracking   •  Maintenance   •  Macro  to  small  cell  integra,on  and  hand-­‐offs  
  23. 23. Success  Factors  for  Small  Cell  Deployment   •  Site  Acquisi,on   –  Reset  expecta,ons  of  Real  Estate  owners/managers   –  Create  non-­‐monetary  trades   –  Focus  on  benefits  of  improved  wireless  services   –  Understand  ,me/regulatory  barriers  to  street  furniture/ poles   –  Provide  turnkey  solu,ons   –  Solve  coverage/capacity  issues  over  larger  geographies   –  Use  intermediary  underlying  agreements  
  24. 24. Challenges:  Pole  &  Conduit  Access   •  Regulatory  authority  and  compe,,on  for  access   •  Mul,ple  u,lity  owners   •  Make-­‐ready  construc,on/conges,on  
  25. 25. Success  Factors  for  Small  Cell  Deployment   •  Backhaul   •  Provide  aggrega,on  alterna,ves   •  Reduces  the  impact  of  price  compression   •  Provides  overall  reduc,on  in  cost   •  Provide  interconnect  alterna,ves   •  Minimize  new  construc,on   •  Seek  technical  alterna,ves   •  Tethered   Fiber,  Coax.  Copper   •  Untethered  (Microwave)   Licensed   Line  of  sight,  near  line  of  sight,  non-­‐line  of  sight   Unlicensed  
  26. 26. Adaching:  Exis,ng  Towers  vs.  Poles   VS.  
  27. 27. •  Supports Core Cellular Technologies •  Ability to Expand •  Future Ready •  Wi-Fi Offload Capability •  Additional Services •  Capacity Enhancement •  Technology Upgrade •  Flexible Footprint •  Modularity •  Simplified Installation •  Easy Maintenance CUSTOMER REQUIREMENTS •  Advanced  technologies  will  be   needed  to  increase  capacity  of   DAS  and  quality  of  DAS  signals   •  MIMO   •  Bandwidth   •  SON   •  Wi-­‐Fi  offload  capability  is  an   important  need   •  Ability  to  support  next   genera,on  WLAN  technologies   •  60GHz  Wi-­‐Fi  is  next   •  Applica,ons  are  cri,cal  to   opera,onal  efficiency   •  Operators  generate  new   revenues  from  enterprise   •  Customer  reten,on  is  cri,cal   Capacity  Enhancement   High-­‐Speed  WLAN   Applica,ons   WMTS LBS / PS Next  Genera,on  and  Future  Wireless  Network  Needs   27  
  28. 28. ICU   Next  Gen   HEU   The  Op,mum  “Solu,on”  Enables  Streamlined  In-­‐Building   Heterogeneous  Networks  U,lizing  DAS,  Small  Cells,  and  WiFi   BTS  (DAS)   C   O   R     E     M O  B       I   L   E     N     E     T   W O   R     K   WiFi  APs   Femtocell   Gateway   MDF   IDF   BBU  (Cube)   Building   Ethernet  Switch  (Femto/WiFi)   DAS   CPRI   ECU   Fiber  Cable   Fiber/Copper  Composite  Cable   Next  Gen   RAUs   BBU/RRU  (DAS)   RRUs   (e.g.,  ALU     Cube)   Femtocells   28  
  29. 29. Who  Pays?   ©  2013  AT&T  Intellectual  Property.  All   rights  reserved.  AT&T  and  the  AT&T  logo   are  trademarks  of  AT&T  Intellectual   Property.   29   Venue  Owner   Third  Party   Neutral  Host   Carrier  Owned  /   Single  Carrier   Carrier  Owned  /   Neutral  Host   One  Time  Capital  Cost   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Monthly  Recurring  Costs   Maintenance  &   Repairs  $   Yes   Yes   Yes   Own  /  Operate   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Manage  Carriers   Must   Yes   Yes   Yes   Open  Mul,-­‐Carrier  Network   Depends   Yes   No   Yes   Network  Opera,ons  Center  (NOC)   No  /  Sub   Contractor  $   Yes   Yes   Yes   Network  Upgrades   Yes,  though  $   Yes   Yes   Yes   Design  /  Deploy   Yes  /  Sub   Contractor  $   Yes   Yes   Yes  
  30. 30. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University
  31. 31. Network  Break  &  Lunch   Join  us  for  Networking  in  the  Exhibit  Area     12:00pm  Lunch  in  the  Ballroom  Sponsored  by:       We  return  for  presentaHons  at  1:00pm  
  32. 32. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University Moderator:  Douglas  J  Barned,  UES    
  33. 33. ROI  Analysis  –  Does  a  DAS  or  Small  Cell  Network   Deployment  Pay?   Douglas  Barne9   Universal  Electrical  Services   MODERATOR   Benoit  Fleury   iBwave   PANELISTS   Rene  Pachinghayag   AT&T   Bob  Butchko   RF  Connect   1:00pm  -­‐      ROI  Analysis  –  Does  a  DAS  or  Small  Cell  Network   Deployment  Pay?   Chris  Graff   SOLiD  
  34. 34.   Distributed   Antenna   System    
  35. 35. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University
  36. 36. DAS/WiFi/Small  Cell  Solu,ons  for  Hi-­‐Rise  Residen,al   Applica,ons   David  Bronston   Phillips  Lytle   MODERATOR   PANELISTS   Douglas  Fishman   SQUAN   Ronald  Plecas   CommScope   2:15pm  –  DAS/WiFi/Small  Cell  Solu:ons  for  Hi-­‐Rise  Residen:al   Applica:ons   Robert  Lopez   RCC  Consultants   John  Celentano   TESSCO  
  37. 37. The  Problem    -­‐  Wireless  vs.  Wireline   •  51.7  percent  of  U.S.  homes  don’t  have  or  didn’t  use  their  landlines  in  the   first  half  of  2012.    And  this  is  expected  to  con,nue  to  increase.  
  38. 38. The  Problem  –  Mobile  Data  Usage   •  According  to  Heavy  Reading  (trade  publica,on)  50%  of  all  mobile  data   usage  is  at  home  in  2011;  by  2016  projected  to  be  65%.     •  According  to  Pew  Research,  66%  of  18-­‐29  year  olds  have  Smartphones,   45%  of  total  adults  have  Smartphones.     •  Smartphone  and  Tablet  users  require  between  50  to  120  ,mes  capacity  of   standard  cellphones.     •  According  to  Ericsson  and  GigaOm,  data  now  accounts  for  85%  of  all   cellular  traffic.     Summary:  Mobile  data  usage  will  grow  dramaHcally  and  indoor-­‐ at  home  wireless  service  is,  or  will  become  very  important.    
  39. 39. The  Problem  –  Green  Buildings   •  Energy  efficient  windows  (“Low  E  Glass”)  effec,vely   block  a  significant  amount  of  wireless  (RF)  signals   from  entering/leaving  buildings  resul,ng  in  poor   coverage.  
  40. 40. The  Solu,on  -­‐  DAS   •  Advantages  of  DAS  for  Residen,al  Hi-­‐Rise   Applica,ons   –  Single  antenna  system  supports  mul,ple  carriers  and   technologies  (minimal  visual  impact)   –  Install  once,  future  changes  all  in  Head  End  (invisible  to   residents)   –  Poten,al  synergy  with  current/future  Public  Safety   requirements   –  Centralize  ac,ve  elements  (no  need  to  access  residents   private  space  aPer  iniHal  installaHon)  
  41. 41. The  Solu,on  -­‐  DAS   •  Challenges  of  DAS  for  Residen,al  Hi-­‐Rise   Applica,ons   –  Keeping  antennas  “hidden”   –  Cost,  including  DAS  and  BTS/Repeater  equipment   •  ROI  model  for  WSP  is  weak   •  Strategic  value?   –  Space  alloca,on  (IDF  closets  and  Head  End  Room)  –  and   associated  “cost”  
  42. 42. The  Solu,on  –  Small  Cells   •  Advantages  of  Small  Cells  for  Residen,al  Hi-­‐Rise   Applica,ons   –  Low  cost  per  unit  (Few  thousand  $$)   –  Ease  of  installa,on   –  No  need  for  a  Head  End  Room  (saving  on  real  estate)  
  43. 43. The  Solu,on  –  Small  Cells   •  Challenges  of  Small  Cells  for  Residen,al  Hi-­‐Rise   Applica,ons   –  Keeping  the  quan,ty  required  to  a  minimum   •  One  Small  Cell  =  one  WSP   •  One  Small  Cell  =  one  technology  (currently)   •  Limited  power  =  limited  coverage  area   •  Limited  capacity   –  Backhaul  –  requires  Ethernet  connec,vity  from  each  Small   Cell  back  to  the  WSP  switching  network   –  Maintenance,  especially  if  Small  Cells  are  installed  in   apartments  
  44. 44. The  Solu,on  -­‐  WiFi   •  Advantages  of  WiFi  for  Residen,al  Hi-­‐Rise   Applica,ons   –  Low  Cost  (especially  for  private  wireless  routers)   –  High  speed  and  large  capacity  available    (100  Mbps  per   user),  with  higher  speeds  imminent  (802.11ac)   –  One  technology  -­‐  Supports  all    Smartphones,  tablets,  Roku,   xBox,  AppleTV,  etc.    
  45. 45. The  Solu,on  –  Small  Cells   •  Challenges  of  WiFi  for  Residen,al  Hi-­‐Rise   Applica,ons   –  Interference/Reliability   –  Lack  of  connec,vity  to  WSPs   •  May  change  soon  –  Hotspot  2.0  
  46. 46. Conclusions   •  DAS  vs  Small  Cells*   –  DAS  for  larger  buildings  (500,000  sq    or  larger)   –  Small  cells  for  smaller  buildings  (100,000  sq    or  less)   –  Case-­‐by-­‐case  determina,on  for  100,000-­‐500,000  sq     buildings   •  Deploy  managed  WiFi  in  common  and  amenity   spaces   *IGR  Research,  U.S.  DAS  Total  Addressable  Market,  2012-­‐2017:  The  Large  Building  and  Venue   Opportunity,  presentaHon  at  DAS  in  AcHon,  April  2013.  
  47. 47. Small  Cell  Comparison  Chart   Solu:on   Descrip:on   Technology   Approx.  #  Users   Approx.   Cell  Radius   DAS   Typically  fed  by  a  macro  or  micro  base   sta,on.    High  power,  mul,-­‐frequency,  mul,-­‐ carrier.   UMTS   HSPA+   LTE   Up  to  1,800  users   per  base  sta,on   Up  to  3   miles   Wi-­‐Fi   A  wireless  access  point  connects  a  group  of   wireless  devices  to  an  adjacent  wired  LAN.   802.11b   802.11g     802.11n   Up  to  200  users   per  a  3-­‐radio   access  point   65  feet   Microcell   Short-­‐range  base  sta,on  used  for  enhancing   indoor  and/or  outdoor  coverage.   UMTS   HSPA+   32  to  200  users   Up  to  ≈1   mile   Metrocell   High-­‐capacity,  low  power  device  that  fills  in   coverage  holes  within  buildings.   UMTS   HSPA+   16  to  32  users   10,000  –   20,000   square  feet   Picocell   Typically  used  for  indoor  applica,ons  such  as   office  buildings,  airports,  and  malls.   UMTS   32  users   Up  to  750   feet   Femtocell   A  small,  low-­‐power  cellular  base  sta,on   typically  used  for  a  home  or  small  business.   UMTS   4-­‐6  users   40  feet  
  48. 48. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University
  49. 49. Networking  Coffee  Break   Join  us  for  Networking  in  the  Exhibit  Area     Coffee  Break  and  Warm  Pretzels  Sponsored  by:       We  return  for  presentaHons  at  3:30pm  
  50. 50. Budget  Approved!  What  Happens  (should  happen)   Once  the  Customer  Says  Yes   Kevin  Kurz   Anixter   MODERATOR   PANELISTS   Walter  Cannon   Metro  Network   Services   Rick  Baldasarre   Vision  Technologies   3:30pm  –  Budget  Approved!    What  Happens  (should  happen)  Once  the   Customer  Says  Yes   Mike  Brownson   HUTTON  
  51. 51. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University Moderator:  Andy  Germano,  VP  -­‐  Small  Cell  Forum    
  52. 52. Peering  Into  the  Future:    How  Does  the  Prevalence  of  VOLTE,   WIFI,  eMBMS,  Carrier  Aggrega,on  &  New  Spectrum   Opportuni,es  Shape  the  Future?     Andy  Germano   Small  Cell  Forum   MODERATOR   PANELISTS   Jeff  Thompson   Towerstream   James  Zik   PCTEL   4:45pm  –  Peering  Into  the  Future:    How  Does  the  Prevalence  of  VOLTE,   WIFI,  eMBMS,  Carrier  Aggrega:on  &  New  Spectrum  Opportuni:es   Shape  the  Future?     Prasad  Ravi   INOC   Ahmed  Abogendia   ATEC  Wireless  
  53. 53. The  Small  Cell  Forum   Aims Ecosystem Development Market Education Driving open standards Promoting & enabling small cell technology based on licensed spectrum, operator managed, edge-based intelligence Not-for-profit, founded in 2007 Independent, Inclusive, International 67 operators covering 3B mobile subscribers – 44% of global total 83 small cell technology providers representing all parts of ecosystem
  54. 54. HetNets  are  Mul,-­‐Dimensional  
  55. 55. Mo:va:ons  for  Small  Cells   •  Consumers increasingly sensitive to coverage •  Dramatic growth in mobile broadband •  Operator need to meet demand quickly at lower cost-per-bit Explosion  of  internet   connected  devices   Exponen:al  growth  of   mobile  data  traffic   Source:  Signals  Research  Group   Traffic  increasingly   indoors   Home   Office   Out  of  home  /  office   On  the  move   Source:  Informa   >80%  indoors  
  56. 56. »  Improved  coverage   »  Greater  capacity   »  Spectrum  efficiency   »  New  applica:ons   •  These  benefits  apply  equally  in  the  home  (femtocells),  office  (enterprise)  or  outside   environments  (metro,  rural)   •  Devices  remain  under  control  of  licensed  network  operators  and  operate  within   their  own  spectrum   Benefits  of  small  cells   56  
  57. 57. Traffic  offload  via  small  cells   21%   56%   75%   0%   10%   20%   30%   40%   50%   60%   70%   80%   1x   4x   10x   %  traffic  on  small  cells   Small  cells  per  macrocell   Results  from  recently  published  SCF   white  paper  www.scf.io      
  58. 58. User  experience  improvements   with  public  access  small  cells   58% 315% 523% 31% 138% 246% 0% 100% 200% 300% 400% 500% 600% 1 4 10 All Users Macro Users %  increase  in  median  throughput  over   macrocells  alone   Small  cells  per  macrocell  
  59. 59. eMBMs   Ahmed  Abogendia,  ATEC  Wireless  
  60. 60. Wireless  Ecosystem   New   Technology   New   infrastructure   and  Mobile   devices   Higher   Throughput   Throughput   Demanding   apps   More   Spectrum  
  61. 61. E-­‐MBMs   •  Evolved  Mul,media  Broadcast  Mul,cast  Services   (MBMS)  is  a  point-­‐to-­‐mul,point  interface  for  exis,ng   and  upcoming  3GPP  cellular  networks,  which  is   designed  to  provide  efficient  delivery  of  broadcast   and  mul,cast  services,  both  within  a  cell  as  well  as   within  the  core  network.     •  The  service  is  aimed  at  reducing  network  load  when   there's  some  traffic  workload  that  everyone  on  the   network  in  either  a  single  cell,  region,  or  en,re   network  are  likely  to  watch  or  view  
  62. 62. Smart  use  to  the  spectrum  
  63. 63. Applica,ons   Broadcast  transmission  across  mul,ple  cells,  it   defines  transmission  via  single-­‐frequency   network  configura,ons.  Applica,ons  include:   –  Mobile  TV  and  radio  broadcas,ng   –  File  delivery   –  Emergency  alerts  
  64. 64. Applica,ons   •  Venue-­‐specific  broadcast   –  Sports  /  arena  only   –  Rich  media:  mul,ple  cameras,  replays,  sta,s,cs     •  Region-­‐specific  broadcast   –  Home  team  games   –  Local  events/news     •  Na,on-­‐wide  broadcast   –  World  Cup  and  Super  Bowl   –  Breaking  news   –  Emergency  alerts  
  65. 65. When?   •  Verizon  announces  2014  to  offer  eMBMs  service  on   its  LTE  network   •  "You'll  see  it  mature  in  scale  within  the  three-­‐year   ,me  horizon,"  AT&T  CEO  Randall  Stephenson  
  66. 66. Support     Prasad  Ravi,  INOC  
  67. 67. And  now  the  fun  begins  –  Support!   •  Design,  Deployment,  Tes,ng,  Produc,on…   •  Ongoing  Support  –  Network   –  DAS,  Small  Cell,  Macro,  WiFi,  Microwave   –  Ethernet,  SONET,  DWDM   –  IP,  MPLS   –  T1/E1,  T3/E3   •  Ongoing  Support  –  User   –  Android,  iOS,  Mac  OS,  Windows   How  are  we  to  support  all  these  technologies   and  user  environments?  
  68. 68. Observa,ons  and  thoughts  on  Support   Tier 1 NOC Support Incident Management Trouble Ticketing, Notification, Escalation, Third-Party Management, Troubleshooting Tier 2 and 3 NOC Support Problem Management, Change Management, Performance Management Help Desk Support Smartphones, Tablets, Laptops Connectivity, Application Support Reporting &Analysis Users Infrastructure Monitoring Systems Support  Structure  
  69. 69. Observa,ons  and  thoughts  on  Support  (Contd…)   PERIODIC  REVIEW   13%   DOCUMENTATION     5%   INCIDENT  MANAGEMENT     25%   24x7  EVENT  MONITORING   39%   CALLS/E-­‐MAILS   18%   NOC  Support  Ac:vity  by  Category  
  70. 70. Observa,ons  and  thoughts  on  Support  (Contd…)   NOC  Support  Ac:vity  by  Support  Tier   PERIODIC  REVIEW-­‐Tier  1   3%  DOCUMENTATION-­‐Tier  1     2%   INCIDENT  MANAGEMENT-­‐Tier  1     7%   24x7  EVENT  MONITORING-­‐Tier   1   39%   CALLS/E-­‐MAILS-­‐Tier  1   14%   PERIODIC  REVIEW-­‐Tier  2/3   10%   DOCUMENTATION-­‐Tier  2/3     3%   INCIDENT  MANAGEMENT-­‐Tier   2/3     18%   CALLS/E-­‐MAILS-­‐Tier  2/3   4%  
  71. 71. VoLTE   James  Zik,  PCTEL  
  72. 72. VoLTE   •  VoLTE:    The  promise  of  LTE   –  One  flat  IP  network  for  both  voice  and  data   •  VoLTE  first  deployment:    MetroPCS  (2012),  Verizon  (2014)   –  VoLTE/IMS  for  call  control   •  VoLTE  requirements   –  2G-­‐3G  voice  quality  (beder  than  VOIP  which  is  best  effort)   –  Low  latency   –  RAN  Op,miza,on  goal  (SINR  10  dB  over  90%  of  coverage  area)   Customers  will  evaluate  the  network  based  on  the  QoE  of  the  voice  network    
  73. 73. VoLTE   OSI  Layers   Physical   Transport   Network   Link   Applica:on   Presenta:on   Session   1   4   3   2   7   6   5     Voice  Applica,ons       SIP,  RTP     TCP,  UDP     IP,  RRC,  NAS     MAC,  RLC,  PDCP     OFDM,  LTE,  etc.   2G/3G    Dedicated  Voice  Bearers   IP,  RRC,  NAS     MAC,  RLC,  PDCP     OFDM,  WCDMA   4G  Dedicated  Data  Bearers  
  74. 74. VoLTE  Enablers   Why  VoLTE  is  not  just  another  VOIP  Service   •  QoS   –  Dedicated  data  bearer   –  Dynamic  scheduler  at  base  sta,on   –  Quality  of  Class  Indicator  (QCI)  for  sesng  priority   •  RAN  Enhancements   –  Semi-­‐persistent  scheduler   –  Transmission  Timing  Interval  (TTI)   –  Robust  Header  Compression  (RoHC)   •  IP  Mul,media  Subsystem  (IMS)   –  Session  Ini,a,on  Protocol  (SIP)   –  Policy  and  Changing  Rules  Func,on  (PCRF)   –  Real  ,me  transport  protocol  (RTP)   –  Real-­‐,me  Streaming  Protocol  (RTSP)  
  75. 75. New  Spectrum  Opportuni,es   •  US  Spectrum  Opportuni,es   –  600  MHz  Band  via  FCC  incen,ve  auc,on  (2014)   •  Up  to  126  MHz  of  spectrum  from  UHF  analog  TV   –  1695  to  1710  MHz  (15  MHz)  2015  FCC  target   –  3500  Band  up  to  100  MHz  of  spectrum  for  small  cells  (2015  FCC  target)   •  Shared  with  military  and  marine  radar  systems  in  coastal  regions   •  EMEA  Spectrum  Opportuni,es   –  700/800  Digital  Dividend  (E-­‐UTRA  Bands  20,  28  and  44)   •  Available  due  the  transi,on  from  analog  TV  to  Digital   •  Under  review  at  the  Wireless  Radio  Communica,on  Conf.  (2015)   –  1700  and  2100  band  (25  MHz  each)  
  76. 76. Spectrum  Proper,es     •  Not  all  spectrum  bands  are  created  equal   –  Lower  frequency  bands  (450  -­‐  900  MHz)   •  Travels  long  distance  for  coverage   •  Good  building  and  foliage  penetra,on     –  Higher  frequencies  (1700  –  2600  MHz)   •  Poor  distance  coverage   •  Poor  building  and  foliage  penetra,on   –  2600  MHz  typically  requires  9x  number  of  antennas  to  provide  the  same  coverage  as   700  MHz   •  Rural  areas  (key  factor  is  coverage)   –  Lower  frequency  band  beder   •  Urban  areas  (key  factor  is  capacity)   –  Will  require  large  number  of  cells  anyway  to  provide  coverage   –  LTE  uses  1:1  frequency  reuse,  more  interference  issues  with  lower  frequencies   •  In-­‐building  (key  factor  maybe  capacity  (stadium)  or  coverage  (conven,on   center))                           vs   2600  MHz   700  MHz  
  77. 77. Spectrum  Usage  in  LTE-­‐Advanced   •  LTE-­‐Advanced  (Hetnets)   –  Geo-­‐locate  hotspots  in  a  sector  and  add  a  small  cell  to  improve  capacity   –  If  using  same  band,  requires  inter-­‐cell  interference  coordina,on  (complex)   –  Prefer  to  use  high  frequency  band  (3500  MHz)  for  Small  Cell     •  No  interference  issues  or  coordina,on  required  and  doesn’t  travel  far     Macro Cell Small Cell Low  throughput  around  edges   without  interference  coordina,on   –  In-­‐Building  (Stadium  Example)       Poor  separa,on  between  yellow  and  red  sectors   Employing  separate  bands  (AWS  and  3500)  reduces   noise  (higher  SINR)  thereby  maximizes  throughput   (capacity)   AWS   3500  
  78. 78. How  do  we  Maximum  Capacity?   78   More  Spectrum   •  Limited  licensed  spectrum  available   •  Expensive     Migra,on  to  LTE     LTE  MIMO     Increased  Cell   Density   Spectrum   Efficiency   •  Largest  and  fastest  return  on  investment   •  Beder  spectral  efficiency,  throughput  improvement  Op,miza,on   Must  employ  all  of  these  solu:ons  to  solve  the  spectrum  crunch   •  Carrier  grade  WiFi  and  backhaul  required   •  33%  of  mobile  traffic  in  2012  (Cisco  VNI  Mobile  2013)   WiFi/Femto  Cell   Offload   •  Small  Cells  and  DAS  (expensive)   •  Backhaul  required  to  each  cell/DAS   •  Migra,on  to  LTE  and  LTE  Advanced   •  LTE  MIMO    
  79. 79. Spectrum  in  a  5G/6G  World   •  5G/6G  Requirements  (2020  and  beyond)   –  10  –  100x  data  rates  (10  Gb/s  download  speeds)   –  1000x  capacity/area   –  100  Gb  cell  capacity   •  Spectrum  Opportuni,es  (to  achieve  high  data  rates)   –  Microwave  (3  GHz  –  30  GHz)  and  Millimeter  Band  (30  GHz  –  300  GHz)   •  24  GHz  –  40  GHz  currently  being  inves,gated   •  Line-­‐of-­‐sight  and  short  distances  (1m  -­‐  60m  realis,cally)   •  Severely  affected  by  rain,  fog,  snow,  foliage,  etc.     –  Lots  of  spectrum  is  available   •  WiFi  Offload   –  802.11ad  (WiGig)   •  60  GHz  spectrum  with  a  range  of  <10m  (7  Gbps  download,  up  to  25  Gbps)   Next  Genera:on  mobile  technology  will  be  primarily  for  in-­‐building  use  
  80. 80. Summary  and  Conclusions   •  Spectrum  is  a  finite  and  expensive  resource   –  The  Radio  Access  Network  (RAN)  is  the  most  cri,cal  piece  of  the  mobile   network   •  Air  environment  is  an  uncontrolled  medium  unlike  fiber  or  copper   •  Subject  to  environmental  condi,ons   •  Anyone  can  generate  a  source  of  interference   •  1°variance  in  antenna  azimuth  or  ,lt  can  result  in  10  dB  signal  difference  (dropped  calls  or   Mb/s  reduc,on  in  data  throughput)   •  Op,miza,on  of  in-­‐building  RAN  must  be  done  during  deployment   –  Unable  to  get  access  to  the  building  later  for  op,miza,on   •  Next  Genera,on  Mobile  Technology  will  be  in-­‐building  centric   Mobile  networks  will  become  so  cri:cal  that  future  RANs  will  have  live   network  monitoring  of  the  over-­‐the-­‐air  signal   DAS  will  be  at  the  center  of  Next  Genera:on  Mobile  Networks  
  81. 81. Q  &  A   Peering  Into  the  Future:  How  Does  the  Prevalence  of   VoLTE,  WiFi,  eMBMS,  Carrier  Aggrega:on  and  New   Spectrum  Opportuni:es  Shape  the  Future?  
  82. 82. VoLTE  
  83. 83. WiFi   802.11   protocol   Release   Freq.  (GHz)   Bandwidth   (MHz)   Data  rate   (Mbit/s)     MIMO   —   Jun  1997   2.4   20   1,  2   1   a   Sep  1999   5   20   6,  9,  12,  18,  24,   36,  48,  54   1   3.7   b   Sep  1999   2.4   20   1,  2,  5.5,  11   1   g   Jun  2003   2.4   20   6,  9,  12,  18,  24,   36,  48,  54   1   n   Oct  2009   2.4/5   20   7.2,  14.4,  21.7,   28.9,  43.3,  57.8,   65,  72.2   4   40   15,  30,  45,  60,  90,   120,  135,  150   ac   Dec  2012   5   20   up  to  87.6   8   40   up  to  200   80   up  to  433.3   160   up  to  866.7   ad   ~Feb  2014   2.4/5/60   up  to  6912   (6.75Gb/s)  
  84. 84. Mega  Trends   Mobile  Data  Traffic  by   Applica,on  2018   Source:  Ericsson  Mobility  Report,  June  2013  
  85. 85. Carrier  Aggrega,on  
  86. 86. New  Spectrum  Opportuni,es  
  87. 87. LTE  Spectrum  Bands  
  88. 88. Poten,al  New  Bands   •  Small  Cell  Band   •  600  MHz  
  89. 89. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University
  90. 90. Networking  Recep,on   Join  us  for  Cocktails  in  the  Exhibit  Area   Cocktails  and  Hors  d’oeuvres  Sponsored  by:       We  ret         SAVE  THE  DATES!   JANUARY  15,  2014   Social  in  Philadelphia   APRIL  2,  2014   Educa,onal  Conference    &  Training  in  New  York   JULY  16,  2014   Social  in  Boston   OCTOBER  9,  2014   Fall  Training  and  Social  
  91. 91. WASHINGTON D.C. IN-BUILDING WIRELESS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT October 2, 2013 Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet University

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