Share this E-book

Workforce in Motion:
Recruiting, Retaining and Engaging
the New Face of the Retail Workforce

Sponsored...
The New Face of Retail
In the past decade or so, an entirely new store associate
has emerged onto the retail scene. Today’...
Play

Work

dinner @ 7?

dinner @ 7?

Great appetizers!

Swapping
shifts

Reservations @7

Swipe in with
time clock

Fill ...
Millennials Emerge
No matter which labels we use to describe millennials, they are 80 million strong in the U.S., and
they...
Expectations and Objectives:
Separating Myths from Millennials
Often referred to as the “Me Generation,” millennials in re...
Additionally, millennials’ well-documented desires for a fun
and social workplace indicate a desire for a positive work
ex...
Retail Ramifications
What then do these expectations mean to retailers looking to recruit, engage
and retain millennial wo...
Workforce in Motion • 8

Share this E-book

Workforce Management Technology:
The Key to Meeting Millennial Expectations?
F...
To dig deeper into retailers’ plans to close the WFM
technology gap identified by the Retail Systems Research
study, we su...
WFM Health Check
To begin the analysis, we asked retailers a handful
of questions to assess the health of their workforce
...
Workforce in Motion • 11

Share this E-book

Adding to the challenge, most retailers struggle with disconnected views of
l...
Workforce in Motion • 12

Share this E-book

Retailers as a Whole Are
Wholly Unsatisfied
The list of workforce-related sho...
Not surprisingly, ineffective and
disconnected systems that result in
long lists of missing capabilities have
led to wides...
The Good News: Mobile Is on the Move
A large percentage of retailers see mobility as an
opportunity to improve their workf...
The Road to ROI
When asked which functions retailers feel mobility can
impact most, they cited functions from a wide swath...
Workforce in Motion • 16

Share this E-book

When asked which mobile apps have the highest
potential ROI, however, employe...
Coveted Capabilities
Retailers planning to invest in mobility this year have
developed a long list of capabilities they in...
The Road Ahead
To capture the opportunities inherent in workforce mobility and overcome many
of the shortcomings most reta...
Blueprint of Key Capabilities for WFM to
Attract, Retain and Engage Employees
Modern workforce technologies can provide re...
and it’s just about impossible without the right tools. Modern scheduling tools
can help forecast and schedule labor resou...
About JDA
Software Group, Inc.

JDA® Software Group, Inc., The Supply Chain
Company®, offers the broadest portfolio of sup...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Workforce in Motion: Recruiting, Retaining and Engaging the New Face of the Retail Workforce

752 views
633 views

Published on

Over the past decade, a new breed of store associate has emerged on the retail scene: empowered Millennials.

Today’s new store associates are confident in their ability to put technology — particularly mobile devices — to work to enrich their daily lives.With 80 million Millennials now in the workforce, retailers must rethink how they connect, engage and empower their employees.

To keep pace with Millennials’ expectations, retailers must:
Consider the role of mobile;start evaluating self-service scheduling; and implement sophisticated, automated scheduling capabilities.

Published in: Business, Career
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
752
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Workforce in Motion: Recruiting, Retaining and Engaging the New Face of the Retail Workforce

  1. 1. Share this E-book Workforce in Motion: Recruiting, Retaining and Engaging the New Face of the Retail Workforce Sponsored by E-book
  2. 2. The New Face of Retail In the past decade or so, an entirely new store associate has emerged onto the retail scene. Today’s new associates are both well versed and confident in their ability to put technology — particularly mobile technology — to work for them to enrich their daily lives. They embrace and integrate new gadgets, devices and applications into their lifestyles unlike any preceding generation. Unfortunately, when they clock in for work at their local retail store, more often than not they are forced to disconnect, unplug and abandon these tools. All too often, bulletin boards in back rooms are used to post schedules for the coming week. Swapping shifts to accommodate unexpected conflicts requires a phone call to the manager. Many workers will punch a paper card, or swipe a piece of plastic on a time clock and then look for a manager Consider how retail workers might spend a typical night to receive their shift assignments. At the end of the shift, off the clock. A good number of them are likely to invite most of these workers will fill out a paper or electronic form friends to dinner via text message or a mobile Facebook to document the completed tasks, and possibly even write post. They may decide which restaurant to visit using Yelp, a note to the boss requesting a day off. make reservations online via OpenTable, check in upon arrival via Foursquare and, once seated, determine what to order with help from Urbanspoon. During dinner, they may take photos to share on Instagram, write a quick review of the restaurant on Zagat or even tweet about their meal to all their followers on Twitter. Workforce in Motion • 2 Share this E-book
  3. 3. Play Work dinner @ 7? dinner @ 7? Great appetizers! Swapping shifts Reservations @7 Swipe in with time clock Fill out form to document completed tasks Yum! Workforce in Motion • 3 Share this E-book
  4. 4. Millennials Emerge No matter which labels we use to describe millennials, they are 80 million strong in the U.S., and they are rapidly emerging as the dominant generation in retail’s workforce. According to a recent study by Millennial Branding and Payscale titled Gen Y in the Workplace, millennials are five times as likely as any other generation to hold retail merchandising and sales jobs. As early as next year, millennials will make up a third of the total workforce; in seven years, they will represent half of all retail workers. Clearly, they are a force to be reckoned with, and the sooner we recognize the unique expectations and desires of millennial workers, the sooner we will be in a better position to recruit, engage and retain the people who represent the new face of retail. 2014 5x Millennials are five times as likely as any other generation to hold retail merchandising and sales jobs Millennials will make up a third of the total workforce. In seven years, they will represent half of all retail workers Workforce in Motion • 4 Share this E-book
  5. 5. Expectations and Objectives: Separating Myths from Millennials Often referred to as the “Me Generation,” millennials in recent years have been stereotyped as self-centered, entitled and lacking the loyalty of the generations that preceded them in the workplace. However, close scrutiny of the vast amount of available research paints a very different picture of this rapidly emerging force. A survey by PwC titled PwC’s NextGen: A Global Generational Study fully dispels the myth that millennial workers have a sense of entitlement, finding instead that they “have grown up not expecting their organizations to meet all of their needs, including job security, [and] they are as equally committed to their work as non-millennials.” While most surveys also indicate that millennials desire more recognition at work than other generations, a 2012 survey from MTV Research titled No Collar Workers, casts these expectations of feedback in a different and positive light. According to the report, their expectations of feedback and coaching stem from “millennials’ call for meaning, mentorship and meritocracy in a workplace that channels what they bring to the table.” Their expectations of feedback and coaching stem from “millennials’ call for meaning, mentorship and meritocracy in a workplace that channels what they bring to the table.” Workforce in Motion • 5 Share this E-book
  6. 6. Additionally, millennials’ well-documented desires for a fun and social workplace indicate a desire for a positive work experience, a desire that all generations share and one that most businesses aspire to create. Work/life balance is also important to the typical millennial, with most studies confirming the relative importance of personal learning, development and flexible work hours over monetary rewards. Finally, while many millennial myths have indeed been dispelled by the recent research, one stereotype holds true in virtually every study: Technology is an important aspect of every facet of millennial lifestyles, including their employment choices. Unfortunately, most employers are failing to live up to their expectations, with almost half of millennials surveyed by PwC indicating that their managers did not always understand the way they use technology at work. Technology is an important aspect of every facet of millennial lifestyles, including their employment choices. Unfortunately, most employers are failing to live up to their expectations, with almost half of millennials surveyed by PwC indicating that their managers did not always understand the way they use technology at work. Workforce in Motion • 6 Share this E-book
  7. 7. Retail Ramifications What then do these expectations mean to retailers looking to recruit, engage and retain millennial workers? While the list of implications is long, three items jump out as high-priority issues that need to be addressed: 1. Mobility Matters 2. Start Evaluating SelfService Scheduling 3. Schedule Modeling Makes for a More Efficient Workplace Without question, the time has come to evaluate mobility. Millennial workers have grown up with small screens in their hands, and in addition to expecting their employers to engage via mobile devices, they are also ideally suited to adopt mobile applications. And the good news is that tasks at every level of the enterprise — from back rooms to the sales floor to the warehouse to the district manager’s office — can be completed more efficiently and effectively with the help of mobile technologies. One way to satisfy today’s workers’ desire for better work/ life balance is to offer more flexible scheduling options. Selfservice schedule management tools, including shift swapping and bidding for shifts, especially when delivered via mobile devices, gives workers much more control over the shifts they work and streamlines the schedule management process — a win-win for employees and retailers alike. The days of simply scheduling to adhere to cost budgets are fading fast. Modern tools with sophisticated and automated scheduling capabilities enable much more sophisticated scheduling capabilities that enable store managers to develop schedules that closely align resources to demand patterns, whether the demand is for sales associates or service personnel needed to fill online orders. Once schedules align better to demand, the entire store can begin to function more efficiently and effectively, enabling better customer experiences and also helping to create the type of harmonious and rewarding work environment that millennials desire. Workforce in Motion • 7 Share this E-book
  8. 8. Workforce in Motion • 8 Share this E-book Workforce Management Technology: The Key to Meeting Millennial Expectations? From mobility to schedule optimization, modern workforce management (WFM) technologies help retailers adapt to the desires and expectations of the emerging millennial generation. Yet WFM technology adoption remains inconsistent. The December 2012 survey by Retail Systems Research titled WFM 2013: The Store Employee in the Customer Age, found that while nearly threequarters of retailers with annual revenue greater than $5 billion rate themselves as having high capabilities in most aspects of the employee lifecycle, that percentage drops dramatically as annual revenue declines. In fact, only 41 percent of mid-market retailers ($51M-$999M in annual revenue) rate themselves as having high capabilities in the most basic function of time and attendance. Company capatibility at various points in employee lifecycle 58% Time and Attendance Absence Management Recruiting Hiring/On-boarding Budgeting/Planning Forecasting and Scheduling Task Management Labor Analytics 41% 33% 50% 33% 1% 17% 59% 32% 9% 65% 3% 30% 59% 11% 23% 64% 13% 48% 19% 16% 0 33% 53% 20 High Capability 40 31% 60 80 Some Capability 100 120 Little or No Capability Source: RSR Research, December 2012
  9. 9. To dig deeper into retailers’ plans to close the WFM technology gap identified by the Retail Systems Research study, we surveyed more than 150 retailers between December 2012 and January 2013. By conducting this research, we hoped to gain insights into two questions: 1 2 Has the industry recognized the need to employ technology to help adapt to the needs of an evolving and demanding workforce? Will the industry (finally) embrace mobility for its associates? Digging Deeper into the Expectations of Millennials Dave Bruno, Director of Product Marketing at JDA, discusses the emerging impact of millennials on the retail workforce and the key aspects of retail’s response. Workforce in Motion • 9 Share this E-book
  10. 10. WFM Health Check To begin the analysis, we asked retailers a handful of questions to assess the health of their workforce management processes. In short, we found a broad range of tools — with a correspondingly diverse range of capabilities — in place today: 44% use manual systems, home-grown systems or spreadsheets to manage workforce scheduling and optimization, while only 24% utilize specialized scheduling systems. Workforce in Motion • 10 Share this E-book
  11. 11. Workforce in Motion • 11 Share this E-book Adding to the challenge, most retailers struggle with disconnected views of labor across the enterprise, with only 16 percent of retailers surveyed having automated scheduling systems that manage labor across the entire organization: What aspects does your automated scheduling capability cover? Store labor only 34% We do not have an automated capability 26% Distribution center labor only 16% All hourly labor across the enterprise 16% Store and distribution center labor 0 7% 5 10 15 84% 20 25 30 of retailers surveyed do not automate the scheduling of labor across their entire enterprise. 35
  12. 12. Workforce in Motion • 12 Share this E-book Retailers as a Whole Are Wholly Unsatisfied The list of workforce-related shortcomings that retailers are experiencing every day is long and varied: What shortcomings and/or deficiencies are you experiencing in the area of workforce scheduling and optimization capabilities? 41% Lack of automation in scheduling workforce Limited modeling of workforce needs for seasonality, promotions or new marketing expansion 32% 31% Unplanned/unbudgeted labor costs Inability to jointly schedule traffic-based and task-based labor 29% 26% Balancing site-level workloads and budgets Poor results implementing plans according to model 19% Central planners unable to consider store-level 15% workforce capacity when assigning tasks 10 20 30 40 50
  13. 13. Not surprisingly, ineffective and disconnected systems that result in long lists of missing capabilities have led to widespread dissatisfaction with workforce scheduling and optimization. Only 45% of retailers surveyed are either “completely” or “highly” satisfied with their existing workforce scheduling and optimization capabilities. Workforce in Motion • 13 Share this E-book
  14. 14. The Good News: Mobile Is on the Move A large percentage of retailers see mobility as an opportunity to improve their workforce management practices. If 2012 was unofficially “The Year of the Mobile Consumer,” then 2013 appears to have the potential to be declared “The Year of the Mobile Associate.” In fact, 52 percent of retailers surveyed indicated that they intend to spend more money on mobile workforce technology than they spent in 2012, with 18 percent indicating they intend to spend significantly more (15-50 percent more). Planned mobile workforce investment 2013 vs. 2012 34% 30% 64% of retailers surveyed plan to increase spending on mobile workforce tools this year. Less The Same Greater than 50% More 14% 6% 4% 4% 1-15% More 15-25% More 25-50% More Source: JDA 2013 Retail Workforce Mobility Snapshot Workforce in Motion • 14 Share this E-book
  15. 15. The Road to ROI When asked which functions retailers feel mobility can impact most, they cited functions from a wide swath of the business. While most align with millennial expectations for technology as a tool for empowerment, retailers’ priorities are, as expected, more customer-centric than employeecentric, with self-service scheduling ranking far behind customer service: How would you weigh the functions that mobility can impact? Each function was rated from 1 to 5 with 1 being the highest priority. 4.16 Customer Service 3.73 Task Compliance & Visibility 3.68 3.56 District Staff Communications Endless Aisle for Associates 3.16 Self-Service Scheduling Source: JDA 2013 Retail Workforce Mobility Snapshot Workforce in Motion • 15 Share this E-book
  16. 16. Workforce in Motion • 16 Share this E-book When asked which mobile apps have the highest potential ROI, however, employee-centric apps outranked customer-centric apps by a significant margin: Mobile apps with the highest ROI potential? Mobilizing paper processes, improving the timeliness of communications Mobilizing task assignment and execution, compliance, visibility Providing “endless aisle” capabilities to sales associates Source: JDA 2013 Retail Workforce Mobility Snapshot 69% 61% 55%
  17. 17. Coveted Capabilities Retailers planning to invest in mobility this year have developed a long list of capabilities they intend to implement throughout the store, including applications for both store associates and store managers: Store manager mobile capabilities by year-end? Use smartphones to complete and assign tasks Use smartphones to view and adjust schedules Use smartphones to view KPIs & metrics in real time 62% 46% 44% Source: JDA 2013 Retail Workforce Mobility Snapshot Store associate mobile capabilities by year-end? 58% Use smartphones to complete tasks assigned to them 52% Use smartphones to access clienteling tools to assist customers 49% Use smartphones to view KPIs and metrics in real time 36% Use smartphones to enable crosschannel fulfillment in the store Source: JDA 2013 Retail Workforce Mobility Snapshot Workforce in Motion • 17 Share this E-book
  18. 18. The Road Ahead To capture the opportunities inherent in workforce mobility and overcome many of the shortcomings most retailers are currently facing with their workforce scheduling and optimization practices, we see a large number of retailers planning to invest in WFM technology: Do you have plans to implement/upgrade your workforce scheduling and optimization capabilities? Early stages 22% No plans 60% Planned 40% 12-24 months 13% Expect in 3-5 years Perhaps now is the time to think about upgrading? 5% For those retailers struggling to get by on outdated systems with limited mobile capabilities, the clock is ticking. If current trends continue as predicted and millennials comprise one-third of the retail workforce by next year, having the right tools and technologies in place to recruit, engage and retain these employees will be critical to survival. Workforce in Motion • 18 Share this E-book
  19. 19. Blueprint of Key Capabilities for WFM to Attract, Retain and Engage Employees Modern workforce technologies can provide retailers with a blueprint for overcoming the challenges presented by the growing presence of millennial employees in the workplace. From optimized scheduling to mobile task management, the list of capabilities that directly address the expectations of millennial workers necessary to build a next-generation retail model and enables the effective delivery of consistently exceptional customer service is a requirement for long-term survival. Time and Attendance? Timeand Attendance? The old days when time and attendance was all about punch cards and payroll interfaces are long gone. It’s a different story today. Modern technologies enable employees to clock in and out via tablets, POS registers and even their phones. Collecting and analyzing punch data, reducing labor costs and improving compliance are the key time and attendance strategies for industry-leading companies today. In addition to interfacing with various input sources, an integrated approach to time and attendance, demand forecasting and scheduling optimization helps reduce labor costs, manage schedules, track benefits accruals, administer training and perform job costing. Scheduling Scheduling Manually juggling staffing decisions based on demand, union rules, government regulations and employee preferences can be a daunting task. Throw in the need to track and reward performance Workforce in Motion • 19 Share this E-book
  20. 20. and it’s just about impossible without the right tools. Modern scheduling tools can help forecast and schedule labor resources according to demand patterns and employee preference — a significant demand for millennial workers — as well as track their performance, and reward their achievements. Task Management Task Management With so much work to be done and while attempting to balance the right corporate objectives with sales and service tasks, can you ensure you always have the right people doing the right tasks to meet corporate objectives? Task management solutions can help you ensure that the right people, with the right skills, are working on the right tasks, with store-specific compliance data and feedback. Mobility Mobility An integrated mobility platform can enhance every aspect of WFM technology, driving adoption, efficiency and productivity in every corner of the retail store. From self-service scheduling to shift swapping to task management, leading mobility platforms engage the millennial worker on devices they have grown up with, deliver the scheduling flexibility they desire, and make them more productive and engaged employees. Workforce in Motion • 20 Share this E-book
  21. 21. About JDA Software Group, Inc. JDA® Software Group, Inc., The Supply Chain Company®, offers the broadest portfolio of supply chain, retail merchandising, store operations and all-channel commerce solutions to help companies manage the flow of goods from raw materials to finished products and into the hands of consumers. JDA’s deep industry expertise and innovative cloud platform help companies optimize inventory, labor and customer service levels. As a result, JDA solutions have become the standard for the world’s leading retailers, manufacturers and distributors. To learn more, visit jda.com or email info@jda.com. About Retail TouchPoints Retail TouchPoints is an online publishing network for retail executives, with content focused on optimizing the customer experience across all channels. The Retail TouchPoints network is comprised of a weekly newsletter, special reports, web seminars, exclusive benchmark research, and a content-rich web site featuring daily news updates and multi-media interviews at  www.retailtouchpoints.com. The Retail TouchPoints team also interacts with social media communities via Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Workforce in Motion • 21 Share this E-book

×